Phase Transformations Committee

Technical Programming

MS&T24: Materials Science & Technology: Austenite Formation and Decomposition V: A Symposium in Memory of Prof. Mats Hillert: Organized by Kester Clarke; John Agren; Igor Vieira; Amy Clarke; Matthias Militzer; Annika Borgenstam; Daniel Baker; Hatem Zurob

Austenite Formation and Decomposition V (AF&D V) is the 5th international meeting on the decomposition of austenite following seminal meetings in 1962, 1984, 2003, and 2011. The decomposition of austenite is one of the most important solid-state phase transformations in structural metals since it dramatically influences the relationship between the microstructure, properties, and performance of steels. Topics of interest include experimental, theoretical and computational aspects of thermodynamics and kinetics of austenite and phase stability, advanced experimental characterization, austenite decomposition to bainite, martensite, etc., rapid thermal processes, thermomechanical processing, alloying element effects, multiphase microstructures, and property evolution. A special topic of focus for AF&D V is ultra-fast austenite formation.

MS&T24: Materials Science & Technology: Phase Stability of Additively Manufactured Materials in Extreme Environments: Organized by Ashley Paz Y Puente; Dinc Erdeniz; Eric Payton; Matthew Steiner; Gregory Thompson; Janelle Wharry

From high efficiency turbines to heat exchangers to nuclear reactors, additive manufacturing (AM) has captured the attention of design engineers seeking to take advantage of intricate geometries unattainable by conventional materials processing. Likewise, materials engineers have been enthusiastic about the opportunities that AM presents for using alloys that cannot be processed by conventional thermomechanical routes. Novel designs and the manufacturing process present their own challenges. The non-uniform thermal history and non-equilibrium conditions produced during many additive manufacturing processes result in microstructural heterogeneity within a single build and unexpected phases forming as compared to wrought or cast processes. Residual porosity, anisotropic arrangements of defects, and surface roughness could exacerbate degradation in extreme environments. The focus of this symposium is to simultaneously highlight innovative solutions to engineering challenges that have been unlocked by AM while illuminating the limitations of materials in environments featuring complex interactions between chemical, mechanical, and thermal loads. Of interest is comparison of the chemo-mechanical responses of additively manufactured materials to those that have been conventionally processed. The symposium aims to bring together both experimental and computational work to elucidate the unique characteristics that AM-related microstructural inhomogeneity imparts on materials performance under imposed loads outside of the typically recommended ranges for conventional alloys of related composition. Understanding and characterizing the microstructure, both in the as-built and post-processed state, and how it translates to the properties and performance of AM materials under extreme environments is critical for widespread adoption of this technology. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to experimental, computational, or theoretical studies related to phase transformations and microstructural evolution in additively manufactured materials exposed to or intended for extreme environments such as high temperatures, high strain-rates, corrosive agents, irradiation, hydrogen, etc.

MS&T24: Materials Science & Technology: Solid-State Transformations Under Complex Thermal Conditions: Organized by Adriana Eres-Castellanos; Sriram Vijayan; Eric Payton; Sophie Primig

Complex thermal conditions experienced by engineering components used in high temperature structural and energy applications are caused by the combination of thermal cycling, thermal transients and/or thermal gradients. The traditional approach to study solid-state transformations was previously based on ex situ characterization of isothermally treated or continuously cooled samples. However, these studies may not be representative of thermal conditions experienced by components under operating or processing environments. This symposium invites experimental and computational studies that focus on solid-state transformations and microstructure evolution during complex thermal conditions of metallic systems. Topics include but are not limited to: Microstructural evolution under/during - • complex heat treatments during fusion based metal additive manufacturing and welding, • thermal cycling of aerospace and automobile parts, • heat transfer from engines or moving parts, • aerodynamic heating, • thermal cycling and thermal gradients of solder interconnects used in micro-electronic packages, and • complex in reactor thermal conditions of nuclear reactor components.

2024 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Accelerated Discovery and Insertion of Next Generation Structural Materials: Organized by Soumya Nag; Andrew Bobel; Bharat Gwalani; Jonah Klemm-Toole; Antonio Ramirez; Matthew Steiner

Structural stability of aerospace and energy related materials, manufactured by conventional and additive routes, is of great importance to avoid catastrophic failures during operation. Understanding their thermo-mechanical response under extreme pressure, temperature or corrosive conditions would immensely aid in designing alloys, and thereby increasing their lifetimes. This symposium delves into investigations,focused on using high throughput tools for accelerated materials discovery and root cause analyses of fielded and new make parts. The topics of interest to this symposium include, but are not limited to, the following: •ICME tools coupled with multi-scale experimentation to correlate processing history to microstructural hierarchy and ensuing property response •ML-based multi objective optimization models targeted towards more reliable and predictive capabilities with realistic (usually small) experimental data •High throughput experimental approaches for accelerated material-microstructure-property optimizations to facilitate ML. The focus is on structural high temperature and light-weight materials such as refractory alloys, high entropy alloys, Ni- Co- based alloys, high strength titanium alloys, maraging steels and ODS alloys.

