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The Lead-Zinc Component of the 2000 TMS Fall Extractive Meeting



2000 TMS FALL EXTRACTION AND PROCESS METALLURGY MEETING: NEW TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE NEXT MILLENNIUM
Combining Lead-Zinc 2000 and Recycling of Metals and Engineered Materials
October 22-25, 2000 · Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society's (TMS's) 2000 Fall Extraction and Process Metallurgy Meeting: New Technologies for the Next Millennium (Combining Lead-Zinc 2000 and Recycling of Metals and Engineered Materials), will be held at the Pittsburgh Hilton Hotel, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, from October 22-25, 2000. The Pittsburgh Hilton Hotel is located in downtown Pittsburgh, across from historic Fort Pitt. It provides the ideal location for the TMS Fall Extraction and Process Metallurgy Meeting, which combines two of TMS's popular series meetings—Lead-Zinc 2000 and Recycling of Metals and Engineered Materials. The constituent symposia will coorganize sessions related to the recycling of lead and zinc.

LEAD-ZINC 2000

Lead-Zinc 2000 is the fourth decennial symposium organized by TMS that is devoted to the theory and practice of the extractive metallurgy of lead and zinc. Building on the successes of the original 1970 symposium and the subsequent meetings held in 1980 and 1990, Lead-Zinc 2000 will bring together plant operators, engineers and researchers to discuss all aspects of the hydrometallurgical, electrometallurgical and pyrometallurgical processing of these commercially important metals. At the operations level, the intent is to outline benchmarking technologies as well as present plant operations and recent commercial developments. At the research level, the emphasis will be placed on the understanding of existing technologies and the development of new processing concepts. Environmental concerns associated with the processing of both metals will be considered, along with the acceptable disposal of the various slags, residues and bleed streams produced by the industry.



T.R.A. Davey
T.R.A. Davey
Dr. Davey obtained his D.Appl.Sc. degree from the University of Melbourne, Australia. He subsequently worked for BHAS, Port Pirie, Australia, for Norddeutsche Affinerie, Hamburg, Germany, for Imperial Smelting, Avonmouth, England and for the CSIRO Division of Chemical Engineering, Melbourne, Australia. He has also been a professor of metallurgical engineering at the Colorado School of Mines and the University of Melbourne. During his distinguished career, he has consulted for many of the world's leading metals producers and has contributed significantly to the professional administration of the University of Melbourne. In addition to his organization of the first TMS decennial Lead-Zinc meeting, he helped establish the International Hofmann Prize Consortium and served on numerous organizing committees for Australian and international conferences. His many honors include the President's Medal of the AusIMM and the TMS Extractive Metallurgy Division (EMD) Gold Medal Award and was 1988's EMD Lecturer.

LEAD-ZINC 2000 SYMPOSIUM LUNCHEON

The Lead-Zinc 2000 symposium will hold a luncheon to honor Dr. T.R.A. Davey for his many contributions to metallurgical science and the industry throughout his distinguised career. The recongnition of Dr. Davey at the Lead-Zinc 2000 symposium is especailly appropriate as he played a key role in the organization of the first decennial conference and contributed to the 1980 and 1990 meetings.

TOPICS

Lead-Zinc 2000 will emphasize the industrial aspects of the extractive metallurgy of lead and zinc, but will also include key papers dealing with the fundamentals of the production of these metals. In addition, a plenary session will be held on the Monday morning of the symposium to discuss the latest economic factors affecting lead and zinc, new applications for both metals, as well as the environmental challenges facing the Lead and Zinc industry. Sessions are anticipated in the following areas:

In addition, a select number of overview papers will be included on the economic aspects of lead and zinc, as well as new applications for both metals.

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

The final technical program for the meeting is available for download as a portable document format file. For additional technical information, contact . . .

J.E. Dutrizac
CANMET
555 Booth Street, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0G1 CANADA
Telephone (613) 995-4823; Fax (613) 966-9041

ADVANCE MAILER

Available for download as a PDF file (~300kb), which can be viewed using Adobe Acrobat, this brochure presents a wide range of pre-meeting publicity for the sumposium as well as all necessary registration materials.

