Energy Conversion and Storage Committee

Technical Programming

2018 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Advanced Magnetic Materials for Energy and Power Conversion Applications: Organized by Orlando Rios; Francis Johnson; Paul Ohodnicki; Alex Leary; Ian Ashcroft

The accelerated expansion of global energy demands within the recent decade may be interpreted as an indicator of quality of life and the environment. Energy technologies hinge on efficient conversion and power densification. Engineering materials, some of which are subject to supply risks, price volatility, or concerns about long-term availability has been shown to have significant impacts on viability, reliability, and efficiency of power conversion. This symposium focuses on structure, property, processing, and performance interrelationships for emerging soft and hard magnetic materials systems as well as hybrid systems such as combined magnetocaloric and elastocaloric materials which are relevant for energy and power conversion applications. A special focus of this symposium will be targeted at advanced manufacturing approaches and the interface of engineered materials with device level performance and applications which rely on the fundamental magnetic interactions between structure and electromagnetic energy. We encourage topics that focus on the economically effects that critical materials have on manufacturing and adaptation of technologies and applications. The symposium will place a particular interest on emerging and established advanced manufacturing methods such as: 1. additive manufacturing, 2. top-down and bottom up bulk nano-manufacturing, 3. thermal-mechanical and thermal magnetic processing, and 4. energy dense processing such as RF, microwave, high pressure and high magnetic field processing.

2018 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Materials for Energy Conversion and Storage: Organized by Amit Pandey; Guihua Yu

Theme 1: Energy Conversion with emphasis on SOFCs. Co-organizers: Prof. Kyle S Brinkman, Clemson Univ., ksbrink@clemson.edu Prof. Hitoshi Takamura, Tohoku University, takamura@material.tohoku.ac.jp Prof. Xingbo Liu , West Virginia University , xingbo.liu@mail.wvu.edu Prof. Soumendra Basu, Boston University, basu@bu.edu Dr. Jung Pyung Choi, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, jungpyung.choi@pnnl.gov Prof. Prabhakar Singh, Univ. of Connecticut, singh@engr.uconn.edu Themes: These symposium topics include, but not limited to, experiments and modeling of the above-mentioned systems including, - Durability of fuel cell and stack materials - Thermal-Chemical-mechanical stresses/expansion - Study of thermo-mechanical degradation mechanisms. - Effect of microstructure evolution on the properties and efficiency. - Role of grain boundary density, grain size, orientation and grain growth. - Advances in the characterization and modeling techniques. Theme 2: Energy Storage with emphasis on Batteries Co-organizers: Prof. Partha P. Mukherjee, pmukherjee@tamu.edu Prof. Leela M. R. Arava, Wayne State University, larava@wayne.edu Prof. George Nelson, University of Alabama in Huntsville, george.nelson@uah.edu Topics will include: - Physicochemical Interaction in lithium-ion batteries and beyond (e.g. Li-S, Li-air, Na-ion) - Electrode microstructure - property - performance interplay - Meso-scale modeling and characterization Theme 3: Materials Design for Sustainability and Energy Harvesting Co-organizers: Dr. Surojit Gupta, University of North Dakota, surojit.gupta@engr.und.edu Dr. Indrajit Dutta, Corning Inc., DuttaI@corning.com Dr. Hamidreza Mohseni, BOSCH, Hamidreza.Mohseni@us.bosch.com Dr. D. Wen, University of Leeds, D.Wen@leeds.ac.uk Themes: Sustainability has become an integral component of research, and a critical issue for the growth and well-being of society. Some of the critical challenges are the rapid urbanization, a growing and aging population, the large amount of waste disposed to landfill, global impoverishing of natural resources and environment (fossil fuels, minerals, water and energy scarcity etc.), declining infrastructure, the emergency to control carbon dioxide emissions among others. These challenges have prompted – materials scientists and engineers to design “green” or environmentally benign technologies. This component of the symposium will focus on a variety of green and sustainable technologies for energy harvesting, additive manufacturing, green tribology, next generation products and processes, and development of advanced instrumentation and control systems etc. Proposed Session Topics - Solar Energy - Energy Harvesting - Nanotechnology and next generation multifunctional materials - Additive manufacturing, 3D printing, and sustainability - Green Tribology - Life cycle analysis of materials and products Theme 4: Functional Materials including High Temperature Ceramics and Alloys Co-organizers: Dr. Paul Ohodnicki, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Paul.Ohodnicki@netl.doe.gov Dr. Jung Pyung Choi, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, jungpyung.choi@pnnl.gov Prof. Reza Shahbazian-Yassar, University of Illinois at Chicago, rsyassar@uic.edu Prof. Soumendra Basu, Boston University, basu@bu.edu Prof. Dwayne Arola, Univ. of Washington, darola@uw.edu Prof. Josh Gladden, Olemiss, jgladden@olemiss.edu Prof. Rajeev Gupta, Univ. of Akron, rgupta@uakron.edu Materials / Applications: - Functional Oxides / (SOFC, Sensors, Others) - Ceramics and Dielectrics / (Battery, Insulation Dielectrics, Capacitors, Sensors) - Solid State Batteries/Electrolyzers/Solid oxide fuel cells/Membrane Separation/ electrolysis cells Topics will include: - Coatings for interconnections. - Membrane Separation Materials, Processes and Systems (H2, O2, CO2). - High temperature electrolysis cells. - High temperature performance of functional materials (electrochemical, electronic, optical, etc.) - In-situ spectroscopy of oxidation state of functional oxides in operation - Ceramics//Composite Structures/Alloys- Solid Oxide fuel cells, Thermal Barrier Coatings, Diesel particulate filters etc. - Reliability and durability of high-temperature ceramics and alloys, including the effect of residual/ operational stresses, corrosion under oxidizing and reducing environment. - Advances in the characterization and modeling techniques including multiscale and in-situ. - Microstructural reconstruction and mapping onto fundamental mechanistic models for predicting overall performance - Nanostructuring and infiltration of functional electrode materials (SOFC, battery, capacitor) for electronic / electrochemical performance The intent of this symposium is to provide a forum for researchers from national laboratories, universities, and industry to discuss current understanding of materials science issues in high-temperature processes and accelerate the development and acceptance of innovative materials and test techniques for clean energy technology.

