Mechanical Behavior of Materials Committee

Technical Programming

2022 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Additive Manufacturing Fatigue and Fracture: Developing Predictive Capabilities: Organized by Nik Hrabe; John Lewandowski; Nima Shamsaei; Mohsen Seifi; Steve Daniewicz

It is the purpose of this symposium to move toward that expanded understanding by providing a forum to present research results from investigations into fatigue and fracture behavior of additive manufacturing of metals. The symposium will be organized into seven sessions: 1. Microstructure-based Fatigue Studies on Additive-Manufactured Materials (Jointly organized with Fatigue in Materials Symposium) 2. Fatigue Modeling and Prediction 3. Critical Flaw Size Investigations 4. New Fatigue and Fracture Test Methods (e.g. small-scale techniques) 5. Processing-Structure-Property Fatigue and Fracture Investigations (see details below) 6. Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) Techniques in Fatigue and Fracture 7. Corrosion, Environmental, Residual Stress, and Surface Roughness Effects on Fatigue and Fracture Processing-structure-property-performance relationships pertinent to this symposium include the following. Processing includes machine settings (e.g. layer thickness), melt parameters (e.g. energy density), post-processing (e.g. heat treatment, surface treatment), and feedstock variables (e.g. flowability, spreadability, particle size distribution) that can directly impact fatigue and fracture performance of parts. Structure includes crystallographic microstructure (e.g. texture), internal defects (e.g. pores, inclusions), external defects (e.g. surface roughness), residual stress, and chemistry. Properties include all fatigue and fracture properties (e.g. high-cycle fatigue, low-cycle fatigue, linear elastic fracture toughness (KIc), elastic-plastic fracture toughness (J-int), fatigue crack growth rate, and impact toughness (Charpy)). Performance includes any end-product testing.

2022 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Advances in Multi-Principal Elements Alloys X: Alloy Development and Properties: Organized by Peter Liaw; Michael Gao; E-Wen Huang; Jennifer Carter; Srivatsan Tirumalai; Xie Xie; Gongyao Wang

This symposium will offer the opportunities for discussions and presentations on the current research regarding the experimental and theoretical studies on the mechanical behavior, microstructures, and fabrication of multi-principal elements alloys (MPEAs) or high-entropy alloys (HEAs). BACKGROUND AND RATIONALE: MPEAs, which often consist of five or more elements, typically consist of solid-solution phases in the form of face-centered-cubic (FCC), body-center-cubic (BCC), and hexagonal close-packed (HCP) structures. MPEAs possess desirable properties, including excellent ductility, exceptional corrosion and oxidation resistance, irradiation stability, high strength, fatigue and wear resistance. These aspects make MPEAs potential candidates for use in structural, energy, mechanical, and biomedical fields. Furthermore, recent research has suggested that there is potential for the development of novel MPEAs with functional properties that far exceed those of conventional materials. Topics of interest include but not limited to: (1) Mechanical behavior, such as plastic deformation, creep, fatigue, and fracture (2) Metastable MPEAs (3) Microstructural control of material behavior (i.e., physical, mechanical, corrosion, magnetic electric, irradiation, thermal, and biomedical behavior, etc.) (4) Material fabrication and processing, such as homogenization, nanomaterials, additive manufacturing, and grain-boundary engineering (5) Theoretical modeling and simulation using advanced computational techniques, such as CALPHAD modeling, molecular dynamics, density functional theory, Monte Carlo, as well as phase-field and finite-elements methods (6) Advanced characterization methods, including in situ transmission electron microscopy, neutron scattering, electron backscatter diffraction, and three-dimensional (3D) atom probe, (7) Thermodynamics and diffusivity: measurements and modeling, and (8) Industrial applications This Symposium focuses on the alloy design, development, and mechanical and other properties of MPEA.

2022 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Bulk Metallic Glasses XIX: Organized by Robert Maass; Peter Derlet; Katharine Flores; Yonghao Sun; Lindsay Greer; Peter Liaw

Suppressing crystallization of metallic melts leads to the formation of metals that lack long-range order. Major advances in the fundamental understanding of glass formation and alloy design has promoted the development of so-called bulk metallic glasses, with critical casting thicknesses of several centimeters. These novel bulk metals possess a range of advantageous mechanical and functional properties, but a complete understanding of how structure relates to properties is still lacking. This symposium is a platform to discuss the recent progress made in processing, manufacturing, structure, and properties. The Bulk Metallic Glass symposium brings together a broad range of materials researchers for a technical exchange and a discussion of the scientific issues driving research in this field. The topics of interest to this symposium include, but are not limited to, the following: • Glass-forming ability and the glass transition • Atomic structure • Alloy development • Novel processing methods • Novel manufacturing approaches • Mechanical and physical properties • Homogeneous and inhomogeneous deformation • Atomistic simulations • Modelling and theory of fundamentals The symposium will emphasize experimental, computational, and theoretical aspects of the development, processing, and properties of metallic glasses.