SHORT COURSES

A one and one-half day short course will be held on Saturday, October 21 and Sunday, October 22, immediately before the actual symposium. The short course will emphasize the fundamental aspects of the extractive metallurgy of lead and zinc, and will complement the presentations given in the symposium itself. In effect, the short course will review the fundamental basis for the technologies now used by the industry and will offer a foundation for the development of new processes. The Short Course will be divided into a Lead Session and a Zinc Session, which will run concurrently. For either option, a 12-h lecture program will be offered. An outline of the Short Course is given below:


Group 1 - Lead Sessions:
Saturday, October 21, 2000

Group 2 - Zinc Sessions:
Saturday, October 21, 2000
8:00-8:30
Registration
8:00-8:30
Same as Lead Session
8:30-8:35
Opening Remarks
A. Gonzalez, Cominco Research, Trail, Canada
8:30-8:35
Same as Lead Session
8:35-10:30
Introduction to Lead and Zinc Processing Flowsheets
A.E. Morris, Thermart, San Diego, USA
8:35-10:30
Same as Lead Session
10:30-10:50
Break
10:30-10:50
Same as Lead Session
10:50-12:00
ISF Technologies, Blast Furnaces and Fire Refining
G.C. Richards, Cominco Resarch, Trail, Canada
10:50-12:00
Roasting of Zinc Feeds
F. Ajersch
12:00-13:00
Lunch
12:00-13:00
Same as Lead Session
13:00-13:50
ISF Technologies, Blast Furnaces and Fire Refining, Continued
G.C. Richards, Cominco Research, Trail, Canada
13:00-13:50
Roasting of Zinc Feeds Continued
F. Ajersch
13:50-14:10
Break
13:50-14:10
Same as Lead Session
14:10-15:10
New Lead Technologies: Kivcet, QSL and Ausmelt
D.Ashman, Cominco Limited, Trail, Canada
14:10-15:30
Zinc Leaching: Conventional Technologies, Pressure Leaching and Atmospheric Leaching
S. Fugleberg, Outokumpu Metallurgical Research Centre, Pori, Finland
15:10-15:30
Break
15:10-15:30
Same as Lead Session
15:30-16:30
New Lead Technologies: Kivcet, QSL and Ausmelt, Continued
D.Ashman, Cominco Limited, Trail, Canada
15:50-17:00
Zinc Leaching: Conventional Technologies, Pressure Leaching and Atmospheric Leaching Continued
S. Fugleberg, Outokumpu Metallurgical Research Centre, Pori, Finland


Sunday, October 22, 2000

Sunday, October 22, 2000
8:00-9:00
Lead Electrolytic Refining
T.J. O'Keefe, University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, USA
8:00-9:45
Zinc Purification: Cake Treatment, Gypsum Removal and Effluent Treatment
G.P. Demopoulos, McGill Universtiy, Montreal, Canada
9:00-9:20
Break
9:45-10:00
Break
9:20-11:00
Recycling of Lead
P.B. Queneau, P.B. Queneau & Associates, Golden, USA
10:00-11:00
Zinc Electrowinning
T.J. O'Keefe, University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, USA
11:00-11:15
Break
11:00-11:15
Same as Lead Session
11:15-12:45
Zinc Recycling
S.E. James, Big River Zinc Company, Sauget, USA
11:15-12:45
Same as Lead Session
12:45-13:00
Closing Remarks and Short Course Evaluation
12:45-13:00
Same as Lead Session
13:00-15:00
Lunch and Presentation of Short Course Certificates
13:00-15:00
Same as Lead Session


Participation is limited and is on a first-registered, first-accepted basis. Each participant will receive a copy of the short course notes, which will be available only at the short course itself. The notes will be an invaluable reference on the fundamentals of the processing of lead and zinc.

Note:The symposium reserves the right to cancel the short course if the registration is inadequate; a full refund will be provided in such circumstances.

