Nanomechanical Materials Behavior Committee

Technical Programming

2018 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Fracture: 65 Years after the Weibull Distribution and the Williams Singularity: Organized by Brad Boyce; Ellen Cerreta; Jacob Hochhalter; Jonathan Zimmerman

In 1951, Waloddi Weibull published a single-author paper describing a new statistical distribution “of wide applicability” in the Journal of Applied Mechanics. The very next year in the same journal, Max Williams published a single-author paper describing an analytic stress singularity that has become the foundation of linear elastic fracture mechanics. The Weibull distribution provides a stress-based method for assessing the statistics of failure whereas the Williams singularity provides a deterministic description of the stress field at a crack tip that drives fracture. While the two approaches are quite different, they both continue to be profoundly useful for engineering design. The symposium will focus on application of these methods to materials science, the limitations of these methods and nuance that has been unearthed after 65 years of use. How have these methods assisted in the development of improved engineering materials and more reliable engineered structures? What recent analysis methods for material failure might have a similar impact 65 years from now? Why is recent research not as readily adopted by broad engineering practice? What are the current generational challenges in fracture and material failure?

2018 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Mechanical Behavior at the Nanoscale IV: Organized by Christopher Weinberger; Qian Yu; Garritt Tucker; Nan Li; Yu Zou; Jonathan Zimmerman; Scott Mao

Understanding the mechanics of materials in small volumes is of fundamental importance because it simultaneously allows for the exploration of new properties at the smallest of length scales as well as provides a basis for understanding multiscale phenomena that originate at these lengthscales. This symposium will focus on the mechanical properties of small-volume and low-dimensional materials, as well as bulk materials that are comprised of or are aggregates of these materials including bulk nanostructured materials and nanoscale based heirarchical materials. Of particular interest are studies that discuss sample size effects, applications of nanoscale mechanical testing and the associated characterization, as well as modeling that addresses the mechanical properties of these materials. Properties of interest include, but are not limited to: elasticity, strength, plastic flow, fatigue, and fracture with material systems ranging from hard materials, including metals and ceramics, to soft and biological materials. Topics will include: - Size effects on elasticity, strength, plastic flow, fracture and fatigue in low dimensional materials including nanopillars, nanowires, nanoparticles, thin films, multilayered materials, graded materials, and architecture-designed materials. - Changes in deformation types or patterns due to changes in scale including those due to size affected phase transformations, changes in density and types of interfaces, as well as available deformation sources. - Ex-situ and in-situ (SEM, TEM, XRD, neutron, etc.) mechanical characterization methods. - Modeling and simulation at all scales, as well as coupled scale modeling, of mechanical behavior of nanostructured materials - Confinement and size effects in glasses and disordered media. - Small scale mechanics of soft matter: polymers, and biomaterials (e.g collagen, chitin, and keratin, as well as other organic materials).

2018 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Ultrafine-grained Materials X: Organized by Suveen Mathaudhu; Irene Beyerlein; Avinash Dongare; Chong Soo Lee; Terry Lowe; Srikanth Patala; Lee Semiatin; Jason Trelewicz; Janelle Wharry; Caizhi Zhou

This is the tenth international symposium that focuses on all aspects of the science and technology of ultrafine grained (UFG) and nanocrystalline materials. This symposium covers a broad scope, ranging from fundamental science to applications of bulk ultrafine-grained (grain size <1000 nm) and nanostructured (feature size <100 nm) materials. It provides a forum on the topics of fabrication and understanding of UFG and nanocrystalline materials including conventional and emerging technologies and advancements, fundamental issues in severe plastic deformation (SPD) processing and SPD-processed materials, UFG and nanocrystalline microstructure evolution, mechanical and physical properties, deformation mechanisms, superplasticity, joining and bonding, computational and analytical modeling, structural and functional applications, etc. Other emerging topics to be covered include gradient and layered nanostructures, vapor-phase processing, powder processing, rapid-solidification methods, bio-inspired nanomaterials, and radiation tolerant nanomaterials. Also, in honor of the 10th iteration of this symposium, we will hold a “Pioneers of Ultrafine Grained Materials” session that will highlight the contributions of the superheroes of this field. Awards: UFG X will be hosting a Young Scientist Session for students or post-docs within three years of receiving their Ph.D. There will be up to two Gold Medals and three Silver Medals for best oral presentation. Awards will also be given for best poster (One Gold Medal and two Silver Medals). A committee that includes the symposium organizers and invited speakers will decide the awards. Each medalist will receive a certificate, and may receive a cash prize, depending on resources available.

