Shaping and Forming Committee

Technical Programming

2022 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Ultrafine-grained and Heterostructured Materials (UFGH XII): Organized by Penghui Cao; Xiaoxu Huang; Enrique Lavernia; Xiaozhou Liao; Lee Semiatin; Nobuhiro Tsuji; Caizhi Zhou; Yuntian Zhu

Ultrafine-grained and heterostructured materials have been drawing great attention from the materials research community because of their superior mechanical and functional properties. Heterostructures with UFG zones as the primary microstructural component and CG zone as the minor component represents a new approach to further enhance the properties of UFG materials produced by severe plastic deformation. It has been reported to be able to produce unprecedented combinations of mechanical properties that are not accessible to homogeneous materials. More importantly, heterostructured materials can be produced using industrial facilities for large-scale production at low cost. Significant research has been conducted in recent years to understand the underlying mechanisms that control the mechanical behaviors of UFG and heterostructured materials. This symposium focuses on all aspects of the science and technology of heterostructured and UFG materials and covers a broad scope, ranging from fundamental science to their industrial applications. Specific topics include but are not limited to: -Fundamental issues in processing UFGH materials including, but not limited to, medium to severe plastic deformation techniques - Deformation mechanisms of UFGH materials - Novel UFG and heterostructures - Mechanical and physical properties of UFGH materials - Radiation-tolerant UFGH material - Multiscale modeling of deformation and fracture - Other processing methods for UFGH materials, such as powder processing and rapid-solidification, mechanical and/or thermal processing

2021 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Deformation Induced Microstructural Modification: Organized by Arun Devaraj; Suveen Mathaudhu; Kester Clarke; Bharat Gwalani; Daniel Coughlin

Mechanical deformation without an external heating can be used to modify the microstructure of metallic alloys to achieve supersaturation of solutes, nanoscale precipitate morphology, high density of defect structures, achieve novel phase equilibria and obtain non-equilibrium grain boundaries and interfaces. In the recent development of metallic alloy processing methods such as solid phase processing, understanding how deformation modifies the microstructure of metallic alloys in solid state is crucial. This symposium will bring together researchers specifically studying the microstructural engineering using deformation processing. This can include traditional severe plastic deformation methods, friction stir processing/welding methods and other deformation processing methods. The emphasis of this session will also include using deformation to either accelerate equilibrium phase transformations or to arrive at microstructural states not achievable by conventional thermomechanical processing methods.

2021 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Friction Stir Welding and Processing XI: Organized by Yuri Hovanski; Piyush Upadhyay; Yutaka Sato; Nilesh Kumar; Anton Naumov

This symposium is the eleventh friction stir welding and processing symposium during TMS Annual Meetings. This symposium will present fundamentals and the current status of friction stir welding (FSW) and solid-state friction stir processing of materials. It will provide researchers and engineers with an opportunity to review the current status of the friction stir related processes and discuss the future possibilities. Papers are sought on all aspects of friction stir welding and processing including their various derivative technologies. Abstracts are requested in the following general topic areas related to friction stir technologies: • derivative technologies • high temperature & lightweight applications • industrial applications • dissimilar alloys and/or materials • controls & non-destructive examination • simulation • characterization

2021 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Phonons, Electrons and Dislons: Exploring the Relationships Between Plastic Deformation and Heat: Organized by Aashish Rohatgi; Sean Agnew; Thomas Bieler

