Nuclear Materials Committee

Technical Programming

2018 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Accelerated Materials Evaluation for Nuclear Application Utilizing Test Reactors, Ion Beam Facilities and Integrated Modeling: Organized by James Cole; Peter Hosemann; Julie Tucker; Elaine West

The response of fuels and materials to radiation is critical to the performance of advanced nuclear systems. Key to understanding material performance in a nuclear environment is the analysis of materials irradiated using test reactors and ion beam facilities. This symposium will focus on recent results produced from irradiation programs around the world and will cover fundamental and applied science aspects of accelerated nuclear materials testing for fission and fusion reactors. Presentations combining experiment with theory, modeling and simulation to enhance our understanding of radiation induced degradation in materials are especially encouraged. Abstracts are solicited for (but not limited to) the following irradiation program topics: - Fundamental science of radiation damage and defect processes - Mechanical and fracture behavior of irradiated materials - Current and advanced nuclear fuels - Current and advanced structural materials - Fluence effects in materials

2018 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Accident Tolerant Fuels for Light Water Reactor: Organized by Lingfeng He; Andrew Nelson; Kumar Sridharan; Peng Xu

This symposium is focused on nuclear fuels with enhanced accident tolerance for Light Water Reactor (LWR) with an emphasis on assessment of their performance. Topics related to design, fabrication, characterization, irradiation, post-irradiation examination, testing simulating accident conditions, and modeling/simulation of accident tolerant fuels are within the scope of this symposium. This symposium will provide a platform for exhibiting and discussing recent experimental and computational progress in this area. Abstracts are solicited in (but not limited to) the following topics: • Accident tolerant fuel and cladding materials development • Microstructure, mechanical, thermodynamic and physical property characterization • Radiation damage and post-irradiation examination on accident tolerant fuel and cladding materials • Fuel rod, fuel cladding and component materials behaviors under accident conditions (corrosion, steam corrosion, chemical interaction, etc.) • Multi-scale modeling/simulation of materials behavior under normal and accident conditions

2018 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Atom Probe Tomography for Advanced Characterization of Metals, Minerals and Materials: Organized by Haiming Wen; Simon Ringer; Gregory Thompson; Arun Devaraj; Keith Knipling; Gang Sha; David Seidman; Chantal Sudbrack

Atom probe tomography (APT), is an emergent characterization technique that is capable of determining the chemical identity of each individual atom and generating 3D chemical maps imaging the distribution of individual atoms. The technique offers high spatial resolution (better than 0.3 nm achievable in all directions) and high analytical sensitivity (as good as 1 appm). APT provides information on elemental composition of the specimen, 3D visualization of distribution of atoms, composition of phases, morphology and size of precipitates, and solute distribution across interfaces, at grain boundaries and along dislocations. In many APT analyses, crystallographic information has been retained within the data, with the potential to directly relate the composition of specific microstructural features to their crystallography with unprecedented sensitivity and resolution. APT can be utilized in many different fields for advanced imaging and analysis of metals, minerals and materials, despite some limitations. This symposium is designed to bring together scientists, engineers and technicians from across disciplines to discuss the technique of APT, its applications and limitations. The symposium will encompass research and applications spanning a wide variety of topics. Presentations on experimental, theoretical, and modeling research are solicited. Topics for this symposium include, but are not limited to:  Applications of APT in advanced characterization of metals, minerals and materials  3D reconstruction and data analysis  Impact of specimen and instrument parameters and optimization of acquisition conditions  Specimen preparation techniques  Limitations of APT  Progress in APT technique  Correlative techniques

2018 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Computational Materials Science and Engineering for Nuclear Energy: Organized by Haixuan Xu; Michael Tonks; Blas Uberuaga; James Morris