2017 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Advanced Thermo-mechanical Characterization of Materials with Special Emphasis on In Situ Techniques: Organized by Amit Pandey; Sanjit Bhowmick; Jeff Wheeler; Mar�a Teresa P�rez Prado; Robert Wheeler; Josh Kacher

The focus of this symposium is to discuss current research and key developments in techniques and experimental methods to measure thermo-mechanical properties of materials in situ and ex situ in application-orientated environments. These environments may include, but not limited to high temperature, cryogenic temperature, electrical and magnetic field, gas, radiation, chemical, pressure extremes, and humidity. In situ mechanical testing techniques using SEM, TEM, AFM, Raman, synchrotron, X-ray, IR, and FTIR are becoming increasingly popular for studying mechanical behavior of materials. Many such techniques have been developed to probe material response to stimuli across nano- to macro-length scales. The intent of the symposium is to provide a forum for researchers from national laboratories, academia, and industry to discuss research progress in the area of in operando and/or in-situ mechanical testing for nanomechanical studies, and to accelerate the development and acceptance of innovative materials and testing techniques. Topics include: Development of instruments and experimental methodology for in situ techniques and/or testing at non-ambient conditions. Mechanics of deformation of high-temperature materials, high-strength materials, thin films, 1D, 2D, and other low-dimension nanostructures, and interfaces. Imaging and analytical techniques to correlate microstructure, defects, crystal orientation, and strain field with mechanical properties. Microstructural observations using in situ techniques across length scales.

2017 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Fracture Properties and Residual Stresses in Small Dimensions: Organized by Daniel Kiener; Marco Sebastiani; Nagamani Jaya Balila; William Gerberich; Siddhartha (Sid) Pathak

Fracture properties have been a long-standing issue in materials science. Nowadays, with the ongoing miniaturization trends and observation of size dependent brittle to ductile transitions, the determination of fracture properties and residual stress in ever-smaller dimensions is evolving as a highly active field within the small-scale testing community. In this symposium, we want to highlight novel strategies for the experimental determination of fracture properties, as well as new concepts to evaluate small-scale experiments in the elastic and elasto-plastic domains. Contributions that address, for example, the fracture properties of confined volumes, interfaces, nanocrystalline materials, multilayered structures, or the influence of residual stresses, temperature, or environment on these fracture properties are welcome. Moreover, in-situ testing approaches as well as computational studies that unravel the underlying elemental fracture properties in small volumes are invited.

2017 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Interface-Mediated Properties of Nanostructured Materials: Organized by Caizhi Zhou; Nan Li; Peter Anderson; Michael Demkowicz

Advanced nanostructured materials, such as metallic nanolayered composites, nanograined and nanotwinned metals, core/shell wires and nanostructured coatings, have drawn increased attention from the materials science community because of their potential for ultrahigh strength, increased ductility, thermal stability and elevated fracture toughness. Fundamental barriers must be resolved to manufacture such advanced nanostructured materials in bulk form and at reduced cost. Significant research has been conducted in recent years to understand the underlying mechanisms that control the mechanical behavior of these advanced nanostructured materials. Both experiments and modeling have revealed that as microstructure length-scales are reduced from micrometer- to nanometer levels, interfaces, such as grain boundaries and phase boundaries, become crucial in determining the mechanical behavior of nanostructured materials. This symposium solicits submissions from both the experimental and modeling communities whose research addresses the deformation and fracture of nanostructured materials and the correlation with structure and processing. Specific topics include but are not limited to: - Defect-interface interactions - Mechanical instabilities such as shear band formation or necking - In-situ techniques for mechanical testing of nanostructured materials - Atomistic simulations to understand unit deformation mechanisms as well as collective behaviors - Multiscale modeling of deformation and fracture of nanostructured materials

2017 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Mechanical Behavior of Nanostructured Materials: Organized by Xinghang Zhang; Yuntian Zhu; Joseph Poon; Suryanarayana Challapalli; Enrique Lavernia; Haiyan Wang