ABOUT THE PRESENTERS


Frank Ajersch  
Frank Ajersch Frank Ajersch obtained his B. Eng in Chemical Engineering from McGill University in 1963 and subsequently joined Noranda Research Centre in Pointe Claire, Quebec where he worked on many pyrometallurgical projects such as the development of the Noranda reactor, slag cleaning and oxygen enrichment in smelting operations. He continued his studies at the University of Toronto, Department of Metallurgy and Material Science, receiving a M.A.Sc. in1968 and a Ph.D. in 1971. After a NRC post doctoral fellowship at the University of Grenoble, France in the Laboratoire de thermodynamique et de physique-chimie metallurgique, he took up a teaching position at Ecole Polytechnique in Montreal and is presently chairman of the Materials Engineering Program. His research contributions are varied in the study of non-ferrous pyrometallurgical reactions, reduction and oxydation mechanisms, reaction kinetics and process modeling, in particular, dealing with granular and agglomerated materials, including projects in collaboration with Canadian Electrolytic Zinc Ltd, Noranda Technology Centre, and Cominco Ltd. He has been an active member of ASM International, TMS and the Metallurgical Society of the CIM, participating numerous organizing committees.

Dan Ashman  
Dan Ashman Dan Ashman received his B.A.Sc. in Metallurgical Engineering from the University of British Columbia in 1979. He joined Cominco Ltd as an engineer in their Technical Development department. Then, following a period in Research he returned to Operations, eventually working as Superintendent of the Zinc Pressure Leaching plant. He subsequently returned to Research where he is now Metallurgical Research Manager. During his career Dan has worked on a wide range of hydro and pyro metallurgical processes including zinc roasting, leaching, electrolyte purification and lead smelting. He has been involved in the evaluation of lead and zinc smelting technologies for many years. His work has covered piloting and commercial scale testing of the Kivcet process as well as the design and start-up of this furnace in Trail. He has reviewed a wide range of processes for application in the Trail metallurgical complex including slag fuming, QSL, Ausmelt and Isasmelt.

George P. Demopoulos  
George P. Demopoulos George P. Demopoulos is professor of metallurgical engineering at McGill University where he is teaching and conducting research in the area of process hydrometallurgy. George -a graduate of the Technical University of Athens, Greece- after receiving his M.Sc(1977) and Ph.D(1981) degrees from McGill worked as a Visiting Research Fellow(1982-83) in the Extractive Metallurgy Laboratory of CANMET under the supervision of Gordon Ritcey . He returned to McGill to pursue an academic career in late 1983 rising to the rank of Full Professor in 1994. Over the period 1994-1999 he served as Chair of the Department of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering. During his first sabbatical leave (1992-93) he was Visiting Professor with the Ecole Superieure de Physique et de Chimie of the Universite Pierre et Marie Curie in Paris, France and with the Technische Universiteit Delft in the Netherlands. Over his second sabbatical leave(1999-00) he worked as Visiting Scientist with the Noranda Technology Centre in Pointe-Claire, Quebec. George over the span of his career at McGill had over 30 post-graduate students and post-doctoral fellows trained under his supervision and 6 patents, some 20 consulting reports, and over 100 scientific publications to his credit. His research has ranged from PGM recovery by SX, to pressure leaching investigations (U, Au, Zn) to developing controlled crystallization/precipitation processes (As fixation, clean gypsum production etc)-the latter constitutes presently the most active research activity of his. Over the past several years he has done a lot of research relating to the zinc hydrometallurgical industry that has involved among other things: acid,direct and pressure leaching; SX removal of Fe; precipitation of iron in the form of goethite and hematite; solution purification(Co, Mn); effluent treatment and gypsum crystallization. George has been active member of CIM and TMS and has contributed as co-instructor in a number of short courses. He is this year's recipient of the Sherritt Hydrometallurgy Award.

