Where theory meets application
 
 

Material Science & Technology

Materials Science & Technology 2004

Where Theory Meets Application
Where Scientists Meet Engineers
Where Technology Meets the Future
Where You Need to Be!
 
 
September 26-29, 2004 • New Orleans, Louisiana
 
 

 

MS&T '04 will include the following symposia which have been developed to present both practical and theoretical accomplishments advancing both scientific understanding and industrial progress.

ALL-CONFERENCE OPENING PLENARY PRESENTATION: "Creating Customer Value—A Prescription for the Steel Industry" by James W. Griffith
Monday, September 27, 2004 • 8:30 AM-9:15 AM
Don’t call 911. The patient is the U.S. steel industry and it’s in critical condition. We are familiar with the obvious symptoms (structural excess capacity, low cost imports, legacy costs, etc.) of an industry in crisis. Underlying these symptoms is a more serious disease; the loss of market share due to the substitution of other materials such as plastics or aluminum. Curing the ills of the steel industry will involve a complex treatment, one that must include the development of products that create real customer value. But don’t call 911. Call the customer instead.

James W. GriffithJames W. Griffith has had extensive experience in manufacturing, international business and strategic management during his career with The Timken Company. Since joining the company in 1984, he has held positions as plant manager and vice president- manufacturing in North America and managing director of the company’s business in Australia. From 1996 to 1999, he led the automotive business in North America and had regional responsibility for the company’s businesses in Asia and Latin America. He had additional responsibility for the company’s rail business from 1996 to 1998. Mr. Griffith was elected president and chief operating officer and a director in 1999 and was elected chief executive officer in 2002. Prior to joining The Timken Company, Mr. Griffith held engineering and management positions at Homestake Mining Company, Bunker Hill Company and Martin Marietta. Mr. Griffith is a native of Wallace, Idaho. He received a bachelor’s degree in industrial engineering and an MBA from Stanford University. He is a member of the board of trustees of the United Way of Central Stark County, a member of the executive committee and board of trustees of the Manufacturers Alliance/MAPI and a member of the board of directors of Goodrich Corporation.

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3-Dimensional Materials Science
Sponsored by: TMS Structural Materials Division
In recent years, significant cant advances have been made in materials characterization, representation, and modeling. In particular, serial sectioning techniques and X-ray microtomography methods have been increasingly used to probe the 3-D microstructures of advanced materials such as structural foams, metallic and nonmetallic composites, and ferrous and non-ferrous alloys. These newer experimental techniques have had a powerful influence on the rapidly advancing field of computational materials science, where microstructural data can be input into models to gain new insight into deformation, processing, and phase transformations in these complex multi-phase materials systems. Computerization brings to the forefront a new problem, that of mathematical representation and manipulation of the data sets. An additional emphasis of the symposium will therefore be the development of methods for microstructural representation that will allow rapid diffusion of data throughout the materials science community, provide for automated data generation and handling and to allow for machine based decision making from microstructural information. This symposium is the third of a series of annual TMS symposia focusing on 3-dimensional aspects of materials science and its associated problems. It intends to bring together experimentalists and computational materials scientists with experts in 3-D techniques, virtual reality and advanced computer graphics, and representation. From this, it is intended to build a common basis for research topics that is truly interdisciplinary.

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Advancements in Mechanical Property Characterization at the Micro- and Nano-Scale
Sponsored by: TMS Structural Materials Division
The intent of this symposium is to highlight the current state-of-the- art for mechanical property characterization of ultra-small volumes of materials, specifically where the feature dimension overlaps with fundamental material length scales controlling physical properties. Recent advancements in micro-fabrication methods, micro-manipulation technologies, and mechanical testing instrumentation provide strategies for direct measurement of micron scale material volumes. This symposium focus is motivated by the continued development of technologies utilizing structural materials with micron-size dimensions (such as MEMS devices), the growing need for characterization methods to measure fundamental physical properties on micro-size volumes (potentially for combinatorial/rapid property evaluation programs), and the continuing scientific interest in the dimensional scaling effects on deformation processes.