This symposium will highlight current computational materials science and engineering efforts for nuclear reactors in the United States and abroad. High neutron flux, thermal and chemical gradients, and corrosive environments cause significant degradation in the chemical and mechanical properties of materials. Enhanced radiation resistance of structural materials and nuclear fuels are needed to overcome technological challenges necessary for future nuclear systems. This symposium seeks abstracts that apply�atomistic and mesoscale simulations to discover, understand, and engineer the macroscale performance of fission/fusion reactor materials, including fuel, cladding, and structural materials. This symposium will also consider multiscale modeling efforts that bridge length and time scales in order to better connect simulation results with experimental data for predictive model validation. It will also highlight validation of all relevant models, as well as uncertainty quantification. Finally, the application of ICME approaches to use modeling and simulation to better understand structure-property relationships, their associated links with performance, and their application to designing future reactor concepts and materials is also desired. Some examples include: • Modeling and simulation of materials behavior under extreme environments – radiation, corrosion, stress and temperature, including radiation effects, phase stability, fuel-clad interactions, fission product behavior. • Modeling and simulation of model materials to uncover fundamental behavior�that affects material performance in radiative environments. • Developing improved material models for LWR fuel and cladding. • Modeling and simulation of new fuel materials including metal, silicide, and nitride fuels. • Modeling and simulation of new cladding materials, such as silicon carbide, coated zirconium alloys, or FeCrAl. • Development and integration of computational tools, methods, and databases for reactor structural material design. Uncertainty quantification and validation of all the applications listed above.

2018 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors VII: Organized by Ramprashad Prabhakaran; Dennis Keiser; Raul Rebak; Clarissa Yablinsky; Anne Campbell

Globally, significant efforts are ongoing to meet the growing energy demand with the increased use of nuclear energy. Extensive work is being performed to develop materials and fuels for the advanced nuclear reactors. In addition, efforts are also ongoing to extend the life of existing nuclear power plants. Scientists, engineers, and students at various national laboratories, universities, and industries are working on a number of materials challenges for the nuclear energy systems. The objective of this symposium is to provide a platform for these researchers to congregate, exhibit and discuss their current research work, in addition to sharing the challenges and solutions with the professional community and thus, shape the future of nuclear energy. Abstracts are solicited in (but not limited to) the following topics: - Nuclear reactor systems - Advanced nuclear fuels - fabrication, performance, and design - Advanced nuclear fuels - properties and modeling - Advanced structural materials - fabrication, joining, properties, and characterization - Lifetime extension of reactors - nuclear materials aging, degradation, and others - Experimental, modeling, and simulation studies - Fundamental science of radiation-material interactions - Irradiation effects in nuclear materials - Materials degradation issues - stress corrosion cracking, corrosion, creep, fatigue, and others - Design of materials for extreme radiation environments - Radiation measurement techniques and modeling studies - Nuclear waste - disposal, transmutation, spent nuclear fuel reprocessing

2017 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Ceramic Materials for Nuclear Energy Research and Applications: Organized by Xian-Ming Bai; Yongfeng Zhang; Maria Okuniewski; Donna Guillen; Marat Khafizov; Thierry Wiss

Nuclear energy is an essential element of a clean energy strategy, avoiding greenhouse gas emissions of over two billion tons per year. Ceramic materials play a critical role in nuclear energy research and applications. Nuclear fuels, such as uranium dioxide (UO2) and mixed oxide (MOX) fuels, have been widely used in current light water reactors (LWRs) to produce about 15% of the electricity in the world. Silicon carbide (SiC) is a promising accident-tolerant cladding material and is under active research studies. Some oxide ceramics have been proposed for novel inert matrix fuels or have been extensively studied as waste forms for the immobilization of nuclear waste. Moreover, ceramics are under active studies for fusion reactor research. This symposium focuses on experimental and computational studies of ceramics for nuclear energy research and applications. Both practical reactor materials and surrogate materials are of interest. The topics of interest include but are not limited to: defect production and evolution; mobility, dissolution, and precipitation of solid, volatile, and gaseous fission products; changes in various properties (e.g., thermal conductivity, volume swelling, mechanical properties) induced by microstructural evolution; and radiation-induced phase changes. Experimental studies using various advanced characterization techniques for characterizing radiation effects in ceramics are of particular interest. The irradiation techniques such as laboratory ion beam accelerators, research and test reactors, as well as commercial nuclear power reactors are all of interest. Computational studies across different scales from atomistic to the continuum are all welcome. Contributions focused on novel fuels such as doped UO2, high density uranium fuels like uranium nitrides and silicides, and coatings for accident-tolerant fuel claddings are also encouraged. This symposium is intended to bring together national laboratory, university, and nuclear industry researchers from around the world to discuss the current understanding of the radiation response of ceramics through experiment, theory and multi-scale modeling. Topic 1: Experimental characterization of non-irradiated and irradiated oxide ceramics Topic 2: Multi-scale modeling on microstructure evolution and physical properties in ceramics Topic 3: Thermal-mechanical properties of oxides for nuclear energy Topic 4: Non-oxide ceramics for nuclear energy Topic 5: Nanostructured ceramics for nuclear energy (joint topic with "Nanostructured materials for nuclear applications II")

