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2000 TMS Fall Meeting: Special Tutorial



October 8–12, 2000 · TMS FALL MEETING 2000 · St. Louis, Missouri

Focusing on physical metallurgy and materials, the TMS 2000 Fall Meeting will feature a wide array of technical symposia sponsored by The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (TMS). A poster session is also planned. As a greater convenience for attendees, the meeting is typically colocated with ASM International's Materials Solutions Conference. Technical sessions will focus on key information and successful strategies to give attendees insight into the research, development, and application of new materials processes, analysis techniques, and equipment advances.

The TMS 2000 Fall Meeting will take place in St. Louis, Missouri, at the Regal Riverfront Hotel, which will be the TMS headquarters for the event. All technical sessions and conference registration will be located here.

SPECIAL TUTORIAL

A Crystallography and Diffraction Tutorial Sponsored by the ASM-MSCTS Structures Committee

Date and Time: Monday, October 9, 2000, 8:00 AM 12:00 NOON
Location: Regal Riverfront Hotel
Presented by: Prof. Marc DeGraef, Prof. David Laughlin, Prof. Mike McHenry; Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania




In this 4-hour tutorial we will introduce the basic concepts of crystallography: lattice geometry and symmetry. We will define the 7 crystal systems and illustrate how lattice geometry computations (bond distances and angles) can be performed using the metric tensor concept. Then we introduce the reciprocal space description and the associated geometrical considerations. Symmetry operations are an essential ingredient of the description of a crystal structure, and we will enumerate the most important symmetry elements. We will take a close look at how sets of symmetry elements, called point groups and space groups, can be used to succinctly describe crystal structures. We will use 10 different crystal structures as examples throughout the tutorial. The last part of the tutorial will introduce concepts of diffraction, in particular the structure factor, and will illustrate how the International Tables for Crystallography can be used effectively. Throughout the entire tutorial we will make extensive use of software tools to illustrate various concepts. All software tools will be made available from a website.

David E. Laughlin is Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. He is also the Director of the Magnetic Recording Media Group in the Data Storage Systems Center of CMU and Editor of Metallurgical and Materials Transactions. He has published more than 250 papers in the field of Materials Science, with a major emphasis on phase transformations and the role of microstucture in controlling the extrinsic properties of magnetic materials.

Marc DeGraef is Associate Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. He is also Director of the J. Earle and Mary Roberts Materials Characterization Laboratory. He has published more than 90 papers in the field of Materials Science, with an emphasis on microstructural characterization in intermetallics and Lorentz observations on magnetic materials. He is currently writing an undergraduate level textbook on crystallography, symmetry and diffraction (M. McHenry coauthor).

Michael E. McHenry is Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Carnegie Mellon Univer-sity. He is also the Principal Investigator on the Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) on High Temperature Magnetic Materials of CMU and Editor for the Magnetism and Magnetic Materials and Intermag Conferences. He has published more than 150 papers in the field of Materials Science, with a major emphasis on microstucture/property relationships in magnetic and superconducting materials.



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