While the simple fact that plastic deformation efficiently converts mechanical energy (work) into heat is well known, many questions regarding this (and related) phenomenon are still unanswered or are not universally accepted. For example, what factors (composition, microstructure, etc.) determine the fraction of work which is converted into heat, what are the mechanisms of converting deformation to heat, and what is the role of “phonon radiation” of dislocations as they move at high velocities? Numerous research topics are affected since these heating effects can lead to helpful or harmful plastic instabilities during high-strain-rate deformation (Hopkinson bar tests, plate-impact tests, shock-deformation), shear-banding, friction stir welding/processing, machining, ball milling, etc. The topic of heat generation is typically addressed by using thermocouples or infra-red cameras to record the temperature rise associated with a corresponding plastic strain, but usually, there is less clarity or discussion around the mechanisms of heat generation. In conditions where visual or contact access is not possible, indirect methods to infer heating history or simulations are required, which includes assessment of degrees of dynamic recovery or recrystallization as an indicator of local heating history. On the flip-side, it is becoming increasingly clear that the mere presence of dislocations in the lattice can be used to engineer the thermal and electrical transport of materials relevant to applications as diverse as thermoelectrics, optoelectronics, topological insulators, and superconductors. An emergent theoretical construct known as a “dislon” has recently been introduced, which promises to explain such diverse manifestations of the interactions between phonons, electrons and dislocations. Therefore, this symposium aims to provide a forum for reporting experimental, computational, and theoretical methods to understand both, heat generation and heat transfer in materials, through the interactions between phonons, electrons and dislons. Research exploring the fundamental physics, in association with experimental validation, is also encouraged.

2021 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: TMS-DGM Symposium: A Joint US-European Symposium on Linking Basic Science to Advances in Manufacturing of Lightweight Metals: Organized by William Joost; Norbert Hort

Lightweight metals such as Al and Mg continue to find increasing application in engineering systems for transportation, energy, human welfare, and infrastructure. Driving towards ever increasing benefits will require that we leverage advances in the fundamental metallurgy of these alloys towards improvements in manufacturing. This joint symposium between TMS and DGM (the German Materials Society) is a forum for exchange and discussion of state-of-the-art results that provide insight into previously unknown characteristics and mechanisms in Al and Mg alloys and their connections with manufacturing technology. Examples include new details and understanding of deformation mechanisms, reports of novel metallurgical and microstructural features and kinetics, and discovery of unique process-structure-property relationships. This symposium will emphasize: • Advanced characterization results, particularly three dimensional and/or time varying measurements • Unique theory and modeling results, including process and manufacturing models • New directions in manufacturing, excluding additive manufacturing, such as metamorphic manufacturing, high strain processing, and unique industrial processes moving towards implementation All abstracts and presentations must include discussion of new advances in the basic science of lightweight alloys as well as implications for improved manufacturing capabilities.

2020 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Bladesmithing 2020: Organized by Michael West; Roxana Ruxanda; David Sapiro

The Bladesmithing 2020 symposium will take the form of a traditional symposium with technical presentations focusing on bladesmithing processes and procedures. This symposium provides an opportunity for students or student teams to present their work associated with, or inspired by, the 2017 and 2019 Bladesmithing competition as well as for new entries from students, student teams, and seasoned bladesmithing TMS members. Participants may use any starting material, from commercial stock material to material smelted from ore. Students and student teams are required to have a faculty sponsor and are expected to observe all of their campus’ applicable policies. All work must be performed safely with elements of those safety procedures apparent in the presentation. Final presentations should provide information on the justification for choice of blade, any historical relevance, materials characterization, mechanical and thermal treatments, processing of ore, etc.
Presentations will take the form of conventional talks, although posters may be invited if the number of entries exceeds session capacity. Actual blades are not to be brought to the conference, but safe metallurgical samples are allowed and encouraged. Abstracts can be brief (at a minimum it must include a title, university, name(s) of team members, and blade material) and should be submitted by October 15, 2019.
A brief abstract explaining the historical background, blade material, processing steps involved and characterization performed on the blades should be included.
NOTE: The following information is required to complete this submission: 1. A title 2. An abstract and supporting information, including: - A brief abstract (maximum abstract length 150 words) - Name & email of the primary contact person (not a faculty advisor) - Names of other team members, if known - University affiliation

2020 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Advanced Characterization Techniques for Quantifying and Modeling Deformation: Organized by Rodney McCabe; Thomas Bieler; Marko Knezevic; Irene Beyerlein; Wolfgang Pantleon; C. Tasan; Mariyappan Arul Kumar

