Manuscript Preparation Guidelines

 

TMS Proceedings Manuscript Preparation Guidelines

Manuscript Preparation

Submit your manuscript in either Microsoft Word (preferred file types include .doc, .docx, and .dot) or LaTeX
(file type .tex). PDF manuscript submissions will not be accepted. If you choose to submit your manuscript
in LaTeX format, you must include a separate PDF file for reviewers. This file should be included in the .zip
file that contains your figures (see figure instructions on page 3 below).

Authors using Microsoft Word should create a conventional Word file with the paper title, author names and
affiliations, keywords, and abstract at the beginning. (All these elements must be included.) Create a
hierarchical structure for the headings and then insert text, figure callouts, tables, equations, and references.
Here are some basic guidelines:

  • Open a blank Word document.
  • Use the default styles in Word to identify the heading levels.
  • Use the standard Word functions for displayed lists and type styles such as bold or italics.
  • Use a single main font for the entire text, ideally Times New Roman 10 point.
  • For special characters, please use Symbol and/or Arial Unicode.
Your manuscript will be reformatted in production, so precise formatting of the manuscript file is not necessary.

For LaTex users, Springer provides manuscript preparation tools that help structure the manuscript.
LaTeX2e macro packages 
Alternatively, you may either the standard LaTeX article class and apply the default settings and styles (e.g., for
heading styles, lists, etc.).

Permissions

If excerpts from copyrighted works (including websites) such as illustrations, tables, animations, or text quotations are included in your manuscript, please obtain permission from the copyright holder (usually the original publisher) for both the print and online format. 

 Please comply with the instructions stipulated in the permission(s) concerning acknowledgments or credit lines within your manuscript (e.g., reference to the copyright holder in captions) and keep the written confirmation of the permission in your possession with the copy of your manuscript.

Language

Either British, Australian, or American English can be used but be consistent within your paper. 

Check for consistent spelling of names, terms, and abbreviations, including in tables and figure captions.

Paper Title and Authors

Please include each paper’s authors’ names (spelled out as they would be cited), affiliations and e-mail
addresses, and telephone numbers after the title. (The telephone number will not be published but may be
needed as contact information during the publishing process.) A sample opening page can be found here. 

Abstract

Begin the paper with an abstract that summarizes the content in 150 to 250 words. The abstract will appear
online at SpringerLink and be available with unrestricted access to facilitate online searching.

Don’t include reference citations or undefined abbreviations in the abstract because abstracts are often read
independently of the actual chapter and without access to the reference list.

Keywords

At least three keywords are required. Each keyword should not contain more than two compound words,
and each keyword phrase should start with an uppercase letter. Chemical symbols are permitted.

When selecting the keywords, think of them as terms that will help someone locate your chapter at the top
of the search engine list using, for example, Google. Very broad terms (e.g., ‘Case study’ by itself) should
be avoided.

Headings and Heading Numbering

Heading levels should be clearly identified and each level should be uniquely and consistently formatted
and/or numbered.

Terminology, Units, and Abbreviations

Technical terms and abbreviations should be defined the first time they appear in the text.

Use internationally accepted signs and symbols for units (SI units).

Greek letters and other special characters should be added as special characters in the same font as the rest
of the text.

Numerals should follow the British/American method of decimal points to indicate decimals and commas to
separate thousands. A sample page can be found here.

Formal Style

Manuscripts will be checked by a copy editor for formal style. Springer follows certain standards with
regard to the presentation of the content, and the copy editors make sure that the manuscript conforms to
these styles. A sample page can be found here.

Tips:

  • Italics should be used for emphasized words or phrases in running text, but do not format entire paragraphs in italics.
  • In addition, use italics for mathematical/physical variables and prefixes in chemical compounds.
  • Sans serif (e.g., Arial) and nonproportional font (e.g., Courier) can be used to distinguish the literal text of computer programs from running text.
  • Do not set entire pages as text boxes because this affects online readability.

Footnotes

Never use footnotes instead of a reference list. When notes are needed within the text, use footnotes instead
of endnotes.

Footnotes should not consist of a reference citation. Footnotes should not contain figures, tables and/or the
bibliographic details of a reference.

Equations and Program Code

In Word, use the Math function of Word 2007 or 2010, MathType, or Microsoft Equation Editor with Word
2003 to create your equations, and insert the graphic into your text file as an object.

In LaTeX, use the Math environment to create your equations.

Tables

Give each table a caption. Add a reference citation to the table source at the end of the caption, if necessary.

Number tables consecutively and ensure that all tables are cited in the text in sequential order.

Use the table function to create and format tables. Do not use the space bar or multiple tabs to separate
columns and do not use Excel to create tables as this can cause problems when converting your tables into
the typesetting program and other formats. A page with sample tables can be found here.

Tips:

  • Simple, one-column lists should not be treated as tables. Use the displayed list function instead.
  • Save the tables in the same file as text, references, and figure captions.
  • Do not manually insert table rules in the manuscript because they cannot be retained.

Figures and Illustrations

Numbering: Number the figures and ensure that all figures are cited in the text in sequential order.

Captions: Give each figure a concise caption, describing accurately what the figure depicts. A page with
sample figures can be found here.

Identify all elements found in the figure in the figure caption and use squares, circles, etc. as coordinate
points in graphs instead of color lines.