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Applications of Orientation Microscopy Techniques to Phase Transformations
Sponsored by: TMS Materials Processing and Manufacturing Division—Phase Transformations Committee
Recent advances in techniques that determine (by x-ray or electron diffraction) the distribution and crystallographic orientation of phases within a material have greatly enhanced the ability to correlate microstructural phase distributions with their crystallography. This symposium focuses on the application of these techniques to advance the understanding of phase transformations, including solidification, precipitation, eutectoid decomposition, martensite formation and tempering, and massive transformations. Studies dealing only with recrystallization and other single phase microstructures are outside the scope of this symposium.

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Computational Microstructure Evolution in Steel
Sponsored by: TMS Structural Materials Division—Chemistry and Physics of Materials Committee, and Computational Materials Science and Engineering Committee
A wide spectrum of computational methods is being developed to study the evolution of microstructures during thermo-mechanical treatment. This symposium will survey the state of the art computational modeling of microstructure evolution in steels. Topics include, but are not limited to, the study of deformation, recrystallization, grain growth, phase transformation and precipitation processes during manufacturing and application of steel using any computational approach from the atomic to the continuum scale. Of particular interest are presentations that focus on meso- or micro-scale modeling. Authors have the option to submit a paper for publication in a special edition of Computational Materials Science.

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Continuous Casting Fundamentals
Sponsored by: AIST Divisions VI & VII; MS Solidification Committee and Process Modeling Analysis and Control Committee
Process technology advances are often based on improved knowledge of the underlying fundamentals gained through plant trials, laboratory experiments, and computations. This symposium intends to bring together researchers, engineers, operators, and suppliers from industry and academia to discuss recent fundamental and technological developments in the continuous casting of steel and other metal products. Topics include all aspects of continuous casting, including, but not limited to: clean steel technologies, metal delivery systems, nozzle and refractory design, mold powders, clogging, fluid flow, cooling, containment and control systems, solidification, oscillation practices, mold design, metallurgy, quality monitoring, and defect prevention. Papers to be presented include mechanisms, detection, and control of surface defects, inclusions, internal cracks, segregation, microstructure, and shape changes that arise during the continuous casting of billets, blooms, slabs, thin slabs, strip, and other shapes.

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Development and Application of Hot Rolled Flat Products
Sponsored by: AIST Divisions V, VI & VII
Hot rolled flat steel products find wide use in structural, pipe, tubing, and formed applications, and there is a continuing effort to convert cold roll applications to hot roll. Papers to be presented regard recent advancements in the control of microstructure and mechanical properties, as well as dimensions and surface quality, to meet the demands of final applications. Topics may include high strength, formability, weldability, dimensions and shape, scale and surface quality.

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Engineered Steel Surfaces
Sponsored by: AIST Division VI; TMS Corrosion and Environmental Effects Committee
A broad spectrum of engineered surfaces and surface treatments can be applied to steel systems to achieve unique properties that are not obtainable via conventional finish processing methods. Surface treatments can be designed to improve product service performance and life, reduce friction in manufacturing, or increase aesthetic appeal. The selection of an appropriate engineered surface depends highly on the steel product category and application. For example, sheet steels are often coated for lubricity or to accept paint. Gear or bearing steels may be carburized to improve fatigue and coated to reduce wear, friction or chemical attack. Papers by authors that work with any variety of steel product type will be presented in the areas of: development and application of the surface treatment to the steel substrate, characterization of engineered surface systems, and performance evaluation of engineered surface systems.

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General Abstracts
Sponsored by: AIST; TMS
development fields are rich with exciting technology. General abstracts on steels, steel processing, and steel products will be presented. Some examples might include papers on the manufacture or implementation of long products, sheet or plate products, ferrous physical metallurgy, steel process or product modeling, rolling technologies, roll materials and design technology, etc. The TMS Program Committee will present research as part of its most extensive program of general abstract sessions ever in an effort to present a more comprehensive view of current work being carried on in materials science research, particularly new and emerging technologies and techniques.

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General Poster Session
Sponsored by: AIST; TMS
Content to be determined.