2017 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Advanced Materials for Energy Conversion and Storage: Organized by Amit Pandey

Sponsor: Energy Conversion and Storage Committee (FMD) Co-Sponsor: High Temperature Alloys Committee (SMD) Theme 1- Lithium-ion batteries (Energy Storage) Co-Organizers i. Prof. Partha Mukherjee, pmukherjee@tamu.edu ii. Prof. Leela M. R. Arava, Wayne State University, fl8799@wayne.edu Topics will include: • Mechano-electrochemical interaction (microcrack formation for mechanical damage and solid electrolyte interphase formation for chemical degradation) • Electrode microstructure - property - performance interplay • Meso-scale modeling and characterization Theme 2- High Temperature Ceramics and Alloys Co-Organizers- i. Dr. Amit Pandey, Rolls Royce LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc., dramitpandey@gmail.com ii. Dr. Amit Shyam, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, shyama@ornl.gov iii. Dr. James W. Zimmermann, Corning Inc., ZimmermaJW@corning.com iv. Prof. Soumendra Basu, Boston University, basu@bu.edu Topics will include: • Ceramics//Composite Structures/Alloys- Solid Oxide fuel cells, Thermal Barrier Coatings, Diesel particulate filters etc. • Reliability and durability of high-temperature ceramics and alloys, including the effect of residual/ operational stresses, corrosion under oxidizing and reducing environment. • Advances in the characterization and modeling techniques including multiscale and in-situ. Theme 3- Functional Materials Co-Organizers- i. Dr. Paul Ohodnicki, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Paul.Ohodnicki@netl.doe.gov ii. Dr. Jung Pyung Choi, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, jungpyung.choi@pnnl.gov iii. Prof. Reza Shahbazian-Yassar, University of Illinois at Chicago, rsyassar@uic.edu iv. Prof. Soumendra Basu, Boston University, basu@bu.edu Materials / Applications: • Functional Oxides / (SOFC, Sensors, Others) • Ceramics and Dielectrics / (Battery, Insulation Dielectrics, Capacitors, Sensors) • Solid State Batteries/Electrolyzers/Solid oxide fuel cells/Membrane Separation/ electrolysis cells Topics will include: • Coatings for interconnections. • Membrane Separation Materials, Processes and Systems (H2, O2, CO2). • High temperature electrolysis cells. • High temperature performance of functional materials (electrochemical, electronic, optical, etc.) • In-situ spectroscopy of oxidation state of functional oxides in operation • Microstructural reconstruction and mapping onto fundamental mechanistic models for predicting overall performance • Nanostructuring and infiltration of functional electrode materials (SOFC, battery, capacitor) for electronic / electrochemical performance he intent of this symposium is to provide a forum for researchers from national laboratories, universities, and industry to discuss current understanding of materials science issues in high-temperature processes and accelerate the development and acceptance of innovative materials and test techniques for clean energy technology.