This symposium will honor the outstanding contributions of Prof. Carl C. Koch to many fields in materials science in the last 50 years and celebrate his 80th birthday. In particular, his pioneering research in the areas of synthesis and processing of nanostructured and amorphous materials using mechanical alloying has led to a new paradigm in the field of nanomaterials research. His recent research has focused on synthesis, microstructure and mechanical behavior of bulk nanostructured materials, metallic glasses and high entropy alloys. The symposium will focus on experimental, theoretical and computational studies related to nanostructured materials, amorphous metals and high entropy alloys in the form of bulk, thin films and coatings. These studies will include, but are not limited to, the following subject areas: (1) synthesis and microstructural characterization of advanced materials (2) deformation, plasticity and creep in nanomaterials (3) fatigue and fracture (4) nanomechanics, (5) thermal stability (6) radiation damage in materials (7) advanced characterization techniques, including in situ techniques and advances in nanomechanical testing techniques; (8) multifunctional nanomaterials (including but not limited to magnetic materials, metamaterials and thermoelectric materials), (9) theoretical, computational and analytical modeling of mechanical properties in small dimensions. Papers from this symposium are planned to be published in a special issue of a peer reviewed materials science journal. Confirmed Invited Speakers: Don Brenner, North Carolina State University J. Eckert, Erich Schmid Institute of Materials Science, Leoben, Austria Kevin Hemker, John Hopkins University Terry Langdon, University of Southern California John Lewandowski, Case Western Reserve Mo Li, Georgia Tech Peter Liaw, University of Tennessee K. Lu, Institute of Metal Research Farghalli Mohamed, University of California, Irvine B.S. Murty, Indian Institute of Technology Madras Reinhard Pippan, Erich-Schmid-Instituteof Materials Science, Leoben, Austria T. D. Shen, Yanshan University Frans Spaepen, Harvard University Michael Zehetbauer, University of Vienna D. L. Zhang, Shanghai Jiaotong University

2017 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Nanostructured Materials for Nuclear Applications II: Organized by Cheng Sun; Khalid Hattar; Celine Hin ; Fei Gao ; Osman Anderoglu ; Mitra Taheri ; Haiming Wen

A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is to discover advanced materials that can operate reliably in extreme service conditions, i.e. neutron, high temperatures, corrosive environments, etc. nanostructured materials with a high volume fraction of buried interfaces are theorized to have improved resistance to irradiation. Thus, there is an increasing need to understand how interfacial structures mitigate radiation-induced damage and to design stable nanostructured materials that can survive in these severe irradiation conditions. The aim of this symposium is to provide a forum for the discussion on nanostructured materials stability under extreme conditions. This includes understanding the role of grain boundary and interfacial structures and chemistry on the radiation tolerance and microstructural stability. Presentations on experimental, theoretical, and modeling research are solicited. Topic areas for this symposium include, but are not limited to: 1. Manufacturing, characterization, and mechanical testing of nano-engineered materials. 2. Radiation damage of nano-featured materials, including nanoparticle-dispersion-strengthened composites, nanocrystalline materials, multilayer structured materials etc. 3. The effects of interfaces (free surfaces, grain boundaries, phase boundaries, etc) on the radiation tolerance of materials 4. Nano-mechanical testing of irradiated materials. 5. Nanostructured waste form materials and fuels. (Joint session with symposium: “Ceramic Materials for Nuclear Energy Research and Applications”) 6. Atom probe tomography characterization of irradiated materials. (Joint session with symposium: “Alloy Phase Chemistry at the Atomic Level: Opportunities and Challenges”)

2016 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: In Operando Nano- and Micro-mechanical Characterization of Materials with Special Emphasis on In Situ Techniques: Organized by Sanjit Bhowmick; Amit Pandey; Vikas Tomar; Vikram Jayaram; Benjamin Morrow; Paul Shade; Weizhong Han; Arief Budiman