2017 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Hume-Rothery Award Symposium: Alloy Phase Chemistry at the Atomic Level - Opportunities and Challenges: Organized by Wei Xiong; Shuanglin Chen; Frederic Danoix; Indrajit Charit

A new generation of experimental and modeling techniques now permits exploration of local phase chemistry at the atomic level. The implications of this work are wide-ranging, both for improving the understanding of existing materials, and for the development of new and improved materials for structural and functional use. Applications include improvements in the understanding of strengthening mechanisms in engineering materials; characterization of the role of alloy elements and trace additions on phase transformation behavior; assessment of safe operating lifetimes of materials under thermal ageing and irradiation conditions; and the design and development of new materials for maximum performance in terms of mechanical, electrical, optical or magnetic properties. Success in these areas is critically dependent on the accuracy and reliability of the experimental techniques being used, and on the quantitative validation of the theoretical models employed. Considerable issues arise at this point. Experimental methods are being pushed to their limits, and benchmarking standards are difficult or impossible to obtain. Theoretical models require simplifying assumptions, which may distort outcomes or reduce the level of confidence in the numerical results obtained. The focus of this symposium is to assess the state of art in atomic-scale characterization and modeling of alloy phase chemistry, and to identify the key steps needed in order to make further progress. What works? What does not work? How can we do better? In the absence of reliable quantitative standards for individual techniques, cross-correlation is required between different experimental methods, between different modeling approaches, and especially between experimental and modeling studies of the same system(s). Papers are invited which contribute to the above themes. Critical appraisals of the strengths and weaknesses of individual techniques (atom probe tomography, X-ray microanalysis, electron energy loss spectroscopy etc.) for specific applications are sought. Case studies involving the use of a range of experimental techniques to study a single materials problem are particularly welcome. Special prominence will be given to studies which involve both advanced experimental work and state-of-the-art modeling approaches.

2017 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors VI: Organized by Ramprashad Prabhakaran; Dennis Keiser; Raul Rebak; Clarissa Yablinsky

Globally, significant efforts are ongoing to meet the growing energy demand with the increased use of nuclear energy. Extensive work is being performed to develop materials and fuels for the advanced nuclear reactors. In addition, efforts are also ongoing to extend the life of existing nuclear power plants. Scientists, engineers, and students at various national laboratories, universities, and industries are working on a number of materials challenges for the nuclear energy systems. The objective of this symposium is to provide a platform for these researchers to congregate, exhibit and discuss their current research work, in addition to sharing the challenges and solutions with the professional community and thus, shape the future of nuclear energy. Abstracts are solicited in (but not limited to) the following topics: • Nuclear reactor systems • Advanced nuclear fuels - fabrication, performance, and design • Advanced nuclear fuels - properties and modeling • Advanced structural materials - fabrication, joining, properties, and characterization • Lifetime extension of reactors - nuclear materials aging, degradation, and others • Experimental, modeling, and simulation studies • Fundamental science of radiation-material interactions • Irradiation effects in nuclear materials • Materials degradation issues - stress corrosion cracking, corrosion, creep, fatigue, and others • Design of materials for extreme radiation environments • Radiation measurement techniques and modeling studies • Nuclear waste - disposal, transmutation, spent nuclear fuel reprocessing

2017 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Mechanical and Creep Behavior of Advanced Materials: A SMD Symposium Honoring Prof. K. Linga Murty: Organized by Indrajit Charit; Yuntian Zhu; Stuart Maloy; Peter Liaw

This symposium will celebrate the 75th birthday and life-long contributions of Professor K.L. Murty, and provide a forum to discuss the present status and recent advances in research areas in which he has made seminal contributions. These areas include: • High temperature creep deformation of materials and micromechanistic interpretation; • Prediction of mechanical behavior of HCP metals/alloys using crystallographic texture; • Creep and fatigue behavior of microelectronic solders; • Radiation tolerance of nanostructured materials; • Development and application of ball indentation techniques as a non-destructive monitoring method of structural materials; • Characterization of dynamical behavior of point and line defects using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques.