2022 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Dynamic Behavior of Materials IX: Organized by Eric Brown; Saryu Fensin; George Gray; Marc Meyers; Neil Bourne; Avinash Dongare; Benjamin Morrow

The dynamic behavior of materials encompasses a broad range of phenomena with technological applications in both the military and civilian sectors. Examples of such phenomena include deformation, fracture, fragmentation, shear localization, chemical reactions under extreme conditions, and processing (combustion synthesis; shock compaction; explosive welding and fabrication; shock and shear synthesis of novel materials). It is recognized today that materials aspects are of utmost importance in dynamic events. The macromechanical and physical processes that govern the phenomena manifest themselves, at the micro structural level, by a dazzling complexity of defect configurations and effects. Nevertheless, these processes/mechanisms can be quantitatively treated on the basis of accumulated knowledge. The advent of in-situ techniques available at facilities like APS-DCS, LCLS, NIF, Omega, Diamond Light Source, European XFEL, pRad, and DMMSC have enabled us to make significant strides towards gaining more insights into the basic mechanisms that drive materials response under dynamic loading. These, coupled with modeling tools from continuum to ab-initio computations, enable realistic predictions of material performances and are starting to guide not only the design process but also our further micromechanical understanding of deformation processes at every level, including the basic dislocation mechanisms. In addition to traditional materials, we have also made progress in understanding the extreme response of emerging materials, such as nano-crystalline, bulk metallic glasses, and high entropy alloys.

2022 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Fatigue in Materials: Fundamentals, Multiscale Characterizations and Computational Modeling: Organized by Jean-Charles Stinville; Garrett Pataky; Ashley Spear; Antonios Kontsos; Brian Wisner; Orion Kafka

This symposium features novel methods and new discoveries for understanding all aspects of material fatigue. It brings together scientists and engineers from all over the world to present their latest work on current issues in: characterizing and simulating fatigue damage; identifying microstructural weak links; enhancing fatigue strength and resistance; reporting on quantitative relationships among processing, microstructure, environment, and fatigue properties; and providing methods to perform life predictions. This symposium further provides a platform for fostering new ideas about fatigue at multiple scales and in multiple environments, numerically, theoretically, and experimentally. The proposed 2022 TMS symposium will be organized into six sessions: -Advanced Experimental Characterization of Microstructurally Driven Fatigue Behavior -Microstructure-based Fatigue Studies on Additive-Manufactured Materials (to be jointly organized with AM Fatigue & Fracture symposium) -Multi-mechanical Interactions during Extreme Environment Fatigue Loading -From Cyclic Plastic Localization to Crack Nucleation and Propagation -Data-Driven Investigations of Fatigue -Multiscale Modeling Approaches to Improve Fatigue Predictions The proposed six sessions will be carried out over three full days, with morning and afternoon sessions each day. Throughout the six sessions, there will be an estimated 50 oral presentations, with 2-4 of those being keynote presentations. Additionally, a poster session will be held to supplement the oral presentations and to encourage student involvement. Students may submit an abstract for a poster presentation, an oral presentation, or both. Prizes for best posters will be awarded. A possible edited volume of extended articles on select topics discussed in this symposium will be evaluated during the meeting.

2022 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Materials Systems for the Future of Fusion Energy: Organized by Jason Trelewicz; Kevin Field; Takaaki Koyanagi; Yuanyuan Zhu; Dalong Zhang

The recent National Academies report on “Bringing Fusion to the U.S. Grid” has established an ambitious goal of producing net electricity in a nuclear fusion pilot plant by 2040. Scientific and technical innovations in materials for plasma facing components, structural and functional materials, high temperature superconducting magnets, and the tritium fuel cycle were recognized as essential components to achieving this critical milestone in carbon-free energy production. Exposure of materials to fusion plasmas and their ensuing property degradation has long been recognized as one of the most important challenges facing the future of fusion energy. Bulk damage in structural and blanket materials from aggressive neutron fluxes combined with surface damage on plasma facing components from the high flux, high fluence plasma conditions will ultimately limit material stability, and in turn, component and sub-system lifetimes. A fundamental understanding of the coupling between near-surface phenomena and bulk microstructure evolution under fusion relevant conditions, and its implications for materials performance and sustainability, are thus key scientific drivers for future innovations in fusion materials. This symposium aims to broadly discuss fusion materials research and the fundamental physics of materials degradation under separate effects testing and coupled extremes involving elevated temperature, stress, irradiation (ion and neutron), plasma exposure, and oxidizing environments. Talks are solicited that cover new structural and functional materials systems, fusion specific applications of materials, fundamentals of radiation damage, novel in situ techniques and other testing approaches, and advances in modeling and theory for fusion materials. Topics of interest include but are not limited to: • Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels, tungsten and refractory alloys, composites and functionally graded materials, and novel radiation-resistant materials including compositionally complex alloys and interface engineered materials. Findings using novel model material analogues for fundamental mechanism exploration are also of interest. • Advanced manufacturing methods that enable scalable, cost-effective fabrication of fusion reactor components, including but not limited to novel powder metallurgy, additive manufacturing, solid state processing, simulations-informed alloy design and processing, etc. • Irradiation effects and synergistic effects under coupled extremes using neutron sources, accelerators, multi-ion beams, environmental test cells, and other tests systems including in situ and in operando techniques and innovative algorithms for high-throughput characterization. • Consideration of off-normal events and associated safety hazards such as the aggressive thermal oxidation and decomposition of plasma facing components in case of air ingress accidents. • Multiscale modeling and simulation of radiation effects including the fundamentals of gas behavior, design of radiation-resistant materials, and integrated studies on materials performance. • Cross-cutting materials science for fusion and fission including fusion prototypic neutron experiments for probing materials degradation toward fusion conditions.