The focus of this symposium is to discuss current research and key developments in techniques and experimental methods to measure mechanical properties of materials in situ and ex situ in application-orientated environments. These environments may include, but not limited to high temperature, cryogenic temperature, electrical and magnetic field, gas, radiation, chemical, pressure extremes, and humidity. In situ mechanical testing techniques using SEM, TEM, AFM, Raman, synchrotron, X-ray, IR, and FTIR are becoming increasingly popular for studying mechanical behavior of materials. Many such techniques have been developed to probe material response to stimuli across nano- to macro-length scales. While the practice of performing experiments inside an electron microscope to probe material response under direct observation has been around for decades, recent advances in mechanical testing instrumentation, microscopy techniques, analytical detectors, high-speed cameras, computing resources, and various types of spectroscopy are now able to provide unprecedented insight and fundamental understanding of elasticity, plasticity, fracture, wear, phase transformations, irradiation damage effects, recovery and recrystallization, and creep of materials. The intent of the symposium is to provide a forum for researchers from national laboratories, academia, and industry to discuss research progress in the area of in operando and/or in-situ mechanical testing for nanomechanical studies, and to accelerate the development and acceptance of innovative materials and testing techniques.

2016 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Mechanical Behavior at the Nanoscale III: Organized by Jonathan Zimmerman; Daniel Gianola; Ting Zhu; Julia Greer; Harold Park; Garritt Tucker; Jiangwei Wang

This symposium focuses on materials that exhibit mechanical behavior and properties dominated by geometric and structural features at the nanometer scale. Research, development and application of materials characterized by small volumes or reduced dimensionality – such as nanoparticles, nanowires, nanotubes, pillars, sheets and thin films – are of interest, as are microscale and bulk specimens that are characterized by an underlying material structure of nanoscale feature length, for example nanocrystals, nanolaminates/multilayer thick films and nanoporous foams. This symposium will cover observations of the mechanical behavior of nanoscale materials, through experiments and numerical simulations, as well as tools and techniques used to make those observations and develop a clearer understanding of the underlying physics and mechanics of material deformation. The symposium invites papers that cover topics that include: - Unique mechanical behavior due to geometric (specimen) size effects - Mechanical properties of elasticity, strength, plastic flow, fatigue and fracture that are highly influenced by nanoscale geometric and structural features - Nanoscale mechanical testing - In-situ testing and characterization of nanoscale materials and structures - Atomistic and nanoscale modeling and simulation of material behavior -Development of micro/macro-scale models of material behavior that incorporate nanomechanical deformation mechanisms - Application of nanoscale materials in technology (e.g. MEMS/NEMS)

2016 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Nanostructured Materials for Nuclear Applications: Organized by Cheng Sun; Michael Demkowicz; Amit Misra; Osman Anderoglu; Khalid Hattar

A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is to discover advanced materials that can operate reliably in extreme service conditions, i.e. under high-dose neutron irradiation at high temperatures and in corrosive environments. Nanostructured materials with a high volume fraction of buried interfaces are believed to have improved resistance to irradiation. Thus, there is an increasing need to understand how interfacial structures mitigate radiation-induced damage and to design stable nanostructured materials that can survive in severe irradiation conditions. The aim of this symposium is to provide a forum for the discussion of irradiation response of nanostructured materials and the stability of the corresponding interfacial structures. Presentations on experimental, theoretical, and modeling research are solicited. Topic areas for this symposium include, but are not limited to: 1.Processing, characterization, and testing of nanostructured nuclear materials. 2.Radiation damage of nano-structured metals, ceramics, and composites. 3.Radiation response of nanowire, nanoparticles, and nanoporous solids. 4.Effect of local interface chemistry on radiation response and properties. 5.Nano-mechanical measurements of irradiated materials. 6.The effects of surfaces, grain boundaries, and phase boundaries on radiation response.

2016 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Ultrafine Grained Materials IX: Organized by Suveen Mathaudhu; Irene Beyerlein; Roberto Figueiredo; Zenji Horita; Megumi Kawasaki; Qizhen Li; Hans Roven; Timothy Rupert

This is the ninth international symposium that focuses on all aspects of science and technology of ultrafine grained (UFG) and nanocrystalline materials. This symposium covers a broad scope, ranging from fundamental science to applications of bulk ultrafine-grained (grain size <1000 nm) and nanostructured (feature size <100 nm) materials. It provides a forum on the topics of fabrication and understanding of UFG and nanocrystalline materials including conventional and emerging technologies and advancements, fundamental issues in severe plastic deformation (SPD) processing and SPD-processed materials, UFG and nanocrystalline microstructure evolution, mechanical and physical properties, deformation mechanisms, superplasticity, joining and bonding, computational and analytical modeling, structural and functional applications, etc. Other emerging topics to be covered include gradient and layered nanostructures, stability of nanostructured materials, powder processing and bio-inspired nanomaterials. Awards: UFG IX will be hosting a Young Scientist Session for students or post-docs within three years of receiving their Ph.D. There will be up to two Gold Medals and three Silver Medals for best oral presentation. Awards will also be given for best poster (One Gold Medal and two Silver Medals). A committee that includes the symposium organizers and invited speakers will decide the awards. Each medalist will receive a certificate, and may receive a cash prize, depending on resources available.