John E. Dutrizac  
John E. Dutrizac John E. Dutrizac attended the University of Toronto where he received his B.A.Sc. degree in metallurgical engineering in 1963 and his Ph.D. degree in 1967. Upon graduation, he worked for a short time at the Noranda Technology Centre in Pointe Claire, Qubec. In 1968, he joined CANMET as a Research Scientist, and began to study a variety of hydrometallurgical problems. His current research activities are centred on zinc processing with its associated iron precipitation problems, the leaching of sulphide minerals, and the characterization of the anodes and anode slimes encountered in copper electrorefining. These efforts commonly involve the integration of chemical metallurgy with the techniques of applied mineralogy to improve the understanding of the process. Dr. Dutrizac has over two hundred publications in these and in related fields. John Dutrizac is a former Chairman of the Hydrometallurgy Section, and a Past President of the Metallurgical Society of CIM. He has received many international awards, and is a Fellow of the Chemical Institute of Canada and the Canadian Institute of Mining, Metallurgy and Petroleum.

Jose Alberto Gonzalez  
  Jose Alberto Gonzalez received B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in Metallurgy from the University of Mexico (UNAM) in 1984 and 1985 respectively. He then pursued Ph.D. studies at the University of British Columbia (UBC) on the area of Lead electrorefining under the supervision of Dr. Ernest Peters. After completion of his Ph.D. degree he joined Cominco in 1991, where he has been working since then. He is currently Principal Research Scientist and heads the Electrometallurgy section in Cominco Research. Since 1997 he has been on the editorial board of the Hydrometallurgy Journal. In 1994, he became an Adjunct Professor at UBC where he has been involved in the Electrometallurgy and Hydrometallurgy Chair research activities. His research focus on developing energy efficient ways to electrowin Zinc and Copper and on optimisation of the winning and refining of Lead from fluosilicate electrolytes.

Sigmund Fugleberg  
Sigmund Fugleberg Sigmund Fugleberg received his M.Sc. in Chemical Engineering from bo Akademi in Finland 1963. After 5 years at the Finnish Pulp and Paper Research Institute he joined Outokumpu Research Centre in 1967 as a Research Metallurgist in the then newly formed zinc plant project. From the start-up of the zinc plant at Kokkola 1969 he served there for 6 years as a Plant Metallugist, where after he returned to the research centre in Pori. Upon retirement in 1999 he joined again bo Akademi as a Research Scientist. His field has been; and still is, process and project development within hydrometallurgical production of Zn, Ni, Co and Cu. The main activity has been concerned with development of processes for leaching and accompanying solution purification for a variety of raw materials. Participation in planning and commissioning of projects has also been an important field. He is holder of more than 20 patents and is also an author of some publications. 1999 he was granted the Outokumpu Technology Award.

Stephen James  
Stephen James Steve James has worked for over 20 years in the United States zinc industry at three different operating plants. After graduating from the Colorado School of Mines with A B.Sc.. and an M.Sc.. in Metallurgical Engineering, he began his career as a Research Engineer for the St. Joe Minerals Corporation in Monaca, Pennsylvania. Among other activities, Steve served as the key process engineer for a lead hydrometallurgy pilot plant during its successful 2-year operation. After organizing and leading the hydrometallurgy research group for St. Joe Minerals, Steve moved on to serve as a process engineer at the National Zinc Division of St. Joe Resources Co.in Bartlesville, Oklahoma. He served in a variety of operating positions there, eventually becoming production manager for the electrolytic zinc plant under its new owners, Zinc Corporation of America. Zinc production and worker safety improved every year during his tenure as the production manager. In 1991, Steve joined the Big River Zinc Corporation in Sauget, Illinois as the Director of Technology, a role he still fills.

Steve's involvement with zinc recycling comes primarily from the use of zinc secondaries in primary zinc smelters. He has been involved with the design and operation of two different washing circuits to permit the use of secondary oxides in electrolytic zinc plants. Steve also was involved with the development and preliminary design for a process to recover zinc, cadmium, and lead from fumes generated by the Waelz treatment of electric arc furnace dusts. He has served as a consultant to an independent zinc scrap melting operation. Steve works closely with companies throughout the United States locating sources of secondary zinc materials for use in the Big River plant.

