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2005 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Technical Program


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FEBRUARY 13-17 · 2005 TMS ANNUAL MEETING · SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA
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Mechanical Behavior

SYMPOSIUM: Computational Thermodynamics and Phase Transformations Symposium to feature Plenary Presentation By the Director of the Princeton Materials Institute
PLENARY SPEAKER
Suresh
DR. DAVID J. SROLOVITZ
Director
Princeton Materials Institute
USA
Anisotropic Grain Boundary Properties
Grain boundary structure and properties depend on five distinct crystallographic variables: three to describe the relative orientation of one grain with respect to the other and two to describe the boundary plane. The evolution of polycrystalline structures may depend upon the anisotropy in grain boundary mobility, grain boundary free energy/stiffness, efficiency with which the boundary absorbs defects. In this presentation, we focus upon grain boundary properties that are important for quantitative modeling of the evolution of polycrystalline microstructures as a function of these crystallographic parameters (i.e., grain boundary mobility and grain boundary stiffness). We discuss how to determine these properties using molecular dynamics simulations. Finally, we compare predicted grain boundary dynamical properties with experimental measurements to draw some conclusions on what controls the rate at which polycrystalline structures evolve.

SYMPOSIUM: Mechanical Behavior of Thin Films and Small Structures
This symposium will provide a forum for researchers involved in experimental or theoretical investigations into the mechanical behavior of thin films, MEMS and NEMS and other small structures. The symposium will focus on experimental, theoretical, and computational studies related to thin films, MEMS, NEMS and other small structures. These studies will include, but are not limited to, the following subject areas: Thin film mechanics, fatigue, fracture, delamination, deformation, plasticity, creep, electromigration and other mass transfer effects, stability, reliability, in situ techniques, advances in nanomechanical testing techniques, tribological properties including adhesion, friction, wear, and surface chemistry/topography, and theoretical, computational and analytical modeling of mechanical properties in small dimensions.

SYMPOSIUM: Computational Aspects of Mechanical Properties of Materials
The objectives of this symposium are to review recent advances in the applications of computational methods and materials sciences principles to simulating or predicting mechanical behavior of materials. Particular interests are on theoretical computation or simulation of mechanical properties of materials over multi-length or time scales and the comparison of theoretical results against experimental data or observations. The proceedings from this symposium are planned for publication in Metallurgical and Materials Transactions

SYMPOSIUM: Micromechanics of Advanced Materials II (Symposium in Honor of James C.M. Li’s 80th Birthday)
Since the micromechanics of materials controls the structural integrity and hence the reliability of all complex advanced structures and devices, it is both technologically and timely important to propose the second symposium on this topic in 2005 at the same time to celebrate Professor James C.M. Li’s 80th birthday, who made significant contributions in all areas of micromechanics of materials. We hope to draw all Professor Li’s long time colleagues, friends, and students in the fields of micromechanics and materials science to join this symposium. There will be many invited talks as in the first symposium. Some examples of what could be included in the proposed sessions are 1) mechanical properties of small dimensions; 2) experimental methods and studies of micromechanics of localized deformation; 3) thermodynamics and rate theory of micromechanical processes; 4) micromechanics of fracture and fatigues; 5) contact adhesion of smooth and rough surfaces; 6) micro-cutting and machining; 7) residual stresses in micro- systems and 8) Micro-mechanical packaging.


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