2017 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Microstructural Processes in Irradiated Materials: Organized by Thak Sang Byun; Chu-Chun Fu; Djamel Kaoumi; Dane Morgan; Mahmood Mamivand; Yasuyoshi Nagai

Radiation can produce significant degradation in the properties of materials. An understanding of the microstructural changes occurring during irradiation is critical for the development of advanced materials as well as for modeling property changes. The scope of this symposium will focus on the microstructural changes occurring in solids during ion, electron, neutron, gamma ray or x-ray irradiation. This symposium, which is the 7th in a series of symposia held every two years since 2003, is intended to bring together researchers working on different materials systems and radiation induced phenomena so that similarities and differences in radiation effects can be compared and integrated. Materials of interest include all nuclear structural, fuel, and functional materials. Both experimental and theoretical studies are solicited with a particular emphasis on linking state-of-the-art modeling with experimental observation of materials microstructure and property evolution. Specific topics where contributions are encouraged include: - Radiation damage in fusion & fission reactor materials - Radiation induced segregation, precipitation, amorphization and recrystallization - Radiation induced helium bubble formation, swelling and creep - Mechanisms of deformation and fracture in irradiated materials - Radiation effects simulation and evaluation techniques - Integrated phenomena in reactor materials - Microstructural changes in metallic and ceramic fuels - Advanced ODS, austenitic and ferritic-martensitic steels - Refractory metals, carbon and ceramic materials

2017 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Nanostructured Materials for Nuclear Applications II: Organized by Cheng Sun; Khalid Hattar; Celine Hin ; Fei Gao ; Osman Anderoglu ; Mitra Taheri ; Haiming Wen

A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is to discover advanced materials that can operate reliably in extreme service conditions, i.e. neutron, high temperatures, corrosive environments, etc. nanostructured materials with a high volume fraction of buried interfaces are theorized to have improved resistance to irradiation. Thus, there is an increasing need to understand how interfacial structures mitigate radiation-induced damage and to design stable nanostructured materials that can survive in these severe irradiation conditions. The aim of this symposium is to provide a forum for the discussion on nanostructured materials stability under extreme conditions. This includes understanding the role of grain boundary and interfacial structures and chemistry on the radiation tolerance and microstructural stability. Presentations on experimental, theoretical, and modeling research are solicited. Topic areas for this symposium include, but are not limited to: 1. Manufacturing, characterization, and mechanical testing of nano-engineered materials. 2. Radiation damage of nano-featured materials, including nanoparticle-dispersion-strengthened composites, nanocrystalline materials, multilayer structured materials etc. 3. The effects of interfaces (free surfaces, grain boundaries, phase boundaries, etc) on the radiation tolerance of materials 4. Nano-mechanical testing of irradiated materials. 5. Nanostructured waste form materials and fuels. (Joint session with symposium: “Ceramic Materials for Nuclear Energy Research and Applications”) 6. Atom probe tomography characterization of irradiated materials. (Joint session with symposium: “Alloy Phase Chemistry at the Atomic Level: Opportunities and Challenges”)

2016 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Accelerated Materials Evaluation for Nuclear Application Utilizing Test Reactors, Ion Beam Facilities and Integrated Modeling: Organized by James Cole; Peter Hosemann; Todd Allen; Elaine West

The response of fuels and materials to radiation is critical to the performance of advanced nuclear systems. Key to understanding material performance in a nuclear environment is the analysis of materials irradiated using test reactors and ion beam facilities. This symposium will focus on recent results produced from irradiation programs around the world and will cover fundamental and applied science aspects of accelerated nuclear materials testing for fission and fusion reactors. Presentations combining experiment with theory, modeling and simulation to enhance our understanding of radiation induced degradation in materials are especially encouraged. Abstracts are solicited in (but not limited to) the following topics: - Fundamental science of radiation damage and defect processes - Mechanical and fracture behavior of irradiated materials - Current and advanced nuclear fuels - Current and advanced structural materials - Fluence effects in materials

2016 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors V: Organized by Ramprashad Prabhakaran; Dennis Keiser; Raul Rebak; Clarissa Yablinsky