2024 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Hume-Rothery Symposium on Alloy Microstructure Science and Engineering: Organized by Long-Qing Chen; Yufeng Zheng; Wei Xiong; Rajarshi Banerjee

This symposium will bring together experts in advanced theory, computation and experimental characterization of microstructural evolution during solid-state phase transformations and plastic deformation in complex multicomponent alloys. The development of modern computational and experimental tools has led to better fundamental insights into pathways and mechanisms of solid-state transformations and deformation. The symposium will survey the current state-of-the-art fundamental understanding of transformation and deformation mechanisms and the intrinsic coupling between the two processes, leading to the development of new alloy design principles and strategies. Since integration between experiment and computation has become a hallmark in alloy microstructure science and engineering, sessions will cover mechanism-based modeling and simulations motivated and informed by experimental characterization and novel alloy microstructure design and engineering guided by computation. The specific topics will include but not be limited to: (1) Phase transformation pathways and deformation mechanisms in complex multicomponent alloy systems such as Ni-/Co-base superalloys, Ti-, Al- and Mg-alloys, HEAs, and shape memory alloys; (2) Phase transformation and deformation in compositionally and/or structurally modulated or graded materials. Presentations in this symposium are by invitation only.

2024 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Materials Processing and Kinetic Phenomena: From Thin Films and Micro/Nano Systems to Advanced Manufacturing: Organized by Hang Yu; Steven Boles; Jihun Oh; Jerrold Floro; Zungsun Choi; Matteo Seita; Changquan Lai

Materials processing plays a key role in a wide variety of critical and emerging technologies, including thin film processing, micro/nano manufacturing, quantum technologies, and additive manufacturing. To go beyond empirical process development and recipe optimization, a critical and in-depth understanding of the processing science and underlying kinetic phenomena is instrumental. This symposium aims to bring together a wealth of researchers and leaders to discuss how materials processing science has been and is being applied to address the pressing needs in thin film processing and micro/nano manufacturing. It also aims to provide a platform to discuss how processing science and kinetics can best benefit emerging fields, such as additive manufacturing. Topics of interests include (i) kinetic phenomena at the micro/nanoscale: e.g., dewetting and pattern formation; (ii) thin film processing: stress/microstructure/phase evolution; (iii) processing science and kinetic phenomena underlying advanced manufacturing; (iv) Integration of AI and data-driven approaches with materials processing science.

2024 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Phase Transformations and Microstructural Evolution: Organized by Ashley Paz Y Puente; Mark Aindow; Tushar Borkar; Adriana Eres-Castellanos; Sriswaroop Dasari; Eric Payton; Sophie Primig; Sriram Vijayan; Le Zhou

Phase transformation is one of the most effective and efficient means to produce desired microstructures in materials for various applications. This symposium is a continuation of a series of annual TMS symposia focusing on phase transformations and microstructural evolution during materials processing or under service conditions. It intends to bring together experimental, theoretical and computational experts to assess the current status of theories of phase transformations and microstructure evolution primarily in the solid states. In addition to fundamental understanding of the mechanisms underlying phase transformations and microstructure evolution, attention will also be given to microstructure engineering using emerging processing/manufacturing techniques to fabricate advanced materials for both structural and functional applications. The topics of choice for this year include, but are not limited to: 1) Phase transformations in steels and ferrous alloys, non-ferrous alloys (such as Ti, Ni, Al, Zr), ceramics, semiconductors and other materials for both structural and functional applications; 2)Phase transformations and microstructure evolution in high-entropy alloys (HEA) 3) Phase transformations under far-from-equilibrium processing conditions or complex thermal histories; 4) Advanced defect engineering technique assisted by phase transformation; 5) Understanding transformation pathways and metastable microstructures in solid phase processing of materials using shear deformation; 6) The application of data science, simulation tools, and advanced characterization techniques (both in-situ and ex-situ) in understanding and discovery of transformation pathway and microstructure signature along it during phase transformations.

2023 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Accelerated Discovery and Insertion of Next Generation Structural Materials: Organized by Soumya Nag; Andrew Bobel; Bharat Gwalani; Jonah Klemm-Toole; Antonio Ramirez; Matthew Steiner

Structural stability of aerospace and energy related materials, manufactured by conventional and additive routes, is of great importance to avoid catastrophic failures during operation. Understanding their thermo-mechanical response under extreme pressure, temperature or corrosive conditions would immensely aid in designing alloys, and thereby increasing their lifetimes. This symposium delves into investigations, focused on using high throughput tools for accelerated materials discovery and root cause analyses of fielded and new make parts. The topics of interest to this symposium include, but are not limited to, the following: •ICME tools coupled with multi-scale experimentation to correlate processing history to microstructural hierarchy and ensuing property response •ML-based multi objective optimization models targeted towards more reliable predictive capabilities with realistic (usually small) experimental data •High throughput experimental approaches for accelerated material-microstructure-property optimizations to facilitate ML. The focus is on structural high temperature and light-weight materials such as refractory alloys, high entropy alloys, Ni- Co- based alloys, high strength titanium alloys, maraging steels and ODS alloys.