2022 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Mechanical Behavior and Degradation of Advanced Nuclear Fuel and Structural Materials: Organized by Dong Liu; Peng Xu; Simon Middleburgh; Christian Deck; Erofili Kardoulaki; Robert Ritchie

Understanding the mechanical behaviour and performance of nuclear fuel and structural materials in harsh environments in a mechanistic and predictable manner is vital to ensure the safety and regulate nuclear energy systems, from current light water reactors to future advanced reactor systems. It is desirable to reduce the uncertainties in the margins to failure to enhance performance for current reactor fleets to improve their economics, safety, and reliability. The lack of property data of existing materials in new operating regimes often limits the potential to optimise performance (e.g. extend fuel burnup). For the next generation of reactors, novel nuclear fuels and materials need to be qualified and its irradiation performance needs to be assessed. The traditional new fuel qualification approach involves two to three iterations of irradiation and post irradiation examination, typically taking two to three decades to gather enough data for licensing. To meet the aggressive schedule for advanced reactor deployment within the next decade, the fuel qualification process needs to be expedited and requires a paradigm shift. Advanced testing methods and high throughput testing capabilities coupled with a mechanistic understanding from modelling and simulations (including machine learning and data analysis) are key to this shift. To date, a significant amount of research effort has been directed to this field but more is now necessary. It is time to bring together all the researchers from academia, national and international research institutes and nuclear industry to share and discuss the most recent advances in mechanical testing for advanced material systems for nuclear energy. Topics of interest include, but not limited to the mechanical behaviour and properties of: • Accident tolerant fuel and advanced technology fuel (ATF) systems (including both near term and advanced concepts – pellets and cladding). • Materials produced by non-conventional and advanced manufacturing methods • Novel alloy designs and metal composites (experimental and computational designs). • Advanced ceramics and ceramic matrix composites concepts’ properties and in-reactor behaviour. • Environmental separate effects and coupled behaviour such as irradiation and/or coupled with corrosion causing embrittlement, hardening, stress corrosion cracking etc. • High throughput testing and rapid qualification methods including coupling to modelling methods. • Advanced testing methods including micromechanical testing, in-situ techniques coupled with x-ray, synchrotron, and neutron imaging and diffraction • Improve understanding via modelling and simulations, machining learning and data analysis

2022 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Mechanical Behavior at the Nanoscale VI: Organized by Matthew Daly; Douglas Stauffer; Wei Gao; Changhong Cao; Mohsen Asle Zaeem

The mechanical behavior of materials emerges from the aggregate operation of competing deformation mechanisms that initiate at the nanoscale. Small-scale mechanics investigations therefore provide critical insights into the fundamentals of deformation phenomena and form a basis for scaling theories. Additionally, the reduction of organizational scale often yields new deformation mechanisms and mechanical behaviors that are not present in bulk materials. This symposium will focus on the deformation behavior of nanostructured materials. A wide variety of nanostructured materials are considered within this scope including low-dimensional and 2D materials, multilayers, nanoarchitectured materials and nanolattices, and bulk nanocrystalline aggregates. Studies that examine size effects and scaling laws, new nanoscale deformation phenomena, emerging methods in nanomechanical characterization, and developments in modeling techniques are welcomed. Topics will include: • Size effects on elastic properties, strength, plasticity, fracture mechanisms, adhesion, tribology and fatigue behavior in small-volume and low-dimensional systems including nanopillars, nanowires, nanoparticles, nanostructured fibers, 2D materials, thin films, multilayered materials, and nanolattices • New nanoscale deformation phenomena in emerging materials and materials systems including concentrated multi-component solutions (e.g. high entropy alloys), complex alloys, 2D materials, nanotwinned materials, and nanoarchitectured systems • Transitions in deformation mechanisms due to scaling effects such as activation of interface-mediated mechanisms, exhaustion of deformation sources, and size effects on strain-induced phase transformations • Developments in ex situ and in situ (SEM, TEM, synchrotron, neutron, etc.) techniques that push the limits of nanomechanical characterization (e.g. for extreme conditions such as high temperatures and/or high strain rates) • Modeling and simulation of deformation processes and mechanical properties at the nanoscale, including coupling to meso/microscale methods

2022 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Nix Award and Lecture Symposium: Recent Advances in Nanoindentation and Small-Scale Mechanical Testing: Organized by Wendelin Wright; Gang Feng