Globally, significant efforts are ongoing to meet the growing energy demand with the increased use of nuclear energy. Extensive work is being performed to develop materials and fuels for the advanced nuclear reactors. In addition, efforts are also ongoing to extend the life of existing nuclear power plants. Scientists, engineers, and students at various national laboratories, universities, and industries are working on a number of materials challenges for the nuclear energy systems. The objective of this symposium is to provide a platform for these researchers to congregate, exhibit and discuss their current research work, in addition to sharing the challenges and solutions with the professional community and thus, shape the future of nuclear energy. Abstracts are solicited in (but not limited to) the following topics: • Nuclear reactor systems • Advanced nuclear fuels - fabrication, performance, and design • Advanced nuclear fuels - properties and modeling • Advanced structural materials - fabrication, joining, properties, and characterization • Lifetime extension of reactors - nuclear materials aging, degradation, and others • Experimental, modeling, and simulation studies • Fundamental science of radiation-material interactions • Irradiation effects in nuclear materials • Materials degradation issues - stress corrosion cracking, corrosion, creep, fatigue, and others • Design of materials for extreme radiation environments • Radiation measurement techniques and modeling studies • Nuclear waste - disposal, transmutation, spent nuclear fuel reprocessing

2016 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Nanostructured Materials for Nuclear Applications: Organized by Cheng Sun; Michael Demkowicz; Amit Misra; Osman Anderoglu; Khalid Hattar

A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is to discover advanced materials that can operate reliably in extreme service conditions, i.e. under high-dose neutron irradiation at high temperatures and in corrosive environments. Nanostructured materials with a high volume fraction of buried interfaces are believed to have improved resistance to irradiation. Thus, there is an increasing need to understand how interfacial structures mitigate radiation-induced damage and to design stable nanostructured materials that can survive in severe irradiation conditions. The aim of this symposium is to provide a forum for the discussion of irradiation response of nanostructured materials and the stability of the corresponding interfacial structures. Presentations on experimental, theoretical, and modeling research are solicited. Topic areas for this symposium include, but are not limited to: 1.Processing, characterization, and testing of nanostructured nuclear materials. 2.Radiation damage of nano-structured metals, ceramics, and composites. 3.Radiation response of nanowire, nanoparticles, and nanoporous solids. 4.Effect of local interface chemistry on radiation response and properties. 5.Nano-mechanical measurements of irradiated materials. 6.The effects of surfaces, grain boundaries, and phase boundaries on radiation response.

2015 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Fuels with Neutron and Synchrotron Radiation: Organized by Jonathan Almer; Meimei Li; Donald Brown; Tiangan Lian

Neutron and synchrotron radiation sources offer new opportunities to advance the fundamental understanding of nuclear reactor materials, fuels and engineering components. A variety of advanced characterization tools including diffraction, imaging and spectroscopy have recently become available to allow measurements of microstructure and strain over a range of relevant time and length scales, on both pre- and post-irradiated materials, and under in situ conditions including stress and temperature. The symposium will highlight recent experimental efforts and future prospects to characterize material and fuel systems for nuclear reactor application using neutron and synchrotron radiation techniques, including possibilities for in-situ irradiation. Areas covered will include stress/strain mapping, void and crack initiation and propagation, phase stability and phase transformations, characterization of irradiation defects and nanoclusters, and corrosion.

2015 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors IV: Organized by Ramprashad Prabhakaran; Dennis Keiser; Raul Rebak; Clarissa Yablinsky

Globally, significant efforts are ongoing to meet the growing energy demand with the increased use of nuclear energy. Extensive work is being performed to develop materials and fuels for the advanced nuclear reactors. In addition, efforts are also ongoing to extend the life of existing nuclear power plants. Scientists, engineers and students at various national laboratories, universities and industries are working on a number of materials challenges for the nuclear energy systems. The objective of this symposium is to provide a platform for these researchers to congregate, exhibit and discuss their current research work, in addition to sharing the challenges and solutions with the professional community and thus, shape the future of nuclear energy. Abstracts are solicited in (but not limited to) the following topics: - Nuclear reactor systems - Advanced nuclear fuels - fabrication, performance and design - Advanced nuclear fuels - properties and modeling - Advanced structural materials - fabrication, joining, properties and characterization - Lifetime extension of reactors - nuclear materials aging, degradation and others - Experimental, modeling and simulation studies - Fundamental science of radiation-material interactions - Irradiation effects in nuclear materials - Materials degradation issues - stress corrosion cracking, corrosion, creep, fatigue and others - Design of materials for extreme radiation environments - Radiation measurement techniques and modeling studies - Nuclear waste - disposal, transmutation, spent nuclear fuel reprocessing and others

2015 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Microstructural Processes in Irradiated Materials: Organized by Dane Morgan; Thak Sang Byun; Yasuyoshi Nagai; Zhijie Jiao; Kai Nordlund; Ming-Jie Zheng