2017 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Materials Engineering of Soft Magnets for Power and Energy Applications: Organized by Paul Ohodnicki; Francis Johnson; Alex Leary; Tanjore Jayaraman; Lajos Varga

A number of societal trends are driving the need for advanced soft magnetic alloys and ceramic materials for emerging energy and power applications. For example, modernization of an aging transmission and distribution system to allow for increased penetration of renewables while retaining or improving resiliency, reliability, and efficiency will require advances in power electronics converters, power flow controllers and sensors, and grid asset monitoring sensors. Similarly, a trend towards electrification of the transportation fleet spanning automotive, aerospace, aviation, and nautical industries is placing increasing demands on higher power density and, in some cases, higher operational temperature power electronics converters. In the case of rotating electrical machinery such as industrial motors and wind generators, reduced energy intensity and CO2 emissions combined with an increased power density are obtainable but require an increase in the rotational speeds and/or broader deployment of variable frequency drives. To address the technical requirements imposed by emerging needs, improved soft magnets and an improved understanding of their fundamental magnetization processes under application relevant conditions as a function of structure, property, and processing will be required. This symposium will focus on applied physics and materials engineering principles of metallic and ceramic soft magnets relevant to emerging energy and power applications. Structure, processing, and performance interrelationships will be explored in the context of emerging end-use application needs. In particular, an emphasis will be placed on the development of new insights into the impacts of structure and processing on detailed magnetization processes of metallic and ceramic soft magnets under application relevant conditions.

2016 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: High-Temperature Systems for Energy Conversion and Storage: Organized by Amit Pandey; Amit Shyam; Kyle Brinkman; Paul Ohodnicki; Jung Pyung Choi

Scope: Functional ceramic materials play an essential role in a number of energy storage and conversion systems including 1. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), 2. High temperature batteries, 3. Membrane Separation Materials, Processes and Systems (H2, O2, CO2) 4. General characterizations of ceramic materials (electrical, thermal, microstructural and chemical) 5. High temperature electrolysis cells. 6. Thermal barrier Coatings, and 7. Combustion and control sensors. 8. Nanomaterial for high temperature applications. Themes: These symposium topics include, but not limited to, experiments and modeling of the above mentioned systems including, 1. Multiscale modelling and experiments (including in-situ) at various length scale. 2. Thermal-Chemical-mechanical stresses/expansion 3. Study of thermo-mechanical degradation mechanisms. 4. Effect of microstructure evolution on the properties and efficiency. 5. Role of grain boundary density, grain size, orientation and grain growth. 6. Advances in the characterization and modeling techniques. 7. Reliability and durability of component and sub-systems. The intent is to provide a forum for researchers from national laboratories, universities, and industry to discuss current understanding of materials science issues in high temperature processes, and accelerate the development and acceptance of innovative materials and test techniques for clean energy technology.