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High Strain Rate Deformation and Deformation Mechanisms of Structural Steels
Sponsored by: AIST Division VI
High strain rate behavior of structural steels is considered relevant to crash worthiness of automotive steels, ballistic armor, and manufacturing of steel components (both at ambient and elevated temperatures). Papers will be presented in the area of high strain rate deformation of structural steels with special emphasis on the characterization of deformation properties and mechanisms high strain rate deformation. For this symposium, high strain rates are considered to be greater than 1 × 102.

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Intellectual Property Fundamentals for Materials Scientists and Managers
Sponsored by: TMS
This symposium will present a range of intellectual property matters of interest to practitioners in the materials field. Specific topics to be presented include: Patent basics; How to get a patent; Licensing and tech transfer; Tips and anecdotes from a patent examiner; Patent disputes—litigation and arbitration; Technical experts and witnesses in litigation; A judge’s view of patent cases; Trademark fundamentals.

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Materials Damage Prognosis
Sponsored by: TMS Structural Materials Division
This symposium will highlight scientific tools and approaches for development of a comprehensive damage prognosis technology for materials. The objective of such a prognosis capability is to enable continual assessment and prediction of the current and future health of materials in complex mechanical systems or subsystems, such as a turbine engine, helicopter drive train, or aircraft. The ultimate goal is the development of quantitative models that relate a system’s-level structural response to material’s-level microstructural conditions and events. Areas of emphasis include: (1) methods for in-situ interrogation of the damage state of a material, such as that from fatigue and/or creep, (2) physically-based models of the formation and growth of material damage under realistic loading, and (3) coupled state awareness and life models, including probabilistic and uncertainty approaches. The symposium is expected to attract participants from diverse but interdependent disciplines including materials science, mechanical engineering, mechanics, and physics, and electrical engineering.

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Mechanical Behavior of Body-Centered-Cubic (BCC) Metals and Alloys
Sponsored by: TMS Structural Materials Division — Mechanical Behavior of Materials Committee, Refractory Metals Committee, & Structural Materials Committee
This symposium will address the mechanical behavior of body-centered-cubic (BCC) metals and alloys. The objective of the symposium is to provide a forum for discussion between researchers from broad backgrounds on the mechanical behavior (including static, dynamic, and time dependent), constitutive modeling, and model validation of BCC-structured metals and alloys. Papers relating the chemistry, processing, microstructure, and loading variables to the macroscopic performance are of particular interest.

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Modeling and Computer Applications in Metal Casting, Shaping & Forming Processes
Sponsored by: AIST Divisions VI & VII; TMS Extraction and Processing Division, Materials Processing and Manufacturing Division—Process Modeling Analysis and Control Committee, Shaping and Forming Committee, Solidification Committee, and Computational Materials Science and Engineering Committee
This symposium intends to bring researchers and engineers together from industry and academia to discuss recent fundamental and technological developments in the manufacturing of ferrous and non-ferrous products, obtained from computer applications including numerical modeling of thermal, mechanical and metallurgical phenomena. Work will feature simulation, optimization, and on-line control of both current and novel processes to improve quality in the casting, rolling, shaping and forming of long metal products. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: 1) Continuous casting processes; 2) Casting of ingots and complex shapes; 3) Rolling, radial forging, cogging, and other manufacturing processes for long products; 4) Piercing, elongating, planetary rolling, reducing, stretch reducing, rotary sizing, straightening, and other manufacturing processes for tube products; 5) Controlled thermo-mechanical processing to obtain desired grain sizes, microstructures and mechanical properties in metal products; 6) Optimization of processes to produce defect free products; 7) Material property characterization to improve computational analysis programs, such as flow stress models, metallurgical models, etc.

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Pb-Free and Pb-Bearing Solders
Sponsored by: TMS Electronic, Magnetic and Photonic Materials Division—Electronic Packaging and Interconnection Materials Committee
This symposium will be aimed at providing a forum for exchange of ideas and recent findings in the currently popular field of electronic solders. It will consist of invited and contributed papers from leading research groups in the universities, national laboratories and industrial manufacturing facilities in the U.S. and abroad.