Radiation can produce significant degradation in the properties of materials. An understanding of the microstructural changes occurring during irradiation is critical for the development of advanced materials as well as for modeling property changes. The scope of this symposium will focus on the microstructural changes occurring in solids during ion, electron, neutron, gamma ray or x-ray irradiation. This symposium, which is the 7th in a series of symposia held every two years since 2003, is intended to bring together researchers working on different materials systems and radiation induced phenomena so that similarities and differences in radiation effects can be compared and integrated. Materials of interest include all nuclear structural, fuel, and functional materials. Both experimental and theoretical studies are solicited with a particular emphasis on linking state-of-the-art modeling with experimental observation of materials microstructure and property evolution. Specific topics where contributions are encouraged include: - Defect generation, evolution and characterization - Radiation induced precipitation, amorphization, and recrystallization - In-situ studies of dislocation–radiation defect interactions - Phase stability, segregation, and diffusion - Radiation damage in fusion & fission reactor materials - Mechanisms of deformation and fracture in irradiated materials - Radiation effects simulation and evaluation techniques - Integrated phenomena in reactor core materials - Microstructural changes in metallic and ceramic fuels - Advanced ODS steels, austenitic and ferritic-martensitic steels - Refractory metals, carbon and ceramic materials

2015 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Nano- and Micro-Mechanical Measurements in Harsh Environments: Organized by Peter Hosemann; Jeffrey Wheeler; Verena Maier; Douglas Stauffer

Most materials are exposed to an environment different than that found in laboratory conditions, and it has been recognized that a material’s properties change based on the environment to which it is exposed. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms by which a material’s properties change in harsh environments (e.g. high and low temperatures, radiation, high strain rate deformation, and corrosive agents) is key to understanding materials behavior in service conditions. Nano- and Micro-scale material testing has been utilized to understand the basic phenomena of materials degradation and behavior. An obvious next step is to expand these valuable measurements to the environments that materials are exposed to during service conditions in order to study the synergistic effects between harsh environments and materials property degradation on the nano scale. The harsh environments materials experience can have a direct impact on the performance of nano-devices and nano-enabled energy systems for power, defense, and civil applications. For these reasons, we assert that we need to incorporate the environmental nano- and micro-mechanical measurement of materials, and we propose this symposium to accomplish this end. We are welcoming abstracts on materials evaluated using nano- and micro-mechanical measurements at low or high temperatures, chemical environments (gas, aqueous), radiation or any other harsh environment.

2015 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Structural Materials, Heat Transport Fluids, and Novel System Designs for High Power and Process Heat Generation: Organized by Peter Hosemann; Peiwen Li; Kumar Sridharan; Bruce Pint

High temperature sources are desirable for a wide range of engineering and industrial applications. Many renewable energy systems have the potential to develop a heat source for desirable high temperatures. Especially with the development of new Nuclear Power (NP), Clean Coal (CC) concepts as well as Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) concepts with high temperatures for process heat, hydrogen generation or efficient energy storage become viable options. The push to higher temperatures (>750oC) increases the need for different heat transport fluids and raises the question of the limits of structural materials available and deployed today. Harsh environments (temperature, corrosion, stress from flow of heat transport fluids, time, cost, pressure and cyclic loading) make this application challenging for the materials deployed and the limit of what conventional materials may be exceeded. In this symposium, we are providing a platform for a thorough discussion of all materials aspects associated with high temperature heat transport systems especially deployed in CSP,NP and CC systems with a particular focus on the structural materials. We are inviting application oriented papers as well as fundamental scientific contributions associated with interaction of structural materials with novel heat transport fluids (liquid salt, liquid metal, hydrocarbon, supercritical steam, supercritical CO2, etc.) including new heat transfer design concepts . Mechanical strength, high temperature durability as well as corrosion resistance of structural materials in any of the environments listed are of interest. 1) Expected session topics include: Materials for very high temperature heat transport systems with novel heat transport media, including but not limited to liquid metal, salt, sand, supercritical CO2. 2) Materials in high temperature, high pressure water systems 3) High temperature properties of the structural materials, including thermal cycling 4) Fundamental aspects of chemistry control to prevent corrosion in these systems. 5) Materials needs for new heat transfer designs It is the intention to focus on the specific issues associated with this application with solid material science background and to explore potentially unusual solutions and approaches. This symposium intends to bring together applied materials engineers as well as basic material scientists.