Shaping and Forming Committee

Technical Programming

2018 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Additive Manufacturing of Metals: Establishing Location Specific, Processing-Microstructure-Property-Relationships III: Organized by Eric Lass; Mark Stoudt; Judith Schneider; Lee Semiatin; Behrang Poorganji; Clay Houser

Advances in additive manufacturing (AM) technology have created the ability to design and construct components with geometries and properties that cannot be achieved through traditional solidification and deformation processes. This ability has promoted multiple new design strategies whose success relies on close integration of engineering and materials science. An additional attractive aspect of additive processing is the ability to custom design specific properties within the component by layering, thereby promoting different microstructures or compositions (e.g., functionally-graded materials). However, the repetitive rapid solidification that occurs during AM also creates microstructures that deviate significantly from those observed in wrought materials with the same nominal composition. The result is a segregated microstructure with significant variations in local composition/phases, and, in some cases, life-limiting defects that are typically absent in wrought alloys. Most of the AM research currently focuses on refining the build process and on minimizing the residual stresses generated during the build. Consequently, there is far less emphasis on post-build heat treatments that homogenize the as-built microstructures and promote similar properties to wrought alloys. The main objective of this symposium is to develop a better understanding of the input-material requirements, process capabilities, and the resultant effects on finished product microstructure, texture, and properties. Research that elucidates the process-structure-property-performance relationships resulting from rapid solidification and transient phase transformations is essential. Information regarding the influence of inherent defects on the performance of AM-produced components is also greatly needed. Abstracts are requested that relate transient phenomena, recrystallization, transformation, and rapid solidification to additive manufacturing and its influence on phases, microstructure, and properties. Technical sessions emphasizing the following specific topics are planned: • Microstructure evolution in aluminum alloys, stainless steels and aerospace alloys (e.g., Ti, Ni alloys) • Texture measurements and control in AM parts • Defects and their effect on post-build (service) properties • Residual stress evolution and control • Novel applications, complex geometries fabricated via AM • Modeling of AM processes (including liquid and solid-state phase transformation behavior) • Emerging AM processes

2018 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Advanced Characterization Techniques for Quantifying and Modeling Deformation: Organized by Rodney McCabe; Thomas Bieler; Marko Knezevic; Irene Beyerlein; Wolfgang Pantleon; Cem Tasan

This symposium will provide a venue for presentations regarding the use of advanced characterization techniques in all classes of materials to quantify and model deformation mechanisms. Background and Rationale: Advances in characterization technology have greatly improved our ability to quantify deformation mechanisms such as dislocations, twinning, and stress induced phase transformations, and the microstructural changes accompanying deformation such as texture evolution, grain morphology changes, and localized strain. A variety of relatively new techniques are being applied to both structural and functional materials. These techniques, in combination with modeling, are improving our understanding of deformation and failure during material processing/forming and under normal or extreme conditions in service. In situ techniques are also providing enhanced understanding of individual mechanism interactions and direct validation of plasticity models. This gathering provides a place to talk about new advances in current techniques or in technique development as they apply to deformation. Areas of interest include, but are not limited to: (1) Dislocations, deformation twins, and stress induced phase transformations (2) All advanced X-Ray-based techniques (3) All advanced electron-based techniques including HR-(S)TEM, EBSD, HR-EBSD, PED, and in situ TEM (4) All structural and functional materials systems (5) Advances in material modeling through the use of advanced characterization techniques (6) Industrial applications (7) Technique development

2018 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Ultrafine-grained Materials X: Organized by Suveen Mathaudhu; Irene Beyerlein; Avinash Dongare; Chong Soo Lee; Terry Lowe; Srikanth Patala; Lee Semiatin; Jason Trelewicz; Janelle Wharry; Caizhi Zhou

This is the tenth international symposium that focuses on all aspects of the science and technology of ultrafine grained (UFG) and nanocrystalline materials. This symposium covers a broad scope, ranging from fundamental science to applications of bulk ultrafine-grained (grain size <1000 nm) and nanostructured (feature size <100 nm) materials. It provides a forum on the topics of fabrication and understanding of UFG and nanocrystalline materials including conventional and emerging technologies and advancements, fundamental issues in severe plastic deformation (SPD) processing and SPD-processed materials, UFG and nanocrystalline microstructure evolution, mechanical and physical properties, deformation mechanisms, superplasticity, joining and bonding, computational and analytical modeling, structural and functional applications, etc. Other emerging topics to be covered include gradient and layered nanostructures, vapor-phase processing, powder processing, rapid-solidification methods, bio-inspired nanomaterials, and radiation tolerant nanomaterials. Also, in honor of the 10th iteration of this symposium, we will hold a “Pioneers of Ultrafine Grained Materials” session that will highlight the contributions of the superheroes of this field. Awards: UFG X will be hosting a Young Scientist Session for students or post-docs within three years of receiving their Ph.D. There will be up to two Gold Medals and three Silver Medals for best oral presentation. Awards will also be given for best poster (One Gold Medal and two Silver Medals). A committee that includes the symposium organizers and invited speakers will decide the awards. Each medalist will receive a certificate, and may receive a cash prize, depending on resources available.