Objective: This symposium will provide a venue for presentations regarding the use of advanced characterization techniques in all classes of materials to quantify and model deformation mechanisms. Background and Rationale: Advances in characterization technology have greatly improved our ability to quantify deformation mechanisms such as dislocations, twinning, and stress induced phase transformations, and the microstructural changes accompanying deformation such as texture evolution, grain morphology changes, and localized strain. A variety of relatively new techniques are being applied to both structural and functional materials. These techniques, in combination with modeling, are improving our understanding of deformation and failure during material processing/forming and under normal or extreme conditions in service. In situ techniques are also providing enhanced understanding of individual mechanism interactions and direct validation of plasticity models. This gathering provides a place to talk about new advances in current techniques or in technique development as they apply to deformation. Areas of interest include, but are not limited to: (1) Dislocations, deformation twins, and stress induced phase transformations (2) All advanced X-Ray-based techniques (3) All advanced electron-based techniques including HR-(S)TEM, EBSD, HR-EBSD, PED, and in situ TEM (4) All structural and functional materials systems (5) Advances in material modeling through the use of advanced characterization techniques (6) Industrial applications (7) Technique development

2020 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Advanced Solid Phase Processing Symposium: Organized by Suveen Mathaudhu; Cynthia Powell; Kester Clarke; Anthony Reynolds; Mostafa Hassani

A grand challenge in the production of next-generation transformative materials at scale is to develop manufacturing methods that can circumvent the constraints on chemistry and structure imposed by melt-based processing approaches, and exploit the potential of non-equilibrium synthesis pathways to produce materials with extraordinary performance. Solid Phase Processing (SPP) is one high-potential approach to meeting this grand challenge for metals synthesis and fabrication. In SPP methods (such as friction stir processing/welding, shear assisted processing and extrusion, friction extrusion, cold-spray, ultrasonic consolidation of powders or foil, solid-state additive manufacturing, and in some cases, severe plastic deformation methods such as high pressure torsion, equal channel angular extrusion/pressing and accumulative roll bonding), a high shear strain is introduced into the material, creating a mechanical-thermal coupling that facilitates diffusional processes and phase transformations without requiring the alloy be melted. Because the thermal energy required for material flow is generated entirely by the frictional effects of the process itself, no external heating is required; and the potential exists for rapid heating and cooling, combined with kinetically-driven atomic movement, to enable controlled production of metastable phases. However, a fundamental understanding of the deformation physics, how they affect microstructural evolution, and in turn, how these influence the mechanical/functional behavior, are lacking. Such understanding is critical to harness the potential of SPP methods for unprecedented materials performance. This symposium is intended to cover a broad scope of solid phase processing fundamental studies up to potential applications. It will provide a forum to discuss fundamental physics and deformation mechanisms during SPP and microstructural evolution under SPP conditions. Abstracts are solicited that cover emerging processing approaches, characterization and theory/modeling of SPP methods and novel experimental approaches that reveal the deformation physics, analysis of defects, and their role of the resulting microstructural evolution and properties. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to: •Novel process condition probing methods for microstructural evolution correlation •Advanced characterization techniques (e.g. in-situ electron microscopy, light source studies, nano/micromechanical testing, tribological approaches, etc.) •Micro-, meso- and nanoscale theory and modeling of deformation (e.g. ab-initio, MD simulations, phase field simulations, etc.) •Explorations of the deformation or rapid thermal processing conditions promoting persistent metastable phases •Characterization of SPP material performance in extreme environments (mechanical, irradiation, corrosion, etc.) To avoid overlap with traditional friction stir welding/processing, preference will be given to papers highlighting fundamental insights, novel in-situ studies, broadly applicable computational tools in emerging SPP platforms, technologies and advancements.

2020 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Material Behavior Characterization via Multi-Directional Deformation of Sheet Metal: Organized by Daniel Coughlin; Kester Clarke; Piyush Upadhyay; John Carsley