If a figure is reproduced from a previous publication, include the source as the last item in the caption.

File preparation: A figure is an object that is drawn or photographed. It does not consist solely of characters
and thus cannot be keyed.

It is preferred but not mandatory that all figures are provided as separate files compressed into a single .zip file, which can be
uploaded along with your manuscript. Place a callout in the text where the figure should be inserted. Include
each caption at the end of the text file, not in the figure file.

 If it is not possible to provide figures as separate files, embed the figures in the text exactly where they
should appear and include a caption with each figure.

Graphics and diagrams should be saved as EPS files with the fonts embedded. Microsoft Office files (Excel
or PowerPoint) can be submitted in the original format (xls, xlsx, ppt, pptx). Figures submitted as PDF files
are not acceptable.

Scanned graphics in TIFF format should have a minimum resolution of 1200 dpi.

Photos or drawings with fine shading should be saved as TIFF with a minimum resolution of 300 dpi.

A combination of halftone and line art (e.g., photos containing line drawings or extensive lettering, color
diagrams, etc.) should be saved as TIFF with a minimum resolution of 600 dpi.

Tips:

  • Color figures will appear in color online but will be printed in black and white. In that case, do not refer to color in the captions and make sure that the main information will still be visible if converted to black and white.
  • Ensure consistency by using similar sizing and lettering for similar figures. Ideally, you should size figures to fit in the page or column width.
  • To add lettering, it is best to use Helvetica or Arial (sans serif fonts) and avoid effects such as shading, outline letters, etc. Keep lettering consistently sized throughout your final-sized artwork. Variance of type size within an illustration should be minimal, e.g., do not use 8-pt type on an axis and 20-pt type for the axis label.

References

In-text citations: All text references should be consecutively numbered, using square brackets with the period
after the reference; for example [1, 2].

Reference list: All papers must include a reference list that has all works that are cited in the chapter and that
have been published (including on the Internet) or accepted for publication. Personal communications and
unpublished works should only be mentioned in the text. Do not use footnotes as a substitute for a reference list.

Reference samples:

BOOK

One Author
1. Robert D. Pehlke, Unit Processes of Extractive Metallurgy (New York, NY: American Elsevier Publishing
Company, 1973), 175-199.

Two or three authors
2. Ulrich Rembold, Karl Armbruster, and Wolfgang Ulzmann, Interface Technology for Computer-Controlled
Manufacturing Processes 
(New York, NY: Marcell Dekker, Inc., 1985), 103.

More than three authors
3. R.L. Gibbey et al., Fast Breeder Reactor Fuel Performance (LaGrange Park, IL: American Nuclear Society,
1979), 188.

Editor, compiler, translator
4. Lawrence E. Murr, ed., Industrial Materials Science and Engineering (New York, NY: Marcel Dekker, Inc.
1985), 98.

5. Robert C. Bates. “A Model for Striation Spacing in Fatigue Crack Growth,” Fracture: Interactions of
Microstructure, Mechanisms and Mechanics
, ed. J.M. Wells and J.D. Landes (Warrendale, PA: The
Metallurgical Society of AIME, 1984), 255-284.

Multivolume work or series
6. H. Baker et al., eds., Metals Handbook, vol. 2 (Metals Park, OH: American Society for Metals, 1979), 60.

JOURNAL

Volume and year
7. E.H. Lee, R.L. Mallet, and W.H. Yang, “Stress and Deformation Analysis of the Metal Extrusion Process,”
Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, 10 (1977), 339-353.

Volume, issue and year
8. M.J. Cooke et al., “LPCVD of aluminum and Al-Si Alloys for Semiconductor Metallization,”
Solid State Tech, 25 (12) (1982), 62-65.

9. B.L. Agarwal, “Postbuckling Behavior of Composite Shear Webs,” A.I.A.A. Journal, 19 (F)
(1981), 933-939.

Year as volume number
10. A.H. Cottrell and P.R. Swann, “Technical Lessons for Flixborough, A Metallurgical Examination of the
Eight-Inch Line,” The Chemical Engineer, 1979, no. 4:266-274.

UNPUBLISHED PAPERS

Reports
11. D.N. Robinson, “A Unified Creep-Plasticity Model for Structural Metals at High Temperature” (Report
ORNL/TM-5969, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1978).

Dissertation or thesis
12. B.G. Snyder, “Superplasticity in Ferrous Laminated Composites” (Ph.D. thesis, Stanford
University, 1982), 45-51.

Paper presented at meeting
13. P.B. Queneau, “Behavior of Magnesium Sulfate During Acid Pressure Leaching Nickeliferous Laterite Ore”
(Paper presented at the 113th AIME Annual Meeting, Los Angeles, California, 28 February 1984), 5.

Manuscript Submission Checklist

Final title checked
  • All author names included and checked for accuracy
  • E-mail address of corresponding author included
  • Abstract included
  • Keywords included
  • Text heading levels and special text elements consistently styled
  • No heading levels skipped
  • Reference list included
  • Citations in text agree with reference list
  • Figures consecutively numbered within chapter
  • Figures consecutively cited in text
  • Tables prepared with the table function
  • Tables consecutively numbered within chapter
  • Tables consecutively cited in text
  • Permissions obtained for all material from other work
  • Copyright form uploaded with Manuscript