Alloy Phases Committee

Technical Programming

2018 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Advanced Real Time Optical Imaging: Organized by Jinichiro Nakano; David Alman; Il Sohn; Hiroyuki Shibata; Antoine Allanore

Real time observations can provide important information needed to understand materials behavior, as these techniques can provide valuable insights on mechanisms free from artifacts induced from conventional experimental techniques. Emerging optical imaging techniques are comparatively inexpensive methods that allow such observations. Methods, such as confocal laser microscopy, can be enhanced with capabilities that enable heating and cooling, controlled atmospheres, and application of stresses; and can be used to generate real time thermodynamic and kinetic data needed to study a variety of materials and processes, such as phase transformation, oxidation, corrosion, etc. In-vivo fluorescence methods can be used to provide essential information on the behavior of biomaterials. This symposium intends to encompass a broad range of materials science topics to enable and promote cross-cutting opportunities for multiple disciplines (biomaterials, energy materials, functional materials, structural materials, etc.). Papers are solicited on technique development, as well as, on the application of these methods to materials science and engineering. Topics include, but not limited to: - In-situ, in-operando, in-vitro, and in-vivo observation techniques, such as confocal laser microscopes, thermal imaging furnace, and other optical techniques. - Confocal techniques, including fluorescence and reflection types, which may be equipped with capabilities such as heating/cooling chambers, gas chambers, mechanical testing, Raman spectroscope, and FTIR. - Other optical microscopic or telescopic methods include hot thermocouple, resistance heating, and sessile drop techniques used for high temperature phenomena. - Thermodynamic and kinetic data from these techniques, useful for phase diagram constructions, oxidation/corrosion modeling, phase formation kinetics studies, etc. - Findings of studies on interrogation of materials by these techniques.

2018 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Alloys and Compounds for Thermoelectric and Solar Cell Applications VI: Organized by Sinn-wen Chen; Franck Gascoin; Soon-Jik Hong; Philippe Jund; Lan Li; Takao Mori; Hsin-jay Wu; Tiejun Zhu

This symposium addresses synthesis, property measurements, phase stability, phase transformation of the alloys and compounds used in the thermoelectric and solar cell devices. Materials of interests include, but not limited to, skutterudites, superlattice, half-heusler alloys, CdTe, CIS, CIGS, CZTS and new materials for thermoelectric and solar cell applications.

2018 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: High Entropy Alloys VI: Organized by Peter Liaw; Michael Gao; Xie Xie; Gongyao Wang; E-Wen Huang; Tirumalai Srivatsan

This symposium will provide a new venue for presentation of research on the fundamental understanding and theoretical modeling of high-entropy alloy (HEA) processing, microstructures, and mechanical behavior. In contrast to conventional alloys, which are based upon one principal element, HEAs have multiple principal elements, often five or more. The significantly high entropy of the solid solution stabilizes the solid-solution phases in face-centered-cubic (FCC), body-centered-cubic (BCC), and hexagonal close-packed (HCP) structures against intermetallic compounds. Moreover, carefully-designed HEAs possess tailorable properties that far-surpass their conventional alloys. Such properties in HEAs include high strength, ductility, corrosion resistance, oxidation resistance, fatigue and wear resistance. These properties will undoubtedly make HEAs of interest for use in biomedical, structural, mechanical, and energy applications. Given the novel and exciting nature of HEAs, they are poised for significant growth, not unlike the bulk metallic glass or nanostructured alloy scientific communities, and present a perfect opportunity for a new symposium. Topics of interest include but not limited to: (1) Material fabrication and processing, such as homogenization, nanomaterials, and grain-boundary engineering (2) Advanced characterization, such as neutron scattering and three-dimensional (3D) atom probe (3) Thermodynamics and diffusivity: measurements and modeling (4) Mechanical behavior, such as fatigue, creep, and fracture (5) Corrosion, physical, magnetic, electric, thermal, coating, and biomedical behavior (6) Theoretical modeling and simulation using density functional theory, molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo simulations, phase-field and finite-elements method, and CALPHAD modeling (7) Industrial applications

2018 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Hume-Rothery Award Symposium: Computational Thermodynamics and Its Implications to Kinetics, Properties, and Materials Design: Organized by Suveen Mathaudhu; Michael Gao; Chelsey Hargather; Richard Hennig; James Saal; Dongwon Shin