2015 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: 2015 Functional Nanomaterials: Energy and Sensing: Organized by Jung-Kun Lee; Behrang Hamadani; Sung Hun Wee; Nitin Chopra; Terry Xu; Jang-Sik Lee

This symposium will address unique functional properties of nanomaterials with an emphasis on energy, sensing, and data storage applications. Nanomaterials are a class of materials with morphology, properties, and structure or performance dominated by phenomena attributed to the “nano” length scale (<100 nm). These emerging materials enable new opportunities for future technological innovation, because they exhibit novel electrical, optical and magnetic properties that are absent in their bulk counterparts. 2015 symposium will be focused on the use of functional nanomaterials for energy conversion/storage and optical/electric/magnetic signal sensing. One session of the symposium is jointly hosted with Energy Conversion and Storage committee. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to: • Design and synthesis of nanostructured materials for energy, sensing and data storage • Novel physical and chemical behaviors of nanomaterials underlying energy conversion and storage • Nanoscale characterization of energy transport in the form of electrons and phonons • Enhancement of sensing sensitivity by surface plasmon resonance of nanomaterials • Applications to biological and chemical sensing of electronic, magnetic, optical and thermal phenomena • Nanomaterials for high temperature energy and sensing • Dynamic probing of microstructure evolution in functional nanomaterials Invited speakers include: Prof. Eray Aydil (University of Minnesota), Prof. Nam-Gyu Park (Sungkyunkwan University), Dr. Kai Zhu (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), Prof. KJ Cho (University of Texas at Dallas), Dr. Alec Talin (Sandia National Laboratories), Prof. Yong Zhu (North Carolina State University), Prof. Jeremy Munday (University of Maryland), Prof. Yiping Zhao (The University of Georgia Athens), Prof. Sudipta Seal (University of Central Florida), Dr. JaeYong Song (Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science)

2015 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Advanced Materials for Power Electronics, Power Conditioning, and Power Conversion III: Organized by Paul Ohodnicki; Michael Lanagan; Michael McHenry; Rachael Myers-Ward; Clive Randall; Matthew Willard; Ty McNutt

Independent of the means by which electrical power is generated (conventional fossil, advanced fossil, nuclear, solar, wind, etc.), power conditioning and conversion is required to transform power into an appropriate form for efficient and cost-effective integration into the grid. By 2030, it is also projected that 80% of all electricity will flow through power electronics. Advanced materials including soft magnetic materials, semiconductors, and dielectric materials for capacitors are crucial for enabling the next generation of advanced power electronics technologies. These technical communities have historically worked independent of one another and materials development efforts have often been carried out in the absence of frequent and meaningful interactions with the power electronics community. The proposed symposium aims to bridge these historical gaps through a number of technical symposia devoted to relevant materials systems including soft magnets, dielectric materials for capacitors, and semiconductor materials. The primary focus of the proposed symposium will be in the area of advanced materials for power electronics and power conditioning systems. A range of invited and contributed talks will be presented by the top materials scientists in each field. To supplement the traditional technical sessions, a selected group of technical experts from the power electronics community will also be invited to present and to engage the materials community. These invited talks are intended to promote interactions between the materials and power electronics communities, to educate the materials community about critical materials needs, and to educate the power electronics community about state-of-the-art material developments.

2015 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: High-Temperature Systems for Energy Conversion and Storage: Organized by Amit Pandey; Kyle Brinkman; Paul Ohodnicki; Amit Shyam; Jung Pyung Choi

Scope: Functional ceramic materials play an essential role in a number of energy storage and conversion systems including 1. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), 2. High temperature batteries, 3. Membrane Separation Materials, Processes and Systems (H2, O2, CO2) 4. General characterizations of ceramic materials (electrical, thermal, microstructural and chemical) 5. High temperature electrolysis cells. 6. Thermal barrier Coatings, and 7. Combustion and control sensors. 8. Nanomaterial for high temperature applications. Themes: These symposium topics include, but not limited to, experiments and modeling of the above mentioned systems including, 1. Multiscale modelling and experiments (including in-situ) at various length scale. 2. Thermal-Chemical-mechanical stresses/expansion 3. Study of thermo-mechanical degradation mechanisms. 4. Effect of microstructure evolution on the properties and efficiency. 5. Role of grain boundary density, grain size, orientation and grain growth. 6. Advances in the characterization and modeling techniques. 7. Reliability and durability of component and sub-systems. The intent is to provide a forum for researchers from national laboratories, universities, and industry to discuss current understanding of materials science issues in high temperature processes, and accelerate the development and acceptance of innovative materials and test techniques for clean energy technology.