Engineering sheet metals are customarily characterized by simple mechanical tests in order to meet mechanical properties given in OEM specifications. A set of uniaxial tension tests suffice to provide various standardized properties such as yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, strain hardening coefficient, Lankford coefficients, strain rate sensitivity and forming limits. However, when OEMs stamp a blank sheet to shape their final products, the materials experience quite complicated histories of straining paths that may significantly differ from behavior that is characterized by conventional mechanical tests. For example, sheet metals usually experience much higher strain rates, which may lead to phase transitions in the case of multiphase advanced high strength steels. Additionally, the amount of strain during a stamping process can far exceed what is typically obtained by the standard uniaxial tension test. Critical areas of a stamping often experience changes in the strain path. The advanced constitutive models of today require material parameters obtained under multiaxial and complex loading conditions. Over the past decades, the sheet metal forming community has observed that such advanced constitutive models improve the predictive accuracy on formability and springback. However, in order to successfully train the models, unconventional experimental methods are often required. Here a list of notable experimental methods is given: 1) the cruciform test was designed to strain sheet metals in various stress ratios; 2) The tension-compression test was designed to provide a deformation history representing the bending and unbending of sheets during stamping; 3) The hydraulic bulge test is a widely spread method to obtain hardening curves to large levels of plastic strain, which standard uniaxial tests cannot provide; 4) Combination of non-coaxial loadings can provide various stress states, to which the phase transition is sensitive; 5) An experimental setup consisting of multiple steps with various pre-strainings is also practiced in order to observe constitutive behaviors under complex histories of deformation that may occur in typical industrial stamping processes; 6) High speed tests can subject the materials to a rate of speed similar to what is actually observed during the stamping process. The objective of this symposium is to explore numerous advances in experimental testing and computational methods used for material characterization, constitutive modeling, and analyses pertaining to sheet metal deformation in multiple directions along multiple axes or with changing strain path conditions. Potential participants are encouraged to submit abstracts on research of material behavior related to microstructure based on multiple directional deformation including but not limited to: improvements and new methods of mechanical property measurement; characterization of phase transformations and deformation mechanisms in multiphase microstructures during forming; theory and modeling related to the mechanical properties; deformation simulations, forming processes, friction and springback; multi-directional mechanical testing and advanced strain/stress measurements; integration of scientific knowledge with manufacturing practices; and development of accurate constitutive relationships.

2020 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Purveyors of Processing Science and ICME: A SMD Symposium to Honor the Many Contributions of Taylan Altan, Wei Tsu Wu, Soo-Ik Oh, and Lee Semiatin: Organized by Adam Pilchak; Ayman Salem; Viola Acoff; Nathan Levkulich; Michael Glavicic; Yufeng Zheng; John Joyce-Rotella

The ability to design and repeatedly produce complex, highly durable components for demanding aerospace applications is generally taken for granted these days, but this was not always the case. Edisonian techniques and institutional knowledge were the prevailing methods to choose alloys and develop processing routes with a primary focus of form over function. Little attention was paid to material microstructure and its evolution over the course of processing, and even fewer attempts were made to model it. This all changed when a small group of scientists and engineers came together at Battelle Memorial Institute in the late 1970’s and worked on a wide range of metals processing techniques. Their early success, leveraging the momentum building in the steel industry during World War 2, stemmed from their combined expertise in mechanics, metallurgy, processing science, and computational methods. Their work was constantly advancing the state of the art and often far before the rest of the world was ready for it. For example, their team was the primary contractor for the very first Air Force Materials Lab Processing Science Program. During this program, the team developed (what we call now) a foundational engineering problem using integrated computational materials science and engineering (ICME, or "ICMSE" in some places) to optimize the process for creating a dual-microstructure/dual-property Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo disk – and they did this ~25 years before the widespread adoption of ICME in our community. They were masters of understanding processes and developing practical simulations of them. They devised elegant and convincing validation experiments and paid careful attention to boundary conditions, process parameters, and material behavior under processing conditions. Their work at Battelle and that which followed when they each went their separate ways has touched every facet of metals processing including: solid, liquid, and vapor phase processes, power and wrought metallurgy, conventional and solid state joining processes, high-speed machining processes, and additive manufacturing (a decade before the current explosion of effort). Their work touched a vast array of technologically important materials including titanium and its alloys, nickel-base and cobalt-base superalloys, aluminum alloys, various intermetallics, and high entropy alloys, among others. Within these alloy systems, the honorees have contributed well over 1,000 papers to the body of literature on analytical and numerical modeling of microstructure and texture evolution and collectively advised over 200 graduate students! Their work led to the formation of a small business focused on simulating virtually every aspect of the metals processing value stream in the early 1990’s. This company continues to thrive today and is an integral part of the aerospace metals supply chain that produces flight-critical rotating components. The contributions of Taylan Altan, Wei Tsu Wu, Soo-Ik Oh, and Lee Semiatin to the field of processing science are so vast and impactful that it is the Structural Materials Division’s great pleasure to honor their lifetime of achievements at TMS 2020. Paying homage to the honorees lifelong commitment to developing and validating process models, this symposium will remain alloy-agnostic and instead keep central themes of processing, process simulation, and modeling the evolution of microstructure/texture/defects during processing. Hence, this symposium seeks papers on any metallic material system in the following areas: (1) wrought processing, (2) powder production, (3) powder processing, (4) melting and casting, (5) solid-state joining operations, (6) additive manufacturing, (7) machining operations, and (8) application of numerical methods in processing. Preference will be given to papers that combine experiment with modeling for greater insight into material behavior and also those that span more than one of the above topic areas. Invited speakers from academia and government labs will highlight the honoree’s technical breadth and depth while those from industry will highlight the impact of their work in a production environment.