This symposium will highlight recent advances in nanoindentation and related small-scale mechanical testing methods that have enhanced our fundamental understanding of the deformation mechanisms that underpin the mechanical behavior of macro-, micro-, and nanoscale materials. Presentations will include studies of new testing systems and methods and their application in the study of fundamental processes that control mechanical behavior at the nano- and micro- scales. Efforts to characterize, understand, and predict the mechanical behavior across length scales will be emphasized. This award symposium was established to honor Professor William D. Nix and the tremendous legacy that he has developed and shared with the minerals, metals, and materials community and to highlight and promote continued progress and innovation relevant to research into the underlying mechanisms and mechanical behavior of macro-, micro-, and nanoscale materials. Professor Nix's seminal paper with M.F. Doerner in 1986 set the stage for the development of nanoindentation as a primary enabling tool in this important area of research. Professor Nix’s research and seminal contributions to structural materials, thin films, and nanoscale plasticity have had significant impact on critical U.S. industries, spawned new fields of study, and motivated generations of researchers working in fields that span from aerospace to microelectronics. Breakthroughs in technologies for these critical industries depend heavily on the availability of advanced materials that can be engineered and optimized at the nanoscale. Professor Nix’s groundbreaking contributions have allowed us to characterize, understand, and predict the mechanical behavior and reliability of such materials and have been critical enablers of these key technologies.

2022 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Seeing is Believing -- Understanding Environmental Degradation and Mechanical Response Using Advanced Characterization Techniques: An SMD Symposium in Honor of Ian M. Robertson: Organized by Kaila Bertsch; Khalid Hattar; Josh Kacher; Bai Cui; Benjamin Eftink; Stephen House; May Martin; Kelly Nygren; Blythe Clark; Shuai Wang

Since his arrival in the United States in 1982 with a Doctor of Metallurgy from the University of Oxford, Ian M. Robertson has advanced our physical understanding of materials response under extreme conditions, including gaseous hydrogen atmospheres, corrosive environments, high stress/strain rates, and exposure to radiation. Over forty years of research at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and Wisconsin-Madison, he has pioneered a range of in situ TEM techniques in the areas of environmental TEM, thermomechanical testing, and MEMS-based quantitative mechanical testing, as well as advanced focused ion beam (FIB)-based sample preparation. These techniques were developed with the goal of elucidating the basic physical mechanisms governing plasticity, material degradation, and failure processes. The contributions from his lab permitted the development, refinement, and validation of many theories and theoretical models, most notably the Hydrogen-Enhanced Localized Plasticity (HELP) mechanism for hydrogen embrittlement and determining the criteria for dislocation-grain boundary interactions. His research coupling TEM with advanced theory and simulation has shaped the current state-of-the-art in multiple fields and continues to be applied to increasingly complex materials and environments. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: - Development of advanced in situ TEM techniques - Analysis of late-stage plasticity near crack tips and fracture surfaces - Understanding hydrogen embrittlement mechanisms - Exploring the fundamentals of stress corrosion cracking - Investigating dislocation-interface interactions - Quantifying the stability of materials to irradiation damage This symposium was rescheduled from the TMS 2021 Virtual Annual Meeting & Exhibition.

2022 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Structural Metamaterials: Organized by Amy Wat; Brad Boyce; Xiaoyu Zheng; Fabrizio Scarpa; Robert Ritchie

Recent advances in additive manufacturing have enabled the development of structural metamaterials with novel combinations of mechanical properties and multifunctional capabilities. Mechanical metamaterials can be formed with properties ranging from negative Poisson’s ratio and stiffness, inverted compressibility, fluid-like behavior, to programmable elastic response to mechanical stimuli. Hierarchical materials enable customization of materials with novel combinations of mechanical, optical, or electrical properties. This symposium will focus on structural metamaterials based on metals, which include lattices, periodic surfaces, and architected composite materials. This symposium seeks to further the understanding of architectured structure with on properties including but not limited to elasticity, strength, fracture, fatigue, shock, plastic flow, etc. Beyond mechanical properties, the unusual thermal, electrical, chemical and multi-functional performance of such metamaterials are also relevant. In addition, the symposium emphasizes the effects of the underlying base material and the manufacturing methods used to design and produce metamaterials. Effects such as surface roughness, heterogeneous microstructure, and residual stress are rarely considered in design of metamaterials but can have a profound effect on their ultimate performance and reliability. Topics will include: • Effects of microstructure and defects on metamaterial performance • Manufacturing challenges associated with metamaterials • Multimaterial solutions & architected composites • Effects of length scales on elasticity, strength, fracture, fatigue, dynamic properties, and plastic flow of metamaterials • Changes in deformation caused by architectural features in metamaterials • Ballistic and dynamic compression responses of metamaterials • In-situ and ex-situ mechanical testing methodologies for metamaterials • Modeling and simulation at all scales of mechanical behavior of metamaterials

2022 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Advances in Multi-Principal Elements Alloys X: Structures and Modeling: Organized by Peter Liaw; Michael Gao; E-Wen Huang; Jennifer Carter; Srivatsan Tirumalai; Xie Xie; Gongyao Wang