2015 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Nanostructured Materials for Rechargeable Batteries and for Supercapacitors III: Organized by Reza Shahbazian-Yassar; Yan Yao; David Mitlin

This session will cover multiple experimental and theoretical aspects of nanomaterials for rechargeable batteries (Li-ion, Li-Air, Li-Sulfur, Na-ion, Mg-ion, etc) and for supercapacitors. Nanostructured materials hold great promise for energy storage applications, possessing both obvious intrinsic advantages and obvious intrinsic disadvantages. These systems have nanometer-scale diffusion distances and extremely high surface-to-volume ratios. On the up side this allows for exquisite kinetics, potentially altered thermodynamics, and near theoretical electrochemical activities. On the down side such systems often display markedly accelerated rates of microstructural degradation, and are prone to extensive parasitic side reactions. The talks, which will be mostly Invited, will focus on the unique “nano” aspects of these technologies. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, synthesis of new or improved anode/cathode materials and architectures, integration of such structures into working devices, electronic structure or electrical performance simulation, degradation testing and modeling, microstructural analysis by techniques such as TEM or XPS, new chemical synthesis routes, utilization of novel carbon allotropes such as graphene and carbon nanotubes, synthesis and application of high performance biochars with tuned porosity and surface functionality, Si and Ge nanowires, novel oxides for positive electrodes, core-shell and double core-shell architectures, sulfide-based electrodes, SEI layer formation, hybrid oxide - carbon systems, the use of ionic liquid electrolytes, nitride-based electrodes, and flexible devices.

2015 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Structural Materials, Heat Transport Fluids, and Novel System Designs for High Power and Process Heat Generation: Organized by Peter Hosemann; Peiwen Li; Kumar Sridharan; Bruce Pint

High temperature sources are desirable for a wide range of engineering and industrial applications. Many renewable energy systems have the potential to develop a heat source for desirable high temperatures. Especially with the development of new Nuclear Power (NP), Clean Coal (CC) concepts as well as Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) concepts with high temperatures for process heat, hydrogen generation or efficient energy storage become viable options. The push to higher temperatures (>750oC) increases the need for different heat transport fluids and raises the question of the limits of structural materials available and deployed today. Harsh environments (temperature, corrosion, stress from flow of heat transport fluids, time, cost, pressure and cyclic loading) make this application challenging for the materials deployed and the limit of what conventional materials may be exceeded. In this symposium, we are providing a platform for a thorough discussion of all materials aspects associated with high temperature heat transport systems especially deployed in CSP,NP and CC systems with a particular focus on the structural materials. We are inviting application oriented papers as well as fundamental scientific contributions associated with interaction of structural materials with novel heat transport fluids (liquid salt, liquid metal, hydrocarbon, supercritical steam, supercritical CO2, etc.) including new heat transfer design concepts . Mechanical strength, high temperature durability as well as corrosion resistance of structural materials in any of the environments listed are of interest. 1) Expected session topics include: Materials for very high temperature heat transport systems with novel heat transport media, including but not limited to liquid metal, salt, sand, supercritical CO2. 2) Materials in high temperature, high pressure water systems 3) High temperature properties of the structural materials, including thermal cycling 4) Fundamental aspects of chemistry control to prevent corrosion in these systems. 5) Materials needs for new heat transfer designs It is the intention to focus on the specific issues associated with this application with solid material science background and to explore potentially unusual solutions and approaches. This symposium intends to bring together applied materials engineers as well as basic material scientists.