Thermodynamics is a science concerning the state of a system when interacting with the surroundings. Computational thermodynamics enables quantitative calculations of thermodynamic properties as a function of both external conditions and internal configurations and empowers the new materials research paradigm of integrated computational prediction and experimental validation approaches. The central constituent of computational thermodynamics is the modeling of the thermodynamic description of individual phases in the complete space of external and internal degrees of freedom. Over the past 40 years, the CALPHAD modeling of thermodynamics has proven to be a successful approach applicable to complex multicomponent materials. Integration with first-principles calculations based on density functional theory, which is capable of predicting electronic structures of atomic interactions, have further significantly enhanced the efficiency and robustness of thermodynamic modeling. Computational thermodynamics plays a central role in materials design, integrated computational materials engineering (ICME), and the Materials Genome Initiative (MGI). Two important contributions of computational thermodynamics are to predict the phase stability of a system under given conditions and provide driving forces for internal processes in a system so the evolution of such internal processes can be quantitatively simulated. Furthermore, as first and second derivatives of the free energy with respect to system variables, many physical properties can be calculated such as thermal expansion and elastic properties. Additionally, through the mapping of the energy landscape in the framework of computational thermodynamics, a broad range of properties can be predicted and modeled such as diffusion coefficients, interfacial energy, and dislocation mobility. Applications of these new capabilities include improvements in the understanding of atomic interactions and the role of alloy elements and trace additions on phase stability and phase transformation behavior; improvement of existing materials for enhanced performance; and the design and development of new materials for an optimal combination of properties. The focus of this symposium is to assess the state of the art in computational thermodynamics for predictions and modeling capabilities and to identify the key steps needed to make further progress. Abstracts are invited which contribute to the above themes with critical appraisals of the strengths and weaknesses of various approaches for specific properties and applications. Case studies involving the use of computational thermodynamics to study practical problems are welcomed along with studies involving both advanced experimental work and state-of-the-art modeling approaches. Submission of abstracts to the Hume-Rothery Symposium is by invitation only.

2018 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Phase Stability, Phase Transformations, and Reactive Phase Formation in Electronic Materials XVII: Organized by Shih-kang Lin; Chao-hong Wang; Jae-Ho Lee; Chih-Ming Chen; Thomas Reichmann; Yu Zhong; Hiroshi Nishikawa; Shien Ping Feng; Yee-Wen Yen; Song-Mao Liang

This is the 17th in a series of TMS symposia addressing the stability, transformation, and formation of phases during the fabrication, processing, and utilization of electronic materials and devices. Topics of interests range from microelectronic technologies to advanced energy technologies, including phase stability, transformation, formation, and morphological evolution of electronic packaging materials, interconnection materials, integrated circuit materials, optoelectronic materials as well as energy storage and generating materials.

2017 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Alloys and Compounds for Thermoelectric and Solar Cell Applications V: Organized by Sinn-wen Chen; Franck Gascoin; Soon-jik Hong; Philippe Jund; Lan Li; Takao Mori; Ce-Wen Nan; Hsin-jay Wu

This symposium addresses synthesis, property measurements, phase stability, phase transformation of the alloys and compounds used in the thermoelectric and solar cell devices. Materials of interests include, but not limited to, skutterudites, superlattice, half-heusler alloys, CdTe, CIS, CIGS, CZTS and new materials for thermoelectric and solar cell applications.

2017 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: High Entropy Alloys V: Organized by Peter Liaw; Michael Gao; Suveen Nigel Mathaudhu; Xie Xie; Gongyao Wang; E-Wen Huang

OBJECTIVE: This symposium will provide a new venue for presentation of research on the fundamental understanding and theoretical modeling of high-entropy alloy (HEA) processing, microstructures, and mechanical behavior. BACKGROUND AND RATIONALE: In contrast to conventional alloys, which are based upon one principal element, HEAs have multiple principal elements, often five or more. The significantly high entropy of the solid solution stabilizes the solid-solution phases in face-centered-cubic (FCC), body-centered-cubic (BCC), and hexagonal close-packed (HCP) structures against intermetallic compounds. Moreover, carefully-designed HEAs possess tailorable properties that far-surpass their conventional alloys. Such properties in HEAs include high strength, ductility, corrosion resistance, oxidation resistance, fatigue and wear resistance. These properties will undoubtedly make HEAs of interest for use in biomedical, structural, mechanical, and energy applications. Given the novel and exciting nature of HEAs, they are poised for significant growth, not unlike the bulk metallic glass or nanostructured alloy scientific communities, and present a perfect opportunity for a new symposium. Topics of interest include but not limited to: (1) Material fabrication and processing, such as homogenization, nanomaterials, and grain-boundary engineering (2) Advanced characterization, such as neutron scattering and three-dimensional (3D) atom probe (3) Thermodynamics and diffusivity: measurements and modeling (4) Mechanical behavior, such as fatigue, creep, and fracture (5) Corrosion, physical, magnetic, electric, thermal, coating, and biomedical behavior (6) Theoretical modeling and simulation using density functional theory, molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo simulations, phase-field and finite-elements method, and CALPHAD modeling (7) Industrial applications