2023 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Algorithm Development in Materials Science and Engineering: Organized by Adrian Sabau; Ebrahim Asadi; Enrique Martinez Saez; Garritt Tucker; Hojun Lim; Vimal Ramanuj

As computational methodologies in the materials science and engineering become more mature, it is critical to develop and validate numerical techniques and algorithms that employ ever-expanding computational resources. The algorithms for either physics-based models or data-based models can impact critical materials science areas such as: data acquisition and analysis from microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), state-of-the-art light source facilities, and analysis/extraction of quantitative metrics from numerical simulations of materials behavior. This symposium seeks abstract submissions for developing new algorithms and/or designing new methods for performing computational research in materials science and engineering. One symposium thrust is on implementation on the novel peta/exascale supercomputer architectures for revolutionary improvements in simulation analysis time, power, and capability. Another symposium thrust is for employing widely available state-of-the art cloud and clusters computing systems. Validation studies and uncertainty quantification of computational methodologies are also of interest. Session topics include, but are not limited to: • Advancements that enhance modeling and simulation techniques such as density functional theory, molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo simulation, dislocation dynamics, electronic-excited states, phase-field modeling, CALPHAD, crystal plasticity, and finite element analysis; • Advancements in semi-empirical models and machine learning algorithms for interatomic interactions, microstructure evolution and meso/continuum models; • New techniques for physics-based, multi-scale, multi-physics materials modeling; • Computational methods for analyzing results and development of reduced models from high fidelity simulations data of materials phenomena; • Approaches for data mining, machine learning, image processing, image based microstructure generation, synthetic microstructure generation, high throughput databases, high throughput experiments, surrogate modeling and extracting useful insights from large data sets of numerical and experimental results; • Approaches for improving performance and/or scalability, particularly on new and emerging hardware (e.g., GPUs), and other high-performance computing (HPC) efforts; and • Uncertainty quantification, statistical metrics from image-based synthetic microstructure generation, model comparisons and validation studies related to novel algorithms and/or methods in computational material science.

2023 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Deformation-induced Manipulation of Defect Structures and Hierarchical Microstructures: Organized by Bharat Gwalani; Kester Clarke; Eric Lass; Vahid Tari

Engineering the microstructure and microstructural hierarchy form the basis of the application of metallic materials. A spatial hierarchy ranging from atomic/dislocation to precipitate to grain level can be effective at different scales and help to design high-performing alloys. Deformation processing is widely applied to engineer defect-mediated microstructures. High-stress deformation processes such as high-pressure torsion or high strain processes such as friction stir processing both have been used to modify defect structures often resulting in the microstructural hierarchy. However, in these processes, the mechanical-thermal coupling obscures a deep mechanistic understanding of the microstructural evolution, and the knowledge of how these microstructures influence properties is an active research area. This symposium brings together the various communities working on deformation-induced microstructural modification. Areas of interest include severe plastic deformation, friction stir processing, cold spray, shear processing, grain boundary engineering, persistent metastable structures by solid-phase processing, the influence of deformation on precipitation, microstructural and phase evolution under deformation, distribution of the alloying elements, supersaturation, forced mixing, and the influence of these on the overall microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of these alloys. Both experimental and computational topics are welcome.

2023 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Phase Stability in Extreme Environments: Organized by Andrew Hoffman; Kinga Unocic; Janelle Wharry; Kaila Bertsch; Raul Rebak

Materials development for extreme environments including high temperature turbines and nuclear reactors involves the development of alloys which are resilient against a variety of degradation mechanisms. These degradation mechanisms include oxidation/corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement, precipitation hardening or instabilities, phase decomposition, fatigue, and wear. Traditional structural alloys such as austenitic steels and Ni superalloys, as well as new material systems such as multicomponent alloys or multiple principal element alloys can all suffer from a variety of phase instabilities that are likely to impact long term performance. Understanding material stability in these extreme environments is paramount to enhancing the lifetime of key components. The purpose of this symposium is to create a forum where researchers from across academia, national laboratories, and industry can share insights on recent advancements and the practical impact of phase stability on the performance of material systems. This includes current materials for applications such as light water reactors and power/aviation turbine systems as well as future applications such as fusion reactors and hydrogen power systems. A variety of perspectives from modeling and simulation to predict behavior and lab scale testing to failure analysis of field components will help to create a fuller understanding of mechanisms and impact. Experimental and/or theoretical studies are sought on topics including but not limited to: -Phase separation or decomposition in extreme environments -Radiation induced phase transformations -Deformation induced phase transformations (e.g. deformation induced martensite) -Long term thermal aging -High temperature thermal cycling -Impact of phase stability on hydrogen embrittlement -Impact of phase stability on stress corrosion cracking

2023 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Phase Transformations and Microstructural Evolution: Organized by Ashley Paz y Puente; Mark Aindow; Sriswaroop Dasari; Ramasis Goswami; Megumi Kawasaki; Eric Lass; Joshua Mueller; Eric Payton; Le Zhou