This symposium will offer the opportunities for discussions and presentations on the current research regarding the experimental and theoretical studies on the mechanical behavior, microstructures, and fabrication of multi-principal elements alloys (MPEAs) or high-entropy alloys (HEAs). BACKGROUND AND RATIONALE: MPEAs, which often consist of five or more elements, typically consist of solid-solution phases in the form of face-centered-cubic (FCC), body-center-cubic (BCC), and hexagonal close-packed (HCP) structures. MPEAs possess desirable properties, including excellent ductility, exceptional corrosion and oxidation resistance, irradiation stability, high strength, fatigue and wear resistance. These aspects make MPEAs potential candidates for use in structural, energy, mechanical, and biomedical fields. Furthermore, recent research has suggested that there is potential for the development of novel MPEAs with functional properties that far exceed those of conventional materials. Topics of interest include but not limited to: (1) Mechanical behavior, such as plastic deformation, creep, fatigue, and fracture (2) Metastable MPEAs (3) Microstructural control of material behavior (i.e., physical, mechanical, corrosion, magnetic electric, irradiation, thermal, and biomedical behavior, etc.) (4) Material fabrication and processing, such as homogenization, nanomaterials, additive manufacturing, and grain-boundary engineering (5) Theoretical modeling and simulation using advanced computational techniques, such as CALPHAD modeling, molecular dynamics, density functional theory, Monte Carlo, as well as phase-field and finite-elements methods (6) Advanced characterization methods, including in situ transmission electron microscopy, neutron scattering, electron backscatter diffraction, and three-dimensional (3D) atom probe, (7) Thermodynamics and diffusivity: measurements and modeling, and (8) Industrial applications This Symposium focuses on the structural characterization, theoretical calculation, and modeling of MPEA.

MS&T21: Materials Science & Technology: Nanotechnology for Energy, Environment, Electronics, Healthcare and Industry: Organized by Gary Pickrell; Navin Manjooran

Nanotechnology has tremendous potential to transform the way we live, work and play. The benefits can range from higher system properties and energy efficiency, to innovative healthcare solutions, to advanced industry products and solutions. This session will have three sub-sections addressing each of the key business drivers in nanotechnology, namely, energy, environment, electronics, healthcare and industry. This symposium will provide researchers worldwide the platform and the opportunity to discuss applications-based research in these key areas of interest. ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT: This session will highlight the applications-based research of nanotechnology in energy, including those enabling greater cost- and energy-efficient and environmentally-friendly systems. Selected topics of interest will be, but are not limited to: (1) nanotechnologies for cleaner and greener environments including aspects of nanotechnologies for carbon capture and sequestration (2) nanotechnology-based sensors, catalysts and devices (3) nanotechnologies for energy harvesting (4) nanomaterials for other innovative energy applications. ELECTRONICS & HEALTHCARE: This session will highlight the applications based research of nanotechnology in electronics and healthcare, including those enabling advancement in healthcare solutions. Selected topics of interest will be, but are not limited to: (1) intelligent delivery systems, nanomedicine, genetherapy (2) medical diagnostics, nano sensors and advanced imaging systems and Tools (3) nano-bio systems, nano-bio robotics (4) health effects of nanotechnology (5) nano-based surface modifications for biofunctionality and/or biocompatibility (6) other nanotechnology-based healthcare and electronics innovations. INDUSTRY: This session will highlight the applications based research of nanotechnology, including those enabling an innovative industry solution. Selected topics of interest will be, but are not limited to: (1) nanopowders and/or composites fabrication and characterization (2) smart coating systems, surface treatments (3) advanced manufacturing technologies (4) smart water technologies including waste water treatment (5) innovative nanosolutions for harsh environments (6) innovative commercial products.

2021 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Additive Manufacturing Fatigue and Fracture V: Processing-Structure-Property Investigations and Application to Qualification: Organized by Nik Hrabe; John Lewandowski; Nima Shamsaei; Mohsen Seifi; Steve Daniewicz

The current understanding of fatigue and fracture behavior of additive manufacturing metals is limited and must be expanded before widespread use in fatigue and fracture critical applications can be fully realized. It is the purpose of this symposium to move toward that expanded understanding by providing a forum to present research results from investigations into fatigue and fracture behavior of additive manufacturing of metals. The symposium will be organized into seven sessions: 1. Microstructure-based Fatigue Studies on Additive-Manufactured Materials (Jointly organized with Fatigue in Materials Symposium) 2. Small-Scale Fatigue and Fracture Test Methods 3. Corrosion and other Environmental Effects on Fatigue and Fracture 4. Residual Stress Effects on Fatigue and Fracture 5. Toward Fatigue Lifing Techniques 6. Surface Roughness Effects on Fatigue and Fracture 7. Role of Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) Techniques in Fatigue and Fracture Processing-structure-property-performance relationships pertinent to this symposium include the following. Processing includes machine settings (e.g. layer thickness), melt parameters (e.g. energy density), post-processing (e.g. heat treatment, surface treatment), and feedstock variables (e.g. flowability, spreadability, particle size distribution) that can directly impact fatigue and fracture performance of parts. Structure includes crystallographic microstructure (e.g. texture), internal defects (e.g. pores, inclusions), external defects (e.g. surface roughness), residual stress, and chemistry. Properties include all fatigue and fracture properties (e.g. high-cycle fatigue, low-cycle fatigue, linear elastic fracture toughness (KIc), elastic-plastic fracture toughness (J-int), fatigue crack growth rate, and impact toughness (Charpy)). Performance includes any end-product testing.