2017 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Hume-Rothery Award Symposium: Alloy Phase Chemistry at the Atomic Level - Opportunities and Challenges: Organized by Wei Xiong; Shuanglin Chen; Frederic Danoix; Indrajit Charit

A new generation of experimental and modeling techniques now permits exploration of local phase chemistry at the atomic level. The implications of this work are wide-ranging, both for improving the understanding of existing materials, and for the development of new and improved materials for structural and functional use. Applications include improvements in the understanding of strengthening mechanisms in engineering materials; characterization of the role of alloy elements and trace additions on phase transformation behavior; assessment of safe operating lifetimes of materials under thermal ageing and irradiation conditions; and the design and development of new materials for maximum performance in terms of mechanical, electrical, optical or magnetic properties. Success in these areas is critically dependent on the accuracy and reliability of the experimental techniques being used, and on the quantitative validation of the theoretical models employed. Considerable issues arise at this point. Experimental methods are being pushed to their limits, and benchmarking standards are difficult or impossible to obtain. Theoretical models require simplifying assumptions, which may distort outcomes or reduce the level of confidence in the numerical results obtained. The focus of this symposium is to assess the state of art in atomic-scale characterization and modeling of alloy phase chemistry, and to identify the key steps needed in order to make further progress. What works? What does not work? How can we do better? In the absence of reliable quantitative standards for individual techniques, cross-correlation is required between different experimental methods, between different modeling approaches, and especially between experimental and modeling studies of the same system(s). Papers are invited which contribute to the above themes. Critical appraisals of the strengths and weaknesses of individual techniques (atom probe tomography, X-ray microanalysis, electron energy loss spectroscopy etc.) for specific applications are sought. Case studies involving the use of a range of experimental techniques to study a single materials problem are particularly welcome. Special prominence will be given to studies which involve both advanced experimental work and state-of-the-art modeling approaches.

2017 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Phase Stability, Phase Transformations, and Reactive Phase Formation in Electronic Materials XVI: Organized by Shih-kang Lin; Chao-hong Wang; Jae-Ho Lee; Ikuo Ohnuma; Chih-Ming Chen; Thomas Reichmann; Yu Zhong; Shijo Nagao; Shien Ping Tony Feng; Yee-wen Yen

This is the 16th in a series of TMS symposia addressing the stability, transformation, and formation of phases during the fabrication, processing, and utilization of electronic materials and devices. Topics of interests range from microelectronic technologies to advanced energy technologies, including phase stability, transformation, formation, and morphological evolution of electronic packaging materials, interconnection materials, integrated circuit materials, optoelectronic materials as well as energy storage and generating materials.

2016 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Alloys and Compounds for Thermoelectric and Solar Cell Applications IV: Organized by Sinn-wen Chen; Franck Gascoin; Stephane Gorsse; Yoshisato Kimura; Lan Li; CW Nan; G. Jeffrey Snyder; Hsin-jay Wu

This symposium addresses synthesis, property measurements, phase stability, phase transformation of the alloys and compounds used in the thermoelectric and solar cell devices. Materials of interests include, but not limited to, skutterudites, superlattice, half-heusler alloys, CdTe, CIS, CIGS, CZTS and new materials for thermoelectric and solar cell applications.

2016 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: High Entropy Alloys IV: Organized by Peter Liaw; Michael Gao; Suveen Mathaudhu; Gongyao Wang

OBJECTIVE: This symposium will provide a new venue for presentation of research on the fundamental understanding and theoretical modeling of high-entropy alloy (HEA) processing, microstructures, and mechanical behavior. BACKGROUND AND RATIONALE: In contrast to conventional alloys, which are based upon one principal element, HEAs have multiple principal elements, often five or more. The presence of multi-principal elements leads to simplified microstructures, which in many cases, because high mixing entropy enhances the formation of simple solid-solution phases, such as the face-centered-cubic (FCC) and body-centered-cubic (BCC) structures. Moreover, these alloys often have unprecedented tailorable properties that frequently far-surpass their conventional countpart alloy systems. Such properties in HEAs include high strength, ductility, corrosion resistance, oxidation resistance, fatigue and wear resistance. These properties will undoubtedly make HEAs of interest for use in biomedical, structural, mechanical, and energy applications. Given the novel and exciting nature of HEAs, they are poised for significant growth, not unlike the bulk metallic glass or nanostructured alloy scientific communities, and present a perfect opportunity for a new symposium. Topics of interest include but not limited to: - Material fabrication and processing - Advanced characterization, such as neutron scattering - Thermodynamics and diffusivity - Nanocrystalline materials and composites based on HEAs - Mechanical behavior - Shear-band formation, fatigue, deformation, and fracture mechanisms - Corrosion, physical, magnetic, electric, thermal, coating, and biomedical behavior - Theoretical modeling and simulation - Industrial applications