2017 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Additive Manufacturing of Metals: Establishing Location-Specific Processing-Microstructure-Property Relationships: Organized by Eric Lass; Judy Schneider; Mark Stoudt; Lee Semiatin; Kinga Unocic; Joseph Licavoli; Behrang Poorganji

Advancements in additive manufacturing technology have created the ability to design and construct parts with geometries and properties that cannot be achieved through traditional solidification and deformation processes. This ability has promoted new design strategies whose success relies on close integration of engineering and materials science. Tailoring specific material properties in low-volume production is of particular interest. In principle, engineers can now ‘print’ complex 3-dimensional shapes with internal features that can be optimized to meet a wide range of operational constraints and service conditions. An additional attractive aspect of additive processing is the ability to custom design specific properties within the component by layering, thereby promoting different microstructures or compositions (e.g., functionally-graded materials). The repetitive rapid melting and solidification that occurs during the fabrication process is dominated by transient phenomena, which can create unexpected variations in the composition and performance of the component. Thus, establishing an understanding of this process and its effect on properties requires integrating a variety of computational and experimental methods across a various length and time scales. This includes detailed 3-dimensional characterization as well as numerical modeling of thermodynamics kinetic phenomena. The transient nature of the rapid solidification can result in non-equilibrium phases, which result in properties which differ from materials fabricated by conventional processes. The main objective of this symposium is to develop a better understanding of the input-material requirements, process capabilities, and their effects on finished product properties. Research that elucidates the process-structure-property relationships resulting from rapid solidification and transient phase transformations is greatly needed. Abstracts are requested that relate transient phenomena, recrystallization, transformation, and rapid solidification to additive manufacturing and its influence on phases, microstructure, and mechanical properties.

2017 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Friction Stir Welding and Processing IX: Organized by Yuri Hovanski; Rajiv Mishra; Yutaka Sato; Piyush Upadhyay; David Yan

This symposium is the ninth friction stir welding and processing symposium during TMS Annual Meetings. This symposium will present fundamentals and the current status of friction stir welding (FSW) and solid-state friction stir processing of materials. It will provide researchers and engineers with an opportunity to review the current status of the friction stir related processes and discuss the future possibilities. Papers are sought on all aspects of friction stir welding and processing including their various derivative technologies. Abstracts are requested in the following general topic areas related to friction stir technologies: derivative technologies; high temperature applications, industrial applications, dissimilar alloys and/or materials, lightweight alloys, simulation, and characterization.

2016 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Material Behavior Characterization via Multi-Directional Deformation of Sheet Metal: Organized by John Carsley; Daniel Coughlin; Myoung-Gyu Lee; Youngung Jeong; Piyush Upadhyay

Engineering sheet metals are customarily characterized by simple mechanical tests in order to meet mechanical properties given in OEM specifications. A set of uniaxial tension tests suffice to provide various standardized properties such as yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, strain hardening coefficient, Lankford coefficients, strain rate sensitivity and forming limits. However, when OEMs stamp a blank sheet to shape their final products, the materials experience quite complicated histories of straining paths that may significantly differ from behavior that is characterized by conventional mechanical tests. For example, sheet metals usually experience much higher strain rates, which may lead to phase transitions in the case of multiphase advanced high strength steels. Additionally, the amount of strain during a stamping process can far exceed what is typically obtained by the standard uniaxial tension test. Critical areas of a stamping often experience changes in the strain path. The advanced constitutive models of today require material parameters obtained under multiaxial and complex loading conditions. Over the past decades, the sheet metal forming community has observed that such advanced constitutive models improve the predictive accuracy on formability and springback. However, in order to successfully train the models, unconventional experimental methods are often required. Here a list of notable experimental methods is given: 1) the cruciform test was designed to strain sheet metals in various stress ratios; 2) The tension-compression test was designed to provide a deformation history representing the bending and unbending of sheets during stamping; 3) The hydraulic bulge test is a widely spread method to obtain hardening curves to large levels of plastic strain, which standard uniaxial tests cannot provide; 4) Combination of non-coaxial loadings can provide various stress states, to which the phase transition is sensitive; 5) An experimental setup consisting of multiple steps with various pre-strainings is also practiced in order to observe constitutive behaviors under complex histories of deformation that may occur in typical industrial stamping processes; 6) High speed tests can subject the materials to a rate of speed similar to what is actually observed during the stamping process. The objective of this symposium is to explore numerous advances in experimental testing and computational methods used for material characterization, constitutive modeling, and analyses pertaining to sheet metal deformation in multiple directions along multiple axes or with changing strain path conditions. Potential participants are encouraged to submit abstracts on research of material behavior related to microstructure based on multiple directional deformation including but not limited to: improvements and new methods of mechanical property measurement; characterization of phase transformations and deformation mechanisms in multiphase microstructures during forming; theory and modeling related to the mechanical properties; deformation simulations, forming processes, friction and springback; multi-directional mechanical testing and advanced strain/stress measurements; integration of scientific knowledge with manufacturing practices; and development of accurate constitutive relationships.