2015 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Advanced Materials and Reservoir Engineering for Extreme Oil & Gas Environments II: Organized by Indranil Roy; Xinghang Zhang; Ting Chen; Greg Kusinski; Jefferson Rodrigues; Hani Elshahawi

Advanced Materials and Reservoir Engineering for Extreme Oil & Gas Environments - II was started as the first TMS International Symposium in 2013, focusing on the Science and Technology of Advanced Materials, particularly metallic materials such as ultrafine grained (UFG), nanocrystalline (nc), nano-reinforced metallic and non-metallic composites encompassing the critical aspects of reservoir engineering in hostile environments. Continuing on the legacy of success AMREE Oil & Gas, the symposium will be organized every alternate year. With the accelerating development of high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) reservoirs (pressure > 20kpsi, temperature > 350 degF), the Oil &Gas industry faces not only new materials-related challenges but also questions regarding reservoir characteristics, resulting in the increased use of costly and more exotic materials. Nanostructured and advanced materials potentially offer new possibilities in drilling, exploration and production. In this symposium both academia and industry are invited to discuss and review the topic of extreme environment as an input to the design of novel materials for Oil & Gas applications. This symposium will cover the following topics: Nanostructured, UFG and advanced oilfield materials for structural and functional applications Emerging technologies in the advancements in UFG/nc-materials Carbon nano-tube, graphene, and nano-reinforced materials Corrosion, environmentally-assisted cracking and materials degradation Processing and property-enhancement by severe plastic deformation (SPD) Properties: physical, mechanical including deformation mechanisms Multifunctional nano-scale coatings and surface treatments High-temperature electronic materials Advanced non-metallic materials, including polymers and cements Reliability and materials failures Computational and analytical modeling Reservoir characteristics, phase behavior and challenges for hostile Oil & Gas reservoirs This symposium includes 6 sessions, consisting of invited and contributed oral presentations. A panel discussion is planned at the end of the symposium. Awards: AMREE Oil & Gas II will be hosting a Young Scientist Session for students or post-docs within three years of their Ph.D. Up to two Gold Medals and three Silver Medals wll be presented for best oral presentation. Awards will also be given for best poster (one Gold Medal and a Silver Medal). The awards will be decided by a committee which includes the symposium organizers and invited speakers. Each medalist will receive a certificate. NOTE: If you would like to be considered for the Young Scientist Session, please indicate this on your submitted Abstract. Selected papers will be published in a special issued of a leading journal based on a rigorous peer review procedure.

2015 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Dynamic Probing of Microstructure Evolution in Nanostructured Materials: Organized by Nan Li; Caizhi Zhou; Dan Gianola; Marc Legros

Microstructure evolution occurs in nanostructured materials by a wide range of mechanisms. Those strongly impact their mechanical behavior under external loading. Significant advances in dynamic in-situ electron microscopy (including both SEM and TEM) have recently emerged. They represent a new opportunity to investigate the response of nanostructured materials under various external stimuli that can be mechanical, thermal, electrical, irradiative and/or corrosive. The information provided by dynamic in-situ electron microscopy, in combination with materials modeling and simulations, will be the scientific underpinning to design nanostructured materials with tailored mechanical response for future engineering applications. This symposium aims to bring together researchers in the field of experimental and computational materials mechanics with a focus on understanding the mechanical behavior of materials at micro/nano scales. The subject areas of the symposium include, but are not limited to: ➢ Experiments – In-situ mechanical test at micro/nano scales; In-situ microscopy under radiation and corrosive environments; new In-situ techniques/novel instrumental designs; ➢ Modeling and Simulations – atomistic modeling and simulations, phase field modeling, dislocation dynamics simulations, crystal plasticity modeling and simulations; ➢ Deformation mechanisms – dislocation plasticity, twinning, phase transformation, fatigue and fracture.