2021 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: AI/Data informatics: Design of Structural Materials: Organized by Jennifer Carter; Amit Verma; Natasha Vermaak; Jonathan Zimmerman; Darren Pagan; Chris Haines; Judith Brown

There is growing recognition that informatics is a promising path forward to accelerating the design of structural materials. In particular, the incorporation of statistical models for uncertainty quantification into phenomenological models for both design and prediction of processing- microstructure-mechanical performance relationships has implications for both fundamental research and industrial development applications alike. Further, the application of mathematical optimization techniques for the design of the material composition, microstructure, and structural topology add further dimensionality to informatics in materials science. To fully realize the potential of materials informatics for structural materials engineering, we need to address an array of challenges associated with the fact that the collection of performance metrics requires destructive testing and quantitative evaluation across many time and length-scales. We invite presentation abstracts on the topics of developing and utilizing informatics tools for discovering, understanding, and predicting processing-microstructure- mechanical performance relationships. A conversation on the needs and limitations of high-throughput synthesis, characterization, and testing, as well as the effect of biased data sets are also valuable contributions to the symposium. Additionally, optimization approaches to design materials with tailored properties would provide valuable discussion of the interdisciplinary toolsets needed to realize new structural material designs. Topics on fatigue and high-temperature structural materials might be better suited in related symposia (i) such as Fatigue in Materials: Fundamentals, Multiscale Characterizations and Computational Modeling, or (ii) Materials Informatics Frameworks for Accelerated Materials Design of High Temperature Alloys, respectively. Potential topics as related to understanding and designing mechanical properties of materials: text mining Statistical modeling Data-driven property discovery Data dimensionality reduction in materials science Multidimensional data visualization for exploratory analysis High-throughput experimental design Intentional gradients in microstructures for combinatorial experiments Multivariable optimization approaches

2021 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Bulk Metallic Glasses XVIII: Organized by Peter Liaw; Yanfei Gao; Hahn Choo; Yunfeng Shi; Robert Maass; Xie Xie; Gongyao Wang

Bridge gap between theoretical developments and industrial applications of BMGs Recently, novel fabrication methods have led to the production of metallic glass specimens with sizes on the order of 8 cm, which are aptly called bulk metallic glasses (BMGs). Importantly, BMGs could possess high fracture strengths, great fracture toughness and elasticity, and have the near-net-shaping fabrication potential. As such, there is a great interest in the industrial and additive manufacturing applications of BMGs with regards to mechanical, structural, and biomedical properties. Some of the important topics to be explored: (1) Essential links among theory, modeling, and experimental methods (2) Applications of amorphous alloy catalysts in industry (3) Additive manufacturing and three dimensional (3-D) printing techniques (4) Nanoglasses and other composite bulk amorphous alloy nanostructures (5) Bio-applications of BMGs (6) Mechanical, corrosion, magnetic, electric, and thermal behavior (7) Other industrial applications

2021 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Fatigue in Materials: Fundamentals, Multiscale Characterizations and Computational Modeling: Organized by Garrett Pataky; Ashley Spear; Antonios Kontsos; Brian Wisner; Jean-Charles Stinville

This symposium features novel methods and new discoveries for understanding material fatigue and life prediction. It brings together scientists and engineers from all over the world to present their latest work on current issues in characterizing and simulating fatigue damage; identification of microstructural weak links; enhancement of fatigue strength and resistance; quantitative relationships among processing, microstructure, environment, and fatigue properties; and life prediction. This symposium provides a platform for fostering new ideas about fatigue at multiple scales and in multiple environments, numerically, theoretically, and experimentally. The symposium will be organized into six sessions: • Data-Driven Investigations of Fatigue • Multiscale Modeling Approaches to Improve Fatigue Predictions • Microstructure-based Fatigue Studies on Additive-Manufactured Materials (Jointly organized with AM Fatigue & Fracture symposium) • Fatigue Characterization Using Advanced Experimental Methods in 2D and 3D • Multi-mechanical Interactions during Extreme Environment Fatigue Loading • Crack Initiation Mechanisms and Short-Crack Growth Behavior

2021 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Heterostructured and Gradient Materials (HGM IV): Tailoring Heterogeneity for Superior Properties: Organized by Yuntian Zhu; Kei Ameyama; Irene Beyerlein; Yves Brechet; Huajian Gao; Hyoung Seop Kim; Ke Lu; Xiaolei Wu