2019 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Advanced Characterization Techniques for Quantifying and Modeling Deformation: Organized by Rodney McCabe; Thomas Bieler; Marko Knezevic; Irene Beyerlein; Wolfgang Pantleon; C. Tasan; Mariyappan Arul Kumar

Objective: This symposium will provide a venue for presentations regarding the use of advanced characterization techniques in all classes of materials to quantify and model deformation mechanisms. Background and Rationale: Advances in characterization technology have greatly improved our ability to quantify deformation mechanisms such as dislocations, twinning, and stress induced phase transformations, and the microstructural changes accompanying deformation such as texture evolution, grain morphology changes, and localized strain. A variety of relatively new techniques are being applied to both structural and functional materials. These techniques, in combination with modeling, are improving our understanding of deformation and failure during material processing/forming and under normal or extreme conditions in service. In situ techniques are also providing enhanced understanding of individual mechanism interactions and direct validation of plasticity models. This gathering provides a place to talk about new advances in current techniques or in technique development as they apply to deformation. Areas of interest include, but are not limited to: (1) Dislocations, deformation twins, and stress induced phase transformations (2) All advanced X-Ray-based techniques (3) All advanced electron-based techniques including HR-(S)TEM, EBSD, HR-EBSD, PED, and in situ TEM (4) All structural and functional materials systems (5) Advances in material modeling through the use of advanced characterization techniques (6) Industrial applications (7) Technique development

2019 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Friction Stir Welding and Processing X: Organized by Yuri Hovanski; Rajiv Mishra; Yutaka Sato; Piyush Upadhyay; David Yan

This symposium is the tenth friction stir welding and processing symposium during TMS Annual Meetings. This symposium will present fundamentals and the current status of friction stir welding (FSW) and solid-state friction stir processing of materials. It will provide researchers and engineers with an opportunity to review the current status of the friction stir related processes and discuss the future possibilities. Papers are sought on all aspects of friction stir welding and processing including their various derivative technologies. Abstracts are requested in the following general topic areas related to friction stir technologies: derivative technologies; high temperature applications, industrial applications, dissimilar alloys and/or materials, lightweight alloys, simulation, and characterization.

2018 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Additive Manufacturing of Metals: Establishing Location Specific, Processing-Microstructure-Property-Relationships III: Organized by Eric Lass; Mark Stoudt; Judy Schneider; Lee Semiatin; Behrang Poorganji; Clay Houser

Advances in additive manufacturing (AM) technology have created the ability to design and construct components with geometries and properties that cannot be achieved through traditional solidification and deformation processes. This ability has promoted multiple new design strategies whose success relies on close integration of engineering and materials science. An additional attractive aspect of additive processing is the ability to custom design specific properties within the component by layering, thereby promoting different microstructures or compositions (e.g., functionally-graded materials). However, the repetitive rapid solidification that occurs during AM also creates microstructures that deviate significantly from those observed in wrought materials with the same nominal composition. The result is a segregated microstructure with significant variations in local composition/phases, and, in some cases, life-limiting defects that are typically absent in wrought alloys. Most of the AM research currently focuses on refining the build process and on minimizing the residual stresses generated during the build. Consequently, there is far less emphasis on post-build heat treatments that homogenize the as-built microstructures and promote similar properties to wrought alloys. The main objective of this symposium is to develop a better understanding of the input-material requirements, process capabilities, and the resultant effects on finished product microstructure, texture, and properties. Research that elucidates the process-structure-property-performance relationships resulting from rapid solidification and transient phase transformations is essential. Information regarding the influence of inherent defects on the performance of AM-produced components is also greatly needed. Abstracts are requested that relate transient phenomena, recrystallization, transformation, and rapid solidification to additive manufacturing and its influence on phases, microstructure, and properties. Technical sessions emphasizing the following specific topics are planned: • Microstructure evolution in aluminum alloys, stainless steels and aerospace alloys (e.g., Ti, Ni alloys) • Texture measurements and control in AM parts • Defects and their effect on post-build (service) properties • Residual stress evolution and control • Novel applications, complex geometries fabricated via AM • Modeling of AM processes (including liquid and solid-state phase transformation behavior) • Emerging AM processes

2018 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Advanced Characterization Techniques for Quantifying and Modeling Deformation: Organized by Rodney McCabe; Thomas Bieler; Marko Knezevic; Irene Beyerlein; Wolfgang Pantleon; C. Tasan

This symposium will provide a venue for presentations regarding the use of advanced characterization techniques in all classes of materials to quantify and model deformation mechanisms. Background and Rationale: Advances in characterization technology have greatly improved our ability to quantify deformation mechanisms such as dislocations, twinning, and stress induced phase transformations, and the microstructural changes accompanying deformation such as texture evolution, grain morphology changes, and localized strain. A variety of relatively new techniques are being applied to both structural and functional materials. These techniques, in combination with modeling, are improving our understanding of deformation and failure during material processing/forming and under normal or extreme conditions in service. In situ techniques are also providing enhanced understanding of individual mechanism interactions and direct validation of plasticity models. This gathering provides a place to talk about new advances in current techniques or in technique development as they apply to deformation. Areas of interest include, but are not limited to: (1) Dislocations, deformation twins, and stress induced phase transformations (2) All advanced X-Ray-based techniques (3) All advanced electron-based techniques including HR-(S)TEM, EBSD, HR-EBSD, PED, and in situ TEM (4) All structural and functional materials systems (5) Advances in material modeling through the use of advanced characterization techniques (6) Industrial applications (7) Technique development

2018 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Ultrafine-grained Materials X: Organized by Suveen Mathaudhu; Irene Beyerlein; Avinash Dongare; Chong Soo Lee; Terry Lowe; Srikanth Patala; Lee Semiatin; Jason Trelewicz; Janelle Wharry; Caizhi Zhou

This is the tenth international symposium that focuses on all aspects of the science and technology of ultrafine grained (UFG) and nanocrystalline materials. This symposium covers a broad scope, ranging from fundamental science to applications of bulk ultrafine-grained (grain size <1000 nm) and nanostructured (feature size <100 nm) materials. It provides a forum on the topics of fabrication and understanding of UFG and nanocrystalline materials including conventional and emerging technologies and advancements, fundamental issues in severe plastic deformation (SPD) processing and SPD-processed materials, UFG and nanocrystalline microstructure evolution, mechanical and physical properties, deformation mechanisms, superplasticity, joining and bonding, computational and analytical modeling, structural and functional applications, etc. Other emerging topics to be covered include gradient and layered nanostructures, vapor-phase processing, powder processing, rapid-solidification methods, bio-inspired nanomaterials, and radiation tolerant nanomaterials. Also, in honor of the 10th iteration of this symposium, we will hold a “Pioneers of Ultrafine Grained Materials” session that will highlight the contributions of the superheroes of this field. Awards: UFG X will be hosting a Young Scientist Session for students or post-docs within three years of receiving their Ph.D. There will be up to two Gold Medals and three Silver Medals for best oral presentation. Awards will also be given for best poster (One Gold Medal and two Silver Medals). A committee that includes the symposium organizers and invited speakers will decide the awards. Each medalist will receive a certificate, and may receive a cash prize, depending on resources available.