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Precipitation in Steels—Physical Metallurgy and Property Development
Sponsored by: AIST Divisions V & VI
Development of the appropriate microstructure is fundamental in the design of modern steels with desired mechanical properties for a given application. A factor playing a critical role in this development is the precipitation of desired or undesired species throughout the material’s processing stages. This symposium is aimed to revise the classical theory and examine new developments on the role of precipitation phenomena in the Processing/Property/Performance relationships of steels. Papers focusing on the fundamental metallurgy of the effect of ferritic or austenitic precipitation on the material mechanical properties such as strength, toughness, ductility, formability and weldability will be presented. Papers delineating the difference between the mere presence of precipitates and precipitation hardening are of particular interest to be presented. Emphasis should be placed on novel approaches to understanding, analyzing and/or exploiting precipitation in sheet products (e.g., ultra-low carbon, bakehardenable, HSLA, motor-lamination and enameling steels), or plate products (e.g., linepipe, structural, off-highway vehicles, etc.)

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Primary Operations and Product Quality
Sponsored by: AIST Division VI
Product quality can be significantly affected by the distribution of non-metallic inclusions inherited from liquid steel processing, the chemical segregation during solidification, the dimensions established during solidification, and by mechanical disturbances after solidification. Papers will be presented on operational techniques to improve quality, improved methods to measure quality in the semi-finished state, novel investigations into specific issues, or general schemes for investigation and classification Scientific as well as plant level papers regarding the effect of slags, refractories, steel chemistry, and equipment as well as the interaction with down-stream operations are included.

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Product Application and Development
Sponsored by: AIST Division VI
New or improved steel products are frequently designed either in direct partnership with customers, or to address a market need for a customers segment. Development of products, which meet application demands, requires interaction between raw material and equipment suppliers, mill/engineering activities, research and development, marketing and customers. Technological development is accelerated when customer needs are well understood and the customer is actively engaged. Papers will be presented in the areas of successful product development across a broad range of products. Co-Authorship between customer and supplier is desired, but not required. Examples could include, but are not limited to: university or national lab partnerships with industry, development and application of bar products for forged and heat treated components, development and application of automotive fl at rolled products, development and application of weldable plate steels, development and application of ferrous based aerospace alloys.

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Rhenium and Rhenium Containing Alloys
Sponsored by: TMS Structural Materials Division—Refractory Metals Committee
This symposium will provide a forum to discuss all aspects of rhenium and rhenium-containing alloys from extraction to purification, and includes powders, consolidation, processing, and applications. Of further interest are various alloys with the addition of rhenium, and will include nickel-based superalloys. The focus of symposia is to gain a greater understanding of rhenium and its various forms.

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Roll Technology
Sponsored by: AIST Division V
Papers to be presented include that discuss the following topics: innovation in roll manufacturing and roll testing, roll maintenance and inspection practices, roll use in the ferrous and non-ferrous industries, roll performance improvements and relationship between rolls and product attributes (profile, flatness, surface etc.).

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The Accelerated Implementation of Materials & Processes
Sponsored by: TMS Structural Materials Division—Chemistry and Physics of Materials Committee, Computational Materials Science and Engineering Committee; ASM/MSCTS—Thermodynamics and Phase Equilibria Committee
Emerging efforts in materials modeling are leading to incremental improvements in specific areas, (e.g., materials processing and mechanical behavior.) There is growing belief that the time scale between development of a new material and its implementation into production can be significantly shortened only through a revolutionary change in materials-development methodologies, which builds on such materials modeling. The resulting payoff will be a substantial reduction in the time required for the development of cost-competitive automotive and aerospace systems with higher performance and greater fuel efficiency. This is to be accomplished by using the required technical content and fidelity of the “designer knowledge base” to drive the optimized development/use of models and experiments. Critical to this effort will be understanding how to effectively use materials models, link them across various length and time scales and couple them with experiments to yield the appropriate information for the designer. In addition, methodologies to warrant the contents of the designer knowledge base against the uncertainties inherent in materials processing, characterization and testing must be developed. This symposium offers a view of approaches toward accelerated implementations of materials, and key technical limitations needing attention. Six sessions are anticipated with a number of invited speakers for each session. Topics of relevance include, but not limited to: Strategic development decisions for all materials, Development and reduction of insertion risk for, new materials, Improvement of workflow and productivity through digitization, Enhanced linkage of materials to design and customer requirements, Assessment and quantification of key uncertainty sources in materials processing, characterization and testing.