2016 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Ultrafine Grained Materials IX: Organized by Suveen Mathaudhu; Irene Beyerlein; Roberto Figueiredo; Zenji Horita; Megumi Kawasaki; Qizhen Li; Hans Roven; Timothy Rupert

This is the ninth international symposium that focuses on all aspects of science and technology of ultrafine grained (UFG) and nanocrystalline materials. This symposium covers a broad scope, ranging from fundamental science to applications of bulk ultrafine-grained (grain size <1000 nm) and nanostructured (feature size <100 nm) materials. It provides a forum on the topics of fabrication and understanding of UFG and nanocrystalline materials including conventional and emerging technologies and advancements, fundamental issues in severe plastic deformation (SPD) processing and SPD-processed materials, UFG and nanocrystalline microstructure evolution, mechanical and physical properties, deformation mechanisms, superplasticity, joining and bonding, computational and analytical modeling, structural and functional applications, etc. Other emerging topics to be covered include gradient and layered nanostructures, stability of nanostructured materials, powder processing and bio-inspired nanomaterials. Awards: UFG IX will be hosting a Young Scientist Session for students or post-docs within three years of receiving their Ph.D. There will be up to two Gold Medals and three Silver Medals for best oral presentation. Awards will also be given for best poster (One Gold Medal and two Silver Medals). A committee that includes the symposium organizers and invited speakers will decide the awards. Each medalist will receive a certificate, and may receive a cash prize, depending on resources available.

2015 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Advanced Characterization Techniques for Quantifying and Modeling Deformation Mechanisms: Organized by Rodney McCabe; John Carpenter; Thomas Bieler; Marko Knezevic; Khalid Hattar; Irene Beyerlein; Wolfgang Pantleon

This symposium will provide a venue for presentations regarding the use of advanced characterization techniques in all classes of materials to quantify and model deformation mechanisms. Background and Rationale: Advances in electron and x-ray based characterization technology have greatly improved our ability to quantify the microstructural changes that accompany deformation including interactions of dislocations and the evolution of dislocation structures, twin nucleation and growth, texture evolution, and grain morphology changes. A variety of techniques such as aberration corrected TEM, HR-EBSD, PED, and Bragg CDI are relatively new techniques that are being applied to both structural and functional materials. These techniques, in combination with modeling, are improving our understanding of deformation mechanisms accommodating plastic strain and failure during material processing/forming and under normal or extreme conditions in service. In situ TEM has also provided an enhanced understanding of the motion and relative stability of deformation mechanisms through the observation of local events. Talks of this nature are often scattered across symposia at TMS and this provides a place to talk about new advances in current techniques or in technique development. Areas of interest include, but are not limited to: (1) Dislocations and deformation twins (2) All advanced X-Ray-based techniques including Bragg CDI (3) All advanced electron-based techniques including HR-TEM, EBSD, HR-EBSD, PED, and in situ TEM (4) All structural and functional materials systems (5) Advances in material modeling through the use of advanced characterization techniques (6) Industrial applications (7) Technique development

2015 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Development of "Weak Links" during the Processing of Metallic Materials: Organized by Lee Semiatin; Anthony Rollett; Thomas Bieler; Mark Stoudt

This symposium is being held in recognition of the numerous fundamental and technological contributions that Professor Henry R Piehler (and his students) have made in the field of deformation processing and its effect on in-service properties. Specifically, the mechanical behavior and service life of metallic components is usually controlled not by so-called "typical" microstructural features, but rather by abnormal features, which represent weak links in the material. Abnormal features may include internal cavities, un-recrystallized areas, bands of non-uniform texture/micro-texture, abnormally large grains, etc. From a statistical point of view, such problems are related to the tails of distributions and extreme values. The objective of this symposium, therefore, is to highlight current knowledge about the source of such defects from both a fundamental research perspective as well as industrial experience in the aerospace, automotive, appliance, and other industries. Topics of specific interest include, but are not limited to, the following: a) evolution of defects associated with non-uniform/incomplete recovery, recrystallization, and/or grain growth, b) evolution of defects associated with non-uniform crystallographic texture, c) evolution of defects associated with non-uniform mechanical texture, d) evolution of defects associated with irregular macroscopic or microscopic metal flow during processing (e.g., shear bands, cavitation, micro-cracks, damage, etc.) e) modeling of defect evolution during processing, f) quantification of the distributions of microstructural elements relevant to performance and failure, g) case histories of defect evolution at the laboratory and industrial scales, and h) application of fundamental knowledge to reduce/eliminate defects in industrial processes.

2015 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Friction Stir Welding and Processing VIII: Organized by Rajiv Mishra; Murray Mahoney; Yutaka Sato; Yuri Hovanski

This symposium is the eighth friction stir welding and processing symposium during TMS Annual Meetings. This symposium will present fundamentals and the current status of friction stir welding (FSW) and solid-state friction stir processing of materials. It will provide researchers and engineers with an opportunity to review the current status of the friction stir related processes and discuss the future possibilities. Papers are sought on all aspects of friction stir welding and processing.