This is the fourth international symposium, which will focus on the fundamental science and technology of Heterostructured and Gradient Materials (HGM), which include, but are not limited to, heterostructured materials, gradient materials, laminate materials, dual-phase materials, harmonic (core-shell) materials, etc. HGM is characterized with large differences in mechanical behaviors among heterostructured zones. The large mechanical incompatibility leads to strong inter-zone interactions. This produces back stress in the soft zones and forward stress in the hard zones, which collectively produce hetero-deformation induced (HDI) strengthening to enhance yield strength and extra HDI work hardening, in addition to conventional dislocation hardening, to retain ductility. This unique deformation behavior is reported to produce a superior combination of high strength and high ductility that is not accessible to either nanostructured or coarse-grained homogeneous materials. HGMs represent an emerging class of materials that is expected to become a major research field for the communities of materials, mechanics and physics in the next few years. The HGM strategy is not only capable of producing structural materials with unprecedented mechanical properties, but also efficient for developing multifunctional materials. Innovative top-down or bottom-up approaches and material architectures, some of which may be bio-inspired, need to be explored and developed to produce HGMs with superior or disruptive properties. There are many fundamental issues that need to be studied by experiments, analytical modeling and computer modeling. Particularly, interface engineering and interface-related phenomena such as strain banding, strain gradient near zone interfaces, geometrically necessary dislocations, and evolution and interaction of internal stressed are critical issues. This symposium, and the future biannual symposia that follow, will act as a forum to bring multidisciplinary researchers together to exchange ideas, discuss key issues, and promote industrial technology development for commercial production and applications.

2021 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: High Entropy Alloys IX: Structures and Modeling : Organized by Peter Liaw; Michael Gao; E-Wen Huang; Srivatsan Tirumalai; Xie Xie; Gongyao Wang

Materials Science & Technology 2020: Additive Manufacturing: Mechanical Behavior of Lattice Structures Produced via AM: Organized by John Carpenter; Matthew Begley; Sneha Prabha Narra; Michael Groeber; Isabella Van Rooyen; Kyle Johnson; Krishna Muralidharan

This symposium will provide a forum to discuss process-structure-property-performance relationships for additively manufactured open cell lattice structures. Additive manufacturing allows for the fabrication of complex geometries including open cell lattice structures that retain some similarities to closed cell structures like foams, but also have unique challenges. The mechanical properties of these structures are difficult to measure and provide significant challenges in analysis, from accurate measurements of strain to determining the applicable area under loading. Small feature dimensions can also lead to the breakdown of scale separation and cause significant property dependence on microstructure. Improvements in measurement technique, witness coupon design, defect – failure mode connections, and material quality-strength connections are of interest to this symposium. Modeling efforts and topological optimization designed to inform design principles or for extracting enhanced understanding of process-structure-property-performance relationships are also of interest. The organizers view the lack of understanding of the process-structure-property-performance relationships as a key problem in making use of these lattices in structural applications.

Materials Science & Technology 2020: Additive Manufacturing: Qualification and Certification: Organized by Faramarz Zarandi; Jacob Hochhalter; Douglas Wells; Richard Russell; Mohsen Seifi; Eric Ott; Mark Benedict; Craig Brice; J Hector Sandoval

Additive manufacturing (AM) provides distinct benefits over conventional manufacturing processes and is increasingly embraced in new products. However, the promotion of AM is challenged by the quality of AM parts and limited available acceptance standards in terms of material properties, dimensional accuracy, and surface perfections. Similar to conventional materials, the understanding of process – microstructure – performance relationship is a key in successful implementation of AM parts. Over the past decade, there has been a considerable efforts in understanding how AM processes impact the defects in AM parts of simple geometries. In contrast, the evolution of performance-driven attributes in AM parts with more complex shapes is much less studied. Moreover, it is now recognized that the thermal processes perfected for conventional materials over several decades may not result in similar optimized properties in their AM counterparts and, hence, new post-build thermal processes are needed for AM parts. In order to address these gaps, both experimental and computational techniques should be utilized to move AM further from just producing topologically optimized parts toward making qualified parts with desired performance. While we are improving our understanding of AM processes and learning how to successfully build complex shapes, we also need to enhance our efforts in identifying challenges in qualifying AM parts and defining approaches to overcome them. Process qualification involves the establishment of material and process specifications in support of process control and acquisition of data to determine statistically-substantiated mechanical properties and design values. Certification of components produced by qualified processes involves demonstration of component performance in expected, service-like conditions. The objective of this symposium is to provide a platform for the AM community to exchange ideas and determine how, for instance, feedstock, process parameters, build strategy and layout, shape and topology, build envelop, and post-build processes can impact local and global microstructures and properties. Discussions and presentations of recent attempts at AM qualification and certification, successes, failures, and future expectations are much encouraged. Such insights will lead to more reliable inspection techniques and help better define AM-related standards. Then, the measures for process calibration and process qualification will be more effectively defined. All these will, eventually, result in faster qualification of AM parts. The symposium scopes include, but are not limited to: - The path to qualification of AM parts; challenges, gaps, standards - Process Control - Feedstock; specifications for AM powders: - Control of feedstock characteristics influencing AM material quality and build quality - Evolution of microstructure and properties: - Effect of build strategy - Post-build thermal processes for desired part properties - The case for using as-built microstructures in service, risks and rewards - The effects of HIP versus homogenization thermal treatments - Key metallurgical characteristics and properties for process qualification: - Determining ‘acceptable’ build envelop with regard to part quality and performance - Schema for mapping metallurgical AM process quality throughout the build volume accounting for thermal history extremes - Definition of calibration ranges in AM machine with regard to part performance - Controlling factors that influence the evolution of microstructure, defects and part quality: - Part geometry, build layout, scan strategies, process parameters - Similarities and differences between coupon properties and part performance, i.e. from test coupons to part - Non-destructive inspection techniques for AM parts