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The Effects of Microstructure and Property Homogeneity/Variability on Product Performance
Sponsored by: AIST Division VI
The supply of steels with more and more homogeneous (consistent) mechanical properties is becoming a main demand in steel industry. This implies the achievement of some minimum homogeneity both at macroscopic and microscopic scale in the microstructural parameters affecting mechanical behavior. Papers that cover aspects related to chemistry and process parameters for developing routes to achieve the aforementioned objectives will be presented. Property and microstructural homogeneity/variability papers will be presented for all product types and applications. Specific sessions are targeted in the areas of automotive flat rolled products and bar stock for forged components.

Long Products and Forged Components
Reduction of product variability for long products is critical both from a final property and processing consistency standpoint. Because of the complicated or variant cooling rate cross sections experienced in many long products and forgings, homogeneity must be addressed both in the cross sectional or part design as well as throughout the manufacturing process. Papers will be presented that address process controls from chemistry to final forgings to reduce variability both microscopically and macroscopically, or that discuss innovative ways to reduce the effects of chemistry and processing variability on final product properties. Papers will also be presented which address the effect(s) of homogeneity on downstream processing, or end product performance.

Flat Rolled Automotive Steels
Several factors contribute towards a robust (i.e., near-zero rejection rate) automotive stamping process. One factor is the consistency of the sheet steel products, not only in terms of the mechanical properties, but also the coating weight and structure, surface texture and lubrication. Another factor is the die design, for example, to control springback in high-strength steels. Papers that address the following topics will be presented in these technical sessions: relationships between mechanical properties and steel processing (including chemistry effects), performance characteristics (e.g., springback, hole expansion) of various high-strength steel grades, effects of coating structures, surface textures and lubrication on formability and stamping behavior, effect of post treatments, and developments in die design aimed at stamping new high-strength grades.

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Third International Symposium on Railroad Tank Cars
Sponsored by: AIST Division VI
This symposium will include presentations on developments and trends in railroad tank car technology. The focus will be on where the industry is heading with respect to design, materials, fabrication, and inspection of tank cars. Topics include ferrous and welding metallurgy, weldability, damage tolerance, inspection, new materials and manufacturing methods.

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Titanium for Healthcare, Biomedical, and Dental Applications
Sponsored by: TMS Structural Materials Division—Titanium Committee, Corrosion and Environmental Effects Committee; The Japan Institute of Metals (JIM)
In addition to the aerospace, automotive, and sports and recreation industries, uses of titanium and its alloys are expanding within the biomedical industry due to its exceptional properties and biocompatibility. This symposium will address uses of titanium for biomedical, dental, and healthcare applications. Papers will address such uses of titanium, and investigations relating processing, microstructure, properties, and behavior of titanium and titanium alloys, including beta, alpha + beta, intermetallic alloys as well as titanium matrix composites will be applicable. In addition, titanium used at the interface of biomedical components will be addressed.

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Use of Bainitic and Bainitic-Martensitic Steels in Current or Developing Applications
Sponsored by: AIST Division VI
Recent developments on the heat treatment of steels for bearing and other wear resistant parts have shown interesting properties associated with bainitic and bainitic-martensitic structures. Similarly, bainitic steels are being considered for power generation service at elevated temperature or cyclically loaded components. Conventional austempering, sub-Ms isothermal and multiple temperature isothermal heat treatments are being tried and tested against conventional quench and temper heat treatments. Papers to be presented deal with the structure and properties of steels as related to novel heat treatment procedures leading to bainitic and bainitic martensitic structures both on the surface and in the bulk, and mechanical components subject to severe service conditions.

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