2016 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Hume-Rothery Award Symposium: Thermodynamics of Materials: Organized by Ursula Kattner; Michael Manley

This symposium will be held in honor of the 2016 Hume-Rothery award recipient, Brent Fultz, in recognition of his groundbreaking contributions to the thermodynamics of materials. The goal of the symposium is to assess the current state of the art in the thermodynamics of materials by bringing together experimental and computational researchers. The awardee's interests are reflected by a special emphasis on entropy, phase stability, thermodynamic property measurements, neutron and x-ray scattering (inelastic, but also elastic), and computation (e.g. DFT, DFT+U, ab initio MD simulations, etc.). The symposium will combine invited and contributed presentations.

2016 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Phase Stability, Phase Transformations, and Reactive Phase Formation in Electronic Materials XV: Organized by Shih-kang Lin; Chao-hong Wang; Jae-Ho Lee; Ikuo Ohnuma; Chih-Ming Chen; Yee-Wen Yen; Shien Ping Feng; Clemens Schmetterer

This is the 15th in a series of TMS symposia addressing the stability, transformation, and formation of phases during the fabrication, processing, and utilization of electronic materials and devices. Topics of interests range from microelectronic technologies to advanced energy technologies, including phase stability, transformation, formation, and morphological evolution of electronic packaging materials, interconnection materials, integrated circuit materials as well as energy storage and generating materials.

2015 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Alloys and Compounds for Thermoelectric and Solar Cell Applications III: Organized by Sinn-wen Chen; Franck Gascoin; St�phane Gorsse; Chih-Huang Lai; Yoshisato Kimura; Ce-Wen Nan; G. Jeffrey Snyder; Hsin-jay Wu

This symposium addresses synthesis, property measurements, phase stability, phase transformation of the alloys and compounds used in the thermoelectric and solar cell devices. Materials of interests include, but not limited to, skutterudites, superlattice, half-heusler alloys, CdTe, CIS, CIGS, CZTS and new materials for thermoelectric and solar cell applications.

2015 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: CALPHAD-Based ICME Research for Materials Genomic Design: Organized by Wei Xiong; Shih-kang Lin; Chao Jiang; Shenyang Hu; Wen-dung Hsu; Sinn-wen Chen; Shuanglin Chen

This symposium provides a discussion forum for the development of the CALPHAD-based ICME tools and their applications for materials genomic design. The aim of this symposium is to bridge the CALPHAD technique and other computational/experimental tools for materials design, such as atomistic modeling, phase field simulation, atom probe tomography, etc. The keynotes of this symposium will invite leading experts in the CALPHAD-based materials design presenting their state-of-the-art activities in materials genomic research. The discussion of the CALPHAD-based designing materials will include but are not limited to, steels, electronic materials, superalloys, light alloys, and energy materials. Experimentalists are particularly encouraged to join the discussion. Four sessions are temporary planned for this symposium, which will cover materials design topics in process, microstructure, properties and performance. The focuses covered in this symposium will be: 1. Development of different computational/experimental techniques as ICME toolkit 2. CALPHAD digital database construction for Materials Genome 3. CALPHAD-based computational/experimental studies for materials design 4. CALPHAD methodology for materials design applications

2015 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Hume-Rothery Award Symposium: Multicomponent Alloy Metallurgy, the Bridge from Materials Science to Materials Engineering: Organized by Ursula Kattner; Mark Asta; Raymundo Arroyave

The 2015 Hume-Rothery Award Symposium will focus on the physical metallurgy of alloys with three or more components. Ternary and higher order alloy topics of interest include: thermodynamics (first principles, atomistics and Calphad), solidification and solidification path analysis; diffusion mobility and diffusion path analysis; and solid state transformations. The symposium will focus on what limits progress in these areas and will combine invited oral presentations and submitted poster contributions.

2015 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Phase Stability, Phase Transformations, and Reactive Phase Formation in Electronic Materials XIV: Organized by Chao-hong Wang; Jae-Ho Lee; Clemens Schmetterer; Ikuo Ohnuma; Shien Ping Feng; Shih-Kang Lin; Chih-Ming Chen; Yee-Wen Yen

This is the 14th in a series of TMS symposia addressing the stability, transformation, and formation of phases during the fabrication, processing, and utilization of electronic materials and devices. Topics of interests include phase stability issues surrounding microelectronics packaging technology or energy materials, phase formation and integrated circuit technology, and the phase stability and morphological evolution of novel electronic materials.