2020 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Bulk Metallic Glasses XVII: Organized by Peter Liaw; Yanfei Gao; Hahn Choo; Yunfeng Shi; Robert Maass; Xie Xie; Gongyao Wang

Provide fundamental understanding and theoretical modeling of processing and mechanical behavior of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) In the last decade, new approaches to fabricating metallic glasses [i.e., by utilizing unique combinations of elements to form metallic-glass alloys] have resulted in the required cooling rate dropping from 105 C/s to as low as 1 C/s, and the specimen size increasing from 0.05 mm to as large as 80 mm. Because of the large sizes possible with this exciting technology, the metallic glasses are called BMGs. Mechanical behavior of BMGs is among the new, exciting fields of research that are fully illustrating their advantages over crystalline alloys. Generally, BMGs have higher fracture strengths, fracture toughnesses, and elasticities than their crystalline counterparts. There is great interest in BMGs for use in biomedical, structural, and mechanical applications. Some of the areas to be explored: (1) Material fabrication and processing (2) Nanocrystalline materials and composites (3) Mechanical behavior (4) Shear band formation, fatigue, deformation, and fracture mechanisms (5) Corrosion, physical, magnetic, electric, thermal, and biomedical behavior (6) Theoretical modeling and simulation (7) Industrial applications

2020 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: High Entropy Alloys VIII: Organized by Peter Liaw; Michael Gao; E-Wen Huang; Srivatsan Tirumalai; Xie Xie; Gongyao Wang

This symposium will provide a new venue for presentation of research on the fundamental understanding and theoretical modeling of high-entropy alloy (HEA) processing, microstructures, and mechanical behavior. In contrast to conventional alloys, which are based upon one principal element, HEAs have multiple principal elements, often five or more. The significantly high entropy of the solid solution stabilizes the solid-solution phases in face-centered-cubic (FCC), body-centered-cubic (BCC), and hexagonal close-packed (HCP) structures against intermetallic compounds. Moreover, carefully-designed HEAs possess tailorable properties that far-surpass their conventional alloys. Such properties in HEAs include high strength, ductility, corrosion resistance, oxidation resistance, fatigue and wear resistance. These properties will undoubtedly make HEAs of interest for use in biomedical, structural, mechanical, and energy applications. Given the novel and exciting nature of HEAs, they are poised for significant growth, not unlike the bulk metallic glass or nanostructured alloy scientific communities, and present a perfect opportunity for a new symposium. Topics of interest include but not limited to: (1) Material fabrication and processing, such as homogenization, nanomaterials, and grain-boundary engineering (2) Advanced characterization, such as neutron scattering and three-dimensional (3D) atom probe (3) Thermodynamics and diffusivity: measurements and modeling (4) Mechanical behavior, such as fatigue, creep, and fracture (5) Corrosion, physical, magnetic, electric, thermal, coating, and biomedical behavior (6) Theoretical modeling and simulation using density functional theory, molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo simulations, phase-field and finite-elements method, and CALPHAD modeling (7) Industrial applications

2020 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Additive Manufacturing Fatigue and Fracture IV: Toward Confident Use in Critical Applications: Organized by Nik Hrabe; Steve Daniewicz; Nima Shamsaei; John Lewandowski; Mohsen Seifi

The current understanding of fatigue and fracture behavior of additive manufacturing metals is limited and must be expanded before widespread use in fatigue and fracture critical applications can be fully realized. It is the purpose of this symposium to move toward that expanded understanding by providing a forum to present research results from investigations into fatigue and fracture behavior of additive manufacturing of metals. The symposium will be organized into six sessions: • Microstructure-based Fatigue Studies on Additive-Manufactured Materials (Jointly organized with Fatigue in Materials Symposium) • Development of New Fatigue and Fracture Test Methods (e.g. small-scale testing) • Environmental Effects on Fatigue and Fracture • Development of Predictive Design Tools (e.g. fatigue lifing techniques, critical flaw size measurements) • Role of Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) Techniques • Quantitative Processing-Structure-Properties-Performance Investigations (more detail below) To further specify the scope of the processing-structure-property-performance investigations, processing includes machine settings (e.g. layer thickness), melt parameters (e.g. energy density), post-processing (e.g. heat treatment, surface treatment), and feedstock variables (e.g. flowability, spreadability, particle size distribution) that can directly impact fatigue and fracture performance of parts. Structure includes crystallographic microstructure (e.g. texture), internal defects (e.g. pores, inclusions), external defects (e.g. surface roughness), residual stress, and chemistry. Properties include all fatigue and fracture properties (e.g. high-cycle fatigue, low-cycle fatigue, linear elastic fracture toughness (KIc), elastic-plastic fracture toughness (J-int), fatigue crack growth rate, and impact toughness (Charpy)). Performance includes any end-product testing.