Steve is a member of TMS, CIM, the North American Zinc Processors, the Mining History Association and the American Society for Quality. He has been a past chairman of the Lead, Zinc, Tin Committee of TMS. Steve has presented three short courses on zinc recycling, two in conjunction with CIM and one at the Colorado School of Mines.

Arthur E. Morris  
Arthur E. Morris Dr. Morris taught began his career as Assistant Professor of Metallurgical Engineering at the Department of Metallurgical Engineering, University of Missouri - Rolla. He taught and did research at UMR until his retirement as Professor Emeritus in 1994. He has published and presented approximately 50 papers, written 3 articles for encyclopedias, has a patent on direct lead smelting, and has consulted with AMAX, ASARCO, and various law firms on lead smelting. He has developed a number of computer programs for reactor modeling, and given TMS and ISS short courses on thermodynamics and flowsheet modeling. His current interest is the development and application of computer software to process analysis and design.

Thomas J. O'Keefe  
Thomas J. O'Keefe Thomas J. O'Keefe is Curators' Professor Emeritus of Metallurgical Engineering and Senior Research Investigator of the Graduate Center for Materials Research at the University of Missouri-Rolla. He is also Director of the Institute for Chemical and Extractive Metallurgy at the University of Missouri-Rolla. He received a B.S. (1958) and a Ph.D. (1965) in Metallurgical Engineering from the Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy, now the University of Missouri-Rolla. He has been at the University of Missouri-Rolla since 1964 except for 1977-78 when he took a leave to serve as Research Director, Metal Systems Division, at Air Products and Chemicals. His primary areas of research interest are chemical and extractive metallurgy and deposition of coatings with emphasis in electrometallurgical processing. He has been active in teaching, research, and consulting to industry and government in chemical metallurgy, electrolytic processing, materials recycling, and metal films for electronic and high technology applications.

Paul B. Queneau  
Paul B. Queneau Paul B. Queneau earned his B.S. in metallurgical engineering at Cornell University in 1964, and his Ph.D. in metallurgical engineering at the University of Minnesota in 1967. For over 30 years he has developed extractive processes for primary and secondary feedstocks, and participated in plant startups and plant operations to maximize output, yield, and product quality. Paul began his career in copper and molybdenum metallurgy at the Kennecott Copper Research Center in Salt Lake City, followed by 10 years at AMAX R&D Laboratory and 14 years at Hazen Research in Golden, Colorado. Research at AMAX was principally on nickel, cobalt, tungsten, and molybdenum, and at Hazen on broad range of nonferrous metals. His current firm (1997 to date), P.B. Queneau & Associates, focuses on pyrometallurgy and hydrometallurgy for the extraction and recycling of primary and secondary raw materials, resource location and product marketing.

Dr. Queneau, Cornell Tau Beta Pi, is a registered Professional Engineer in Colorado, Past President of the Denver Section, AIME Chapter (87-88), Chairman of the TMS/EPD Copper, Nickel, Cobalt Committee (91-92) , Plenary Speaker at the Wadsworth Hydrometallurgy Symposium (93), General Meeting Chairman for the Third International Recycling Symposium (95), Chairman of the EPD Award Committee (95-96), and Recycling Short Course Organizer (TMS, CIM, CSM and U.S. EPA; (92 to date). Paul is an Adjunct Professor at the Colorado School of Mines, has authored 33 technical papers and holds 26 U.S. patents.

Greg Richards  
Greg Richards Dr. Richards obtained his Ph.D. in Metallurgical Engineering at the University of British Columbia. He subsequently joined the faculty of the department at UBC, teaching thermodynamics, process metallurgy and mass transfer. His research work focussed on the area of non-ferrous pyrometallurgy, including studies of the zinc slag fuming process, lead and copper flash smelting and copper converting. Analysis of these processes was carried out through lab, pilot plant and industrial investigations as well as physical and mathematical modeling. In 1992 he moved to Cominco Research in Trail, B.C. to work on the development of pyrometallurgical processes for the production of lead, zinc and associated metals. This has involved the study of continuous lead drossing, oxygen lead softening, Kivcet flash smelting and zinc concentrate roasting.


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