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FEBRUARY 13-17 · 2005 TMS ANNUAL MEETING · SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA
AM05 Logo
MEHL MEDALIST
Knott
JOHN F. KNOTT
Professor

University of Birmingham
USA
HUME-ROTHERY LECTURER
Mizutani
UICHIRO MIZUTANI
Professor
Nagoya University
Japan
EPD DISTINGUISHED
CO-LECTURER
Bale
CHRISTOPHER W. BALE
Co-Director, Centre de Recherche en Calcul Thermochimique
University of Montreal
Canada
EPD DISTINGUISHED
CO-LECTURER
Pelton
ARTHUR D. PELTON
Co-Director, Centre de Recherche en Calcul Thermochimique
University of Montreal
Canada

TMS Award-Winning Lecturers and Their Presentations

The following distinguished members of the materials science and engineering community are being recognized with awards that include the invitation to make a scholoarly presentation to the attendees of TMS 2005. Check the Calendar of Events for times and locations and the Honors and Awards Page for more details about the award winners.

Institute of Metals Lecture & Robert F. Mehl Medalist

PRESENTATION: "Power in Trust"—How Materials and Fracture Mechanics Deliver Safety and Reliability

ABSTRACT: Modern Society needs power: propulsive power, electrical power. Delivery of this power must be "trustworthy": safe, reliable, sustainable. The lecture reviews not only materials developed over the last fifty years to meet this need, but also the quantitative assessment methods that have been developed in parallel to ensure safe and reliable operation. Detailed attention is paid to two systems which produce both propulsive power and electrical power: the pressurized water reactor and the gas-turbine. For each system, discussion focuses on the demands of service duty, the materials used, the role of non-destructive inspection or quality control and the main threats to integrity. Fracture Mechanics methodologies provide the means to quantify threats and to assess material response in terms of the risk of loss of function or catastrophic failure. The guarantees of safety and reliability rest on maintaining such risks at acceptably low levels.

LECTURER: Professor John F. Knott’s personal research has been in the fields of fracture, fracture mechanics, and mechanisms of sub-critical crack growth in a range of engineering alloys. For many years, he has acted as a consultant for both the UK nuclear industry and the aero-engine industry. He has, therefore, been personally involved in many of the issues raised in his lecture. He was awarded an OBE (Officer of the Order of the British Empire) in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List on June 12, 2004. The citation was “For services to nuclear safety” which is relevant to the topic of his lecture.

Hume-Rothery Award Lecture

PRESENTATION: "Hume-Rothery Rule in Structurally Complex Alloy Phases"

SPONSOR: Electronic, Magnetic & Photonic Materials Division, Structural Materials Division, Jt. EMPMD/SMD Alloy Phases Committee

ABSTRACT: Special emphasis will be put on our understanding of why nature is able to stabilize structurally complex alloy phases like quasicrystals and gamma-brasses, the latter of which has been known as one of the typical Hume-Rothery phases for many years. Most of these structures have been synthesized by using the Hume-Rothery rule that relates fundamental aspects of electronic structure to stability. The Hume-Rothery rule related electronic structure studies on structurally complex alloy phases will be reviewed, followed by its new interpretation based on the first-principle band calculations, which hopefully goes beyond the first naive free electron picture put forward by Mott and Jones in 1936.

LECTURER: Dr. Uichiro Mizutani’s interest in research on phase stability and the work and ideas of Professor Hume-Rothery developed during his stay in the USA, as a post-doctoral Fellow at Mellon Institute in Pittsburgh. Hume- Rothery’s ideas needed further support and development, particularly in the physics of basic property measures, and in the calculations of energy, starting from first principles. With several associates, he devoted a major part of his research at Nagoya University to this field. Particularly rewarding has been the possibility of linking more closely the observed occurrence and structural features of typical electron phases like the gamma-phase, and more recently the stability of quasicrystals, and approximants, to their electronic band structure and the concept of the Brilouin zone. Dr. Mizutani received the Japan Society of Powder and Powder Metallurgy Award for Distinguished Achievement in Research in 1995. He has received many paper awards with the most recent in 2002 from the Japan Institute of Metals for "Development of the Fe2VA1-based alloys as new thermoelectric materials." Dr. Mizutani will be presenting some of his most recent research during this award lecture.

Extraction & Processing Division Distinguished Co-Lecturers

PRESENTATION: "Applications of Computational Thermodynamics in the Real World"

ABSTRACT: Due to the development of sophisticated software for calculating chemical equilibria and of large evaluated databases for compounds and solutions (alloys, slags, ceramics, mattes, salts, aqueous solutions, etc.), one need not be a specialist to apply state-of-the-art thermodynamic calculations to real-life applications in metallurgy and materials science. Applications in process modeling, simulation and control, alloy design, etc. will be presented using the Windows®-based FactSage software and databases of which the authors are codevelopers.

LECTURERS: Drs. Bale and Pelton co-founded the Centre de Recherche en Calcul Thermochimique, University of Montreal, in 1982, which they co-direct. Along with Prof. Bill Thompson they are co-developers of FACT, one of the largest thermodynamic database systems in the world, one of the very few specializing in metallurgical and materials applications, and the only one of its kind in North America. The solution databases of FACT are unique in the world. The FACT system was awarded the Falconbridge Innovation Award in 1999; the first time this award has been given to an academic group. Dr. Pelton is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, an E.W.R. Steacie Memorial Fellow, a Fellow of ASM and CIM, and a recipient of the CODATA award, the Gibbs Triangle Award of Calphad, and the Hume-Rothery prize of the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining. Dr. Bale was President of the Canadian Metallurgical Society in 1988, is a Fellow of the Canadian Institute of Mining Metallurgy and received the Canadian Metal Chemistry Award in 2000.

SEE ALSO: The TMS 2005 short course by Drs. Bale and Pelton: FactSage: An Advanced Thermodynamic Modeling Tool.


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