Phase transformation is one of the most effective and efficient means to produce desired microstructures in materials for various applications. This symposium is a continuation of a series of annual TMS symposia focusing on phase transformations and microstructural evolution during materials processing or under service conditions. It intends to bring together experimental, theoretical and computational experts to assess the current status of theories of phase transformations and microstructure evolution primarily in the solid states. In addition to fundamental understanding of the mechanisms underlying phase transformations and microstructure evolution, attention will also be given to microstructure engineering using emerging processing/manufacturing techniques to fabricate advanced materials for both structural and functional applications. The topics of choice for this year include, but are not limited to: 1) Phase transformations in steels and ferrous alloys, non-ferrous alloys (such as Ti, Ni, Al, Zr), ceramics, semiconductors and other materials for both structural and functional applications; 2)Phase transformations and microstructure evolution in high-entropy alloys (HEA) 3) Phase transformations under far-from-equilibrium processing conditions or complex thermal histories; 4) Advanced defect engineering technique assisted by phase transformation; 5) Understanding transformation pathways and metastable microstructures in solid phase processing of materials using shear deformation; 6) The application of data science, simulation tools, and advanced characterization techniques (both in-situ and ex-situ) in understanding and discovery of transformation pathway and microstructure signature along it during phase transformations.

2023 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Quantifying Microstructure Heterogeneity for Qualification of Additively Manufactured Materials: Organized by Sharniece Holland; Eric Payton; Edwin Schwalbach; Joy Gockel; Ashley Paz y Puente; Paul Wilson; Amit Verma; Sriram Vijayan; Jake Benzing

The transient heat transfer conditions encountered in additive manufacturing (AM) result in unusual microstructures and textures that can have different properties from conventional wrought or cast processes. The unique microstructure results from the combination of rapid melting and solidification from the AM process. The directional heat transfer results in strongly textured columnar grains, and this microstructure affects the mechanical properties of the final part. Conventionally processed products have been considered superior compared to AM in many of the most demanding and safety critical engineering applications due to the heterogeneity and orientation dependency of mechanical properties, potential for life-limiting defect content, and qualification challenges. This limits adoption of AM parts where they could otherwise offer an advantage, for example in weight savings or reduction in final machining. Mechanical anisotropy results from the strong crystallographic texture in as-fabricated AM parts, and this anisotropy can be influenced with an optimization of the laser scanning strategy or a post fabrication heat treatment. Because the initial microstructures from AM are different from conventional processes, optimal heat treatment times and temperatures for AM materials can differ from those used in conventional thermomechanical processing. The lack of standardization between machines creates an additional level of complexity. As a result, the qualification of materials from AM would benefit from an accurate digital twin of the process, capable of predicting defect probabilities and local microstructure heterogeneity. This symposium will explore the unique thermal sequence of AM materials and their distinctive microstructures, which affect their performance. Contributions are sought that address microstructure development during AM from experimental and computational perspectives, including but not limited to: - quantitative microstructure characterization - mechanisms of defect formation - correlation of in-situ process monitoring data with microstructure - defect probability predictions - uncertainty quantification - multiphysics simulations, both of the manufacturing process and the effects of microstructure on performance. References [1] Seifi, M., et al. "Progress towards metal AM standardization to support qualification and certification." JOM 69.3 (2017): 439-455. [2] Kok, Y., et al. "Anisotropy and heterogeneity of microstructure and mechanical properties in metal AM: A critical review." Materials & Design 139 (2018): 565-586. [3] Lindgren, L.-E., and A. Lundb�ck. "Approaches in computational welding mechanics applied to AM: Review and outlook." Comptes Rendus M�canique 346.11 (2018): 1033-1042. [4] Gatsos, T., et al. "Review on computational modeling of process– microstructure–property relationships in metal AM." JOM 72.1 (2020): 403-419. [5] Rezaei, A., et al. "Microstructural and mechanical anisotropy of selective laser melted IN718 superalloy at room and high temperatures using small punch test." Materials Characterization 162 (2020): 110200.

2023 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Frontiers of Materials Award Symposium: Intermetallic Alloys at the Edge of Complexity: Structural and Kinetic Aspects: Organized by Ashwin Shahani

Most intermetallic compounds adopt complex and aperiodic structure types, hallmarked by their extremely large unit cells and extensive crystallographic disorder. Quasicrystals are the quintessential example of crystal complexity: they possess long-range positional order but classically forbidden orientational order. Despite their frequent observation in both metallic alloys and soft matter structures in the 40 years since their discovery, little is known about the way in which they emerge from a liquid, amorphous, or crystalline precursor. While multiple kinetic models have been proposed, such models remain unverified due to the prior lack of experimental and computational probes. We now have suitable probes in hand. This symposium will integrate theory, state-of-the-art characterization techniques, and multi-scale modelling approaches in order to achieve a comprehensive picture of the formation and transformation pathways of complex intermetallics. Topics include structure models; surfaces and overlayers; growth and stability; defect generation; and soft matter analogues.

2022 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Algorithm Development in Materials Science and Engineering: Organized by Mohsen Asle Zaeem; Mikhail Mendelev; Garritt Tucker; Ebrahim Asadi; Bryan Wong; Sam Reeve; Enrique Martinez Saez; Adrian Sabau

As computational methodologies in the materials science and engineering become more mature, it is critical to develop, improve, and validate techniques and algorithms that leverage ever-expanding computational resources. These physical-based and data-intensive algorithms can impact areas such as: data acquisition and analysis from sophisticated microscopes and state-of-the-art light source facilities, analysis and extraction of quantitative metrics from numerical simulations of materials behavior, and implementation on novel peta- and exascale computer architectures for revolutionary improvements in simulation analysis time, power, and capability. This symposium solicits abstract submissions from researchers who are developing new algorithms and/or designing new methods for performing computational research in materials science and engineering. Validation studies and uncertainty quantification of computational methodologies are equally of interest. Session topics include, but are not limited to: • Advancements that enhance modeling and simulation techniques such as density functional theory, molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo simulation, dislocation dynamics, electronic-excited states, phase-field modeling, CALPHAD, and finite element analysis; • Advancements in semi-empirical models and machine learning algorithms for interatomic interactions; • New techniques for simulating the complex behavior of materials at different length and time scales; • Computational methods for analyzing results from simulations of materials phenomena; • Approaches for data mining, machine learning, image processing, high throughput databases, high throughput experiments, and extracting useful insights from large data sets of numerical and experimental results; • Approaches for improving performance and/or scalability, particularly on new and emerging hardware (e.g. GPUs), and other high-performance computing (HPC) efforts; and • Uncertainty quantification, model comparisons and validation studies related to novel algorithms and/or methods in computational material science.

2022 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Grain Boundaries and Interfaces: Metastability, Disorder, and Non-Equilibrium Behavior: Organized by Yue Fan; Liang Qi; Jeremy Mason; Garritt Tucker; Pascal Bellon; Mitra Taheri; Eric Homer; Xiaofeng Qian

The interfacial regions separating different grains in polycrystalline materials, while occupying only a small fraction of total volume, largely control the system’s properties, including mechanics, mass/heat transfer, radiation resistance, etc. The misorientation angle has been widely used to describe the structures of grain boundaries (GBs), but only a few types of GBs (i.e., ones with low energy and some special “coincidence number” Σ) are well understood at the current stage. In reality, given the large variety of possible metastable states, the higher disorder levels at interfaces, and their different responses to external stimuli, global equilibrium is rarely achieved in GBs of poly- or nano-crystalline materials. The large scale of non-equilibrium metastable states and the thermodynamics and kinetics therein play decisive roles in determining GB properties and their microstructural evolution. This symposium aims to accelerate the development of new concepts and methodologies to effectively describe GBs. The role of disorder at interfaces, the broad distributions of energies and activation barriers, and their interplay with complex or extreme environments will be subjects of particular focus. Both theoretical (including modeling and simulation) and experimental studies are encouraged. The topics of interest to this symposium include, but are not limited to, the following: • Energetics and activation barriers spectra in materials with high level of disorder (e.g., grain boundaries, amorphous states, etc.) • Non-equilibrium thermodynamics and metastability of grain boundaries • Novel experimental, theoretical, and data-driven techniques for microstructural characterization of interfaces • Relationships between structure (atomic or crystallographic) and grain boundary properties • Interactions between interfaces and extrinsic defects (e.g., dislocations, point defects, impurities, etc.) and their mechanical consequences • Grain boundary kinetics and phase transformations at different external stimuli (e.g., mechanical loading, irradiation, thermal cycling, etc.) • Interfaces beyond grain boundaries, such as crystalline-amorphous interfaces in hierarchical structures, precipitate-matrix interfaces in multi-element alloys, etc.

2022 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Microstructural Templates Consisting of Isostructural Ordered Precipitate / Disordered Matrix Combinations: Microstructural Evolution and Properties: Organized by Rajarshi Banerjee; Eric Lass; Bharat Gwalani; Jonah Klemm-Toole; Jessica Krogstad; Ashley Paz Y Puente; Keith Knipling; Matthew Steiner

The microstructural templates based on a homogeneous distribution of ordered precipitates (for example L12, DO22, or B2) within a solid solution face-centered cubic (FCC) or body-centered cubic (BCC) matrix, are two of the most prevalent templates used in designing multiple alloy systems. Such systems include nickel-base and cobalt-base superalloys, austenitic and ferritic steels, aluminum-base alloys, and more recently high entropy alloys, or complex concentrated alloys. The ordered precipitates in these alloys can be potent strengtheners, both at ambient and at elevated temperatures. This symposium brings together the various communities working on isostructural ordered/disordered precipitate/matrix alloy systems. Areas of interest include: the mechanism of precipitation of the ordered phase within the FCC or BCC solid solution matrix, distribution of the alloying elements between matrix and precipitate, other related phase transformations, and the influence of these on the overall microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of these alloys. Both experimental and computational work on these topics are welcome.

2022 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Phase Transformations and Microstructural Evolution: Organized by Mohsen Asle Zaeem; Ramasis Goswami; Saurabh Puri; Eric Payton; Megumi Kawasaki; Eric Lass

Phase transformation is one of the most effective and efficient means to produce desired microstructures in materials for various applications. This symposium is a continuation of a series of annual TMS symposia focusing on phase transformations and microstructural evolution during materials processing or under service conditions. It intends to bring together experimental, theoretical and computational experts to assess the current status of theories of phase transformations and microstructure evolution primarily in the solid states. In addition to fundamental understanding of the mechanisms underlying phase transformations and microstructure evolution, attention will also be given to microstructure engineering using emerging processing/manufacturing techniques to fabricate advanced materials for both structural and functional applications. The topics of choice for this year include, but are not limited to:  Phase transformations in steels and ferrous alloys, non-ferrous alloys (such as Ti, Ni, Al, Zr), ceramics, semiconductors and other materials for both structural and functional applications;  Phase transformations and microstructure evolution in high-entropy alloys (HEA)  Phase transformations under far-from-equilibrium processing conditions or complex thermal histories;  Advanced defect engineering technique assisted by phase transformation;  Understanding transformation pathways and metastable microstructures in solid phase processing of materials using shear deformation;  The application of data science, simulation tools, and advanced characterization techniques (both in-situ and ex-situ) in understanding and discovery of transformation pathway and microstructure signature along it during phase transformations.

2021 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Additive Manufacturing: Solid-State Phase Transformations and Microstructural Evolution: Organized by Bij-Na Kim; Andrew Wessman; Chantal Sudbrack; Eric Lass; Katerina Christofidou; Peeyush Nandwana; Rajarshi Banerjee; Whitney Poling; Yousub Lee

The growing field of Additive Manufacturing (AM) provides new exciting challenges and opportunities in physical metallurgy. Inherently different to traditional manufacturing processes, in AM, metallic systems undergo various localised phase transformations in fractions of a second during a build. For instance, the layer-by-layer approach gives rise to the so-called intrinsic heat treatment, where earlier layers continuously experience a temperature gradient induced by the melting of subsequent layers. This often results in an inhomogeneous microstructure throughout the build, and in some cases, precipitation can be triggered from early stages. Therefore, there is a need for AM-tailored post-processing conditions. For a wider adoption of the technology in industry, the knowledge on the microstructure needs to be extended to its stability in service, including high load and temperature conditions. Such understanding will provide a solid background in the design of microstructures tailored for the AM process, and bring us a step closer in establishing the materials paradigm for AM. Topic of interest include, but are not limited to: * Microstructural characterisation of AM-processed materials throughout post-processing. * Physical modelling / simulation of phase transformations and microstructural evolution. * Phase transformations and microstructural stability of AM components under extreme conditions. * Effects of powder manufacturing process and recycling on phase stability. * Processing effects on as-built microstructure gradients and texture.

2021 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Algorithm Development in Materials Science and Engineering: Organized by Mohsen Asle Zaeem; Mikhail Mendelev; Bryan Wong; Ebrahim Asadi; Garritt Tucker; Charudatta Phatak; Bryce Meredig

As computational approaches to study the science and engineering of materials become more mature, it is critical to develop, improve, and validate techniques and algorithms that leverage ever-expanding computational resources. These algorithms can impact areas such as: data acquisition and analysis from sophisticated microscopes and state-of-the-art light source facilities, analysis and extraction of quantitative metrics from numerical simulations of materials behavior, and the ability to leverage specific computer architectures for revolutionary improvements in simulation analysis time, power, and capability. This symposium solicits abstract submissions from researchers who are developing new algorithms and/or designing new methods for performing computational research in materials science and engineering. Validation studies and uncertainty quantification of computational methodologies are equally of interest. Session topics include, but are not limited to: - Advancements that enhance modeling and simulation techniques such as density functional theory, molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo simulation, dislocation dynamics, electronic-excited states, phase-field modeling, CALPHAD, and finite element analysis; - Advancements in semi-empirical models and machine learning algorithms for interatomic interactions; - New techniques for simulating the complex behavior of materials at different length and time scales; - Computational methods for analyzing results from simulations of materials phenomena; - Approaches for data mining, machine learning, image processing, high throughput databases, high throughput experiments, and extracting useful insights from large data sets of numerical and experimental results; - Uncertainty quantification, model comparisons and validation studies related to novel algorithms and/or methods in computational material science.

2021 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Continuous Phase Transformations: Organized by Jessica Krogstad; Gregory Thompson; Matthew Steiner; Janelle Wharry

Continuous phase transformations in the solid state are not limited by nucleation barriers, can give rise to complex microstructural configurations and provide opportunities to achieve a sweeping range materials properties if properly controlled. The potential impact of such transformations now encompasses a much broader range of applications and is no longer limited to fundamental studies or very limited alloy classes. For example, short range ordering phenomenon in so called high entropy alloys are providing new insight on localized mechanical deformation behavior, while second order transformations are also central to the development of next generation steels, magnets, energy storage materials, etc. In addition to fundamental understanding of the mechanism underlying continuous phase transformations, attention will also be given to utilization of these unique transformation pathways to develop novel microstructures for advanced structural and functional materials. This symposium aims to provide a forum for discussion of current research efforts aspiring to understand, control and predict the pathways and consequences of continuous phase transformations, which may arise through conventional or emerging processing routes, through state-of-the-art characterization tools (such as in-situ transmission electron microscopy, aberration-corrected scanning/transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography) and computational tools (including DFT, MD, CALPHAD, Phase-Field and Machine Learning).

2021 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Defect and Phase Transformation Pathway Engineering for Desired Microstructures: Organized by Yufeng Zheng; Rongpei Shi; Yipeng Gao; Timofey Frolov; Stoichko Antonov; Jessica Krogstad; Bin Li

Solid–solid phase transformation during thermo-mechanical processing (TMP) is still one of the most effective and efficient means to produce desired microstructures for structural (including orthopedic implant) and functional materials including steels, light metals (e.g. titanium, magnesium and aluminum alloys) and shape memory alloys, to name a few. On the one hand, extended defects such as dislocations and internal interfaces (e.g., stacking faults, grain boundaries and triple junctions, hetero-phase interfaces) have been frequently utilized to direct nucleation and tune the number density, size, shape, orientation and spatial distribution of desired phases and thus mechanical properties. On the other hand, crystalline defects of a specific characteristic (s) generated during TMP could be desired for improving materials properties as well (e.g., grain boundaries with low-index plane demonstrate strong resistance to crack propagation and corrosion in harsh service environment) The symposium aims at providing a forum for discussion of current research efforts that bring together state-of-the-art characterization tools (such as in-situ transmission electron microscopy, aberration-corrected scanning/transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography) and computational tools (including DFT, MD, Phase-Field and Machine Learning) for fundamental understanding of defect-microstructure interactions and the corresponding defect engineering strategies to design new microstructures, both homogeneous and heterogeneous / hierarchical for unprecedented properties.

2021 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Frontiers in Solidification Science VIII: Organized by Damien Tourret; Amy Clarke; Ulrike Hecht; Nana Ofori-Opoku; Melis Serefoglu; Tiberiu Stan

The eighth “Frontiers in Solidification" symposium will provide a forum to present and discuss the latest advances in the field of Solidification Science. The main focus will be on the fundamental aspects of solidification, with the aim of advancing our understanding of how microstructures develop and evolve during solidification experiments or processes. Beyond solidification, contributions that investigate melting phenomena are also encouraged. The widest range of investigation methods are considered, including theory, experiments, characterization, modeling across all relevant length and time scales, as well as data-driven approaches. Contributions will put forward original interpretations, observations of novel phenomena, and/or outstanding challenges from both fundamental and applied perspectives, as well as transfer of fundamental knowledge to practical applications. Contributions that combine novel characterization techniques, challenging property measurements, and computational simulations across scales are especially encouraged. Topics of interest include: • Nucleation • Growth • Melting • Interfaces and boundaries (solid-liquid, solid-solid, stability, anisotropy, kinetics,...) • Pattern formation (cellular, dendritic, eutectic, peritectic,...) • Fluid flow and gravity effect on microstructure formation and evolution • Segregation and defects • In-situ and time-resolved imaging of microstructures • Theory and modeling across all relevant length scales • Emerging processing techniques (e.g. additive manufacturing) • Data-driven methods in solidification science

2021 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Phase Transformations and Microstructural Evolution: Organized by Rongpei Shi; Yipeng Gao; Fadi Abdeljawad; Bharat Gwalani; Qi An; Eric Lass; Huajing Song

Phase transformation is still one of the most effective and efficient means to produce desired microstructures in materials for various applications. This symposium is a continuation of a series of annual TMS symposia focusing on phase transformations and microstructural evolution during materials processing or under service conditions. It intends to bring together experimental, theoretical and computational experts to assess the current status of theories of phase transformations and microstructure evolution primarily in the solid states. In addition to fundamental understanding of the mechanisms underlying phase transformations and microstructure evolution, attention will also be given to microstructure engineering using emerging processing/manufacturing techniques to fabricate advanced materials for both structural and functional applications. The topics of choice for this year include, but are not limited to: 1. Phase transformations in steels and ferrous alloys, non-ferrous alloys (such as Ti, Ni, Al, Zr), ceramics, semiconductors and other materials for both structural and functional applications; 2. Phase transformations and microstructure evolution in high-entropy alloys (HEA); 3. Phase transformations under far-from-equilibrium processing conditions or complex thermal histories; 4. Advanced defect engineering technique assisted by phase transformation; 5. Understanding transformation pathways and metastable microstructures in solid phase processing of materials using shear deformation; 6. The application of data science and advanced characterization techniques (both in-situ and ex-situ) in understanding and discovery of transformation pathway and microstructure signature along it during phase transformations

Materials Science & Technology 2020: Phase Transformations in Additively Manufactured Materials: Organized by Antonio Ramirez; Ashley Paz y Puente; Matthew Steiner; Vijay Vasudevan; Bij-Na Kim; Eric Lass

As the metal Additive Manufacturing (AM) technology evolves and becomes a viable option for actual component production, a better understanding of the fundamentals and particularities associated with phase transformations involving both, liquid and solid, during the printing process, post-processing and service of additive manufactured materials becomes extremely important. The differentiated microstructures associated with AM and their relationship with the materials and components performance can only be fully understood, modeled and engineered if the phase transformations that have been involved on their formation and evolution are adequately understood. Therefore, this symposium will bring together both the phase transformations and additive manufacturing communities to address fundamental and applied aspects of phase transformations on additive manufactured materials. The topics of interest include, but are not limited to: • Solidification and liquation phenomena, including the resultant chemical segregation; • Solid state transformations during the printing, post-processing and service of metallic materials; • Effects of segregation profiles, impurities content and distribution, crystallographic texture, and residual stresses on liquid-solid and solid-solid phase transformations; • Relationships between phase transformations and defect formation during additive manufacturing and the use of fundamental understanding to propose engineering solutions; • Modeling and simulation of phase transformations associated to AM and AM materials; • Interdependence of thermo-mechanical conditions and phase transformations on the microstructural evolution and final materials performance; • The use of conventional and advance phase transformation models on the design and optimization of alloys better suited for different AM processes.

2020 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Algorithm Development in Materials Science and Engineering: Organized by Mohsen Asle Zaeem; Garritt Tucker; Charudatta Phatak; Bryan Wong; Mikhail Mendelev; Bryce Meredig; Ebrahim Asadi; Francesca Tavazza

As computational approaches to study the science and engineering of materials become more mature, it is critical to develop, improve, and validate techniques and algorithms that leverage ever-expanding computational resources. These algorithms can impact areas such as: data acquisition and analysis from sophisticated microscopes and state-of-the-art light source facilities, analysis and extraction of quantitative metrics from numerical simulations of materials behavior, and the ability to leverage specific computer architectures for revolutionary improvements in simulation analysis time, power, and capability. This symposium solicits abstract submissions from researchers who are developing new algorithms and/or designing new methods for performing computational research in materials science and engineering. Validation studies and uncertainty quantification of computational methodologies are equally of interest. Session topics include, but are not limited to: - Advancements that enhance modeling and simulation techniques such as density functional theory, molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo simulation, dislocation dynamics, electronic-excited states, phase-field modeling, CALPHAD, and finite element analysis; - Advancements in semi-empirical models and machine learning algorithms for interatomic interactions; - New techniques for simulating the complex behavior of materials at different length and time scales; - Computational methods for analyzing results from simulations of materials phenomena; - Approaches for data mining, machine learning, image processing, high throughput databases, high throughput experiments, and extracting useful insights from large data sets of numerical and experimental results; - Uncertainty quantification, model comparisons and validation studies related to novel algorithms and/or methods in computational material science.

2020 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Atom Probe Tomography for Advanced Characterization of Metals, Minerals and Materials III: Organized by Haiming Wen; David Seidman; Keith Knipling; Gregory Thompson; Simon Ringer; Arun Devaraj; Gang Sha

Atom probe tomography (APT), is an emergent characterization technique that is capable of determining the chemical identity of each individual atom and generating 3D chemical maps imaging the distribution of individual atoms. The technique offers high spatial resolution (better than 0.3 nm achievable in all directions) and high analytical sensitivity (as good as 7 appm). APT provides information on elemental composition of the specimen, 3D visualization of distribution of atoms, composition of phases, morphology and size of precipitates, and solute distribution across interfaces, at grain boundaries and along dislocations. In many APT analyses, crystallographic information has been retained within the data, with the potential to directly relate the composition of specific microstructural features to their crystallography with unprecedented sensitivity and resolution. APT can be utilized in many different fields for advanced imaging and analysis of metals, minerals and materials, despite some limitations. This symposium is designed to bring together scientists, engineers and technicians from across disciplines to discuss the technique of APT, its applications and limitations. The symposium will encompass research and applications spanning a wide variety of topics. Presentations on experimental, theoretical, and modeling research are solicited. Topics for this symposium include, but are not limited to:  Applications of APT in advanced characterization of metals, minerals and materials  3D reconstruction and data analysis  Impact of specimen and instrument parameters and optimization of acquisition conditions  Specimen preparation techniques  Limitations of APT  Progress in APT technique  Correlative techniques  Modelling and simulation

2020 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Metastable Phases and Phase Equilibria: Towards Designing the Next Generation of Alloys: Organized by Bij-Na Kim; Rajarshi Banerjee; Gregory Thompson; Eric Lass; Mohsen Asle Zaeem; Mark Aindow; Peeyush Nandwana; Dinc Erdeniz; Andrew Bobel

The demand for materials meeting higher requirements has driven the development of novel alloys over the past decades. Some of the examples include metastable austenite in TRIP, TWIP and Q&P steels, beta-stabilised titanium alloys, gamma double prime precipitates in nickel superalloys, high entropy alloys,quasicrystals, and spinodal decomposition during ageing of aluminium alloys. The foundation of all these technological leaps is in the design and control of metastable phases, where, outstanding properties are achieved through a combination of carefully tailored chemical composition and thermal processing. The symposium aims at providing a forum for discussion towards designing the next generation of alloys.

2020 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Microstructural Template Consisting of a Face-Centered Cubic Matrix with Ordered Precipitates: Microstructural Evolution and Properties: Organized by Rajarshi Banerjee; Eric Lass; Ashley Paz Y Puente; Tushar Borkar; Keith Knipling; Sophie Primig

The microstructural template based on a homogeneous distribution of ordered precipitates (such as L12 or DO22) within a face-centered cubic (FCC) matrix, is one of the most prevalent templates used in multiple alloy systems including nickel-base and cobalt-base superalloys, austenitic steels, aluminum-base alloys, and more recently in high entropy alloys, or complex concentrated alloys. These ordered precipitates have been established to be potent strengtheners, both at room and at elevated temