Neutron and Synchrotron Radiation for Materials Research Webinar Series

Neutron and Synchrotron Radiation for Materials Research Webinar Series

Live Events: December 8, 10, 15, and 17, 2020 11 a.m.–12 p.m. ET

Register Now

This webinar series explores some of the latest developments in the 3D characterization of structural materials using neutron and synchrotron radiation. After an opening webinar featuring a roundtable panel discussion with all speakers, the next three webinars encompass individual presentations to allow each of these experts to go into detail on the topics. The topics focus on key examples centered about (a) in-situ neutron and synchrotron diffraction studies, (b) X-ray microscopy studies of grains and defects in 4D, and (c) characterization and modeling of structural materials using synchrotron X-rays.

This webinar series consists of four sessions taking place on December 8, 10, 15, and 17, 2020. Register once for access to all four webinars live or on demand.

What You Will Experience

  • Learn from an expert panel the latest developments of these 3D techniques
  • See specific examples of characterizing structural materials in 3D and 4D (3D + time)
  • Learn the value of applying these techniques to real world materials problems

Your Registration Fee Is Waived

Xnovo Technology ApS

TMS webinars are available at no cost to TMS members. For this webinar, non-members may also register at no cost thanks to Xnovo Technology ApS, who generously provided full sponsorship. Xnovo Technology ApS is the commercial result of more than 20 years of Synchrotron and Diffraction-Imaging research at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). Driven by an urge to make 3D crystallographic X-ray technology accessible for a wider range of materials scientists, Xnovo Technology ApS was founded in December 2012 by Senior Scientist Erik Mejdal Lauridsen, DTU-Energy Conversion, and Professor Henning Friis Poulsen, DTU-Physics. Visit the Xnovo website to learn more about our sponsor.

If you require a certificate of participation for attending this webinar, please email professionaldevelopment@tms.org.

Session 1 - Tuesday, December 8, 2020, 11 a.m.–12 p.m. ET

"Materials Research Panel Talk on Neutron and Synchrotron Radiation"

Moderator

Klaus-Dieter Liss

Klaus-Dieter Liss
Professor, Guangdong Technion–Israel Institute of Technology
Faculty of Engineering & Information Sciences, University of Wollongong

Bio
Klaus-Dieter Liss is a full professor at Guangdong Technion - GTIIT, Shantou, China, and an honorary professor at the University of Wollongong, Australia. Previously he was a senior scientists and research fellow at Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation and a research fellow at Japan Atomic Energy Agency, and a senior scientist at Centre for Materials and Coastal Research (GKSS), Deutsches Elektronen-synchrotron (DESY), and Hamburg University of Technology (TU), Germany. From 1994 to 2001, he was a scientist and beamline responsible at European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in France. From 1986 to 1994, he was a trainee and student at Institut Laue Langevin. Liss has a MSc in Physics from Technical University of Munich and a Ph.D. in Physics from RWTH Aachen, Germany. He is a former branch president of Materials Australia NSW. Liss serves as a member of the TMS Phase Transformations Committee and the TMS Characterization Committee.

Panelists

Matthew P. Miller

Matthew P. Miller
Professor, Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and Associate Director, CHESS
Cornell University

Bio
Matthew P. Miller is a professor in the Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Cornell University. He is also the associate director of the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS). Miller’s research focuses on the microscale experimental characterization of the mechanical behavior of structural materials to build new modeling capabilities for processes such as plasticity, fracture and fatigue and additive manufacturing. Over the past two decades, this work has involved the development and use of high energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction (HEXD) experiments to probe the microstructural and micromechanical evolution of structural materials in real time. In the summer of 2019, Miller became the principal investigator for a $7.1M/year grant with the Air Force Research Laboratory Materials Directorate to establish MSN-C: The Materials Solution Network at CHESS. The mission of MSN-C is to provide experimental design and implementation support for novice AFRL and DoD materials researchers, in general, at the two MSN-C beamlines: SMB, the structural materials beamline, emphasizing HEXD methods and FMB, the functional materials beamline, focused on small and wide angle x-ray scattering (SAXS &WAXS), phase contrast tomography and other lower energy methods employed for understanding the processing and performance of a wide range of “soft” engineering materials.

Henning Friis Poulsen

Henning Friis Poulsen
Professor, Department of Physics
Technical University of Denmark

Bio
Henning Friis Poulsen is a professor in the Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, where he studies x-ray science and the use of advanced x-ray methods within materials science and engineering. He is director of the 3D imaging center at DTU and heads the center-of-excellence SOLID. In collaboration with the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble he has developed several x-ray microscopy techniques enabling 3D movies to be acquired of structural evolution within bulk materials. Poulsen is the receiver of two ERC Advanced grants, has written more than 200 peer-reviewed publications and is the co-founder of three companies.

Session 2: Thursday, December 10, 2020, 11 a.m.–12 p.m. ET

"In-situ Neutron and Synchrotron Diffraction Studies"

Moderator

Henning Friis Poulsen

Henning Friis Poulsen
Professor, Department of Physics
Technical University of Denmark

Speaker

Klaus-Dieter Liss

Klaus-Dieter Liss

Professor, Guangdong Technion–Israel Institute of Technology
Faculty of Engineering & Information Sciences, University of Wollongong

"Metastable Heterogeneous Metals at High Temperature: In-situ Diffraction Studies with Neutrons and Synchrotron Radiation"

Microstructural engineering through thermo-mechanical treatment is the pathway to design metals with enhanced mechanical properties, within or far out of thermodynamic equilibrium. Both neutron and synchrotron X-ray studies have been exploited to obtain microstructural and phase information in-situ and in real time, revealing kinetic processes as recovery, recrystallization and transformation. The presentation reviews their context in lattice parameter evolution, texture rearrangements, order and disorder as well as crystallite arrangements. Examples are selected from steel making, nuclear structural materials, light metals and high-temperature alloys under ambient or processed under extreme conditions. As synchrotron radiation will be covered in other presentations of this TMS webinar series, emphasis will be given on neutrons.

Session 3: Tuesday, December 15, 2020, 11 a.m.–12 p.m. ET

"X-ray Microscopy Studies of Grains and Defects in 4D"

Moderator

Matthew P. Miller

Matthew P. Miller
Professor, Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and Associate Director, CHESS
Cornell University

Speaker

Henning Friis Poulsen

Henning Friis Poulsen

Professor, Department of Physics
Technical University of Denmark

"X-ray Microscopy: 3D Movies of Structural Material on All Length Scales"

The structure of crystalline materials is typically organized hierarchically on several length scales. Hard x-ray microscopy is presented as a collection of modalities that allows to zoom into a mm-sized sample to acquire 3D maps of any embedded region and at essentially all relevant length scales. For coarse mapping of grains, their orientations and average stress state diffraction-based tomography methods can sample thousands of grains with a resolution of 2 μm. At the 100 nm scale, domains and dislocations and their associated strain fields can be visualized by diffraction microscopy. Similar to dark field electron microscopy, diffraction and imaging can be combined in several ways. Hard x-ray microscopy is optimized for acquisition of 3D movies: directly visualizing the structural changes during nucleation and growth, deformation or damage. The state of art is provided along with examples of use. I discuss how hard x-ray microscopy studies can enable the formulation and validation of improved multiscale models that account for the entire heterogeneity of materials.

Session 4: Thursday, December 17, 2020, 11 a.m.–12 p.m. ET

"Characterization and Modeling of Structural Materials Using Synchrotron X-rays"

Moderator

Klaus-Dieter Liss

Klaus-Dieter Liss
Professor, Guangdong Technion–Israel Institute of Technology
Faculty of Engineering & Information Sciences, University of Wollongong

Speaker

Matthew P. Miller

Matthew P. Miller

Professor, Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and Associate Director, CHESS
Cornell University

"Using Synchrotron X-rays to Characterize and Model Structural Materials"

The beams of x-rays produced at a high energy synchrotron light source, coupled with the current generation of highly resolved detectors and sophisticated sample environment and positioning equipment, have enabled the emergence of an entirely new class of x-ray scattering experiments designed specifically for characterizing structural metals. High energy x-ray diffraction (HEXD) experiments have been transformed into materials characterization measurements, thereby shifting the focus from the x-rays and photon science to the materials themselves and their applications in engineering design, including their use in the motivation, calibration and validation of multiscale material models. This talk presents the general principles of some of the more popular HEXD methods for examining metals including the use of in situ loading methods for mimicking processing or performance conditions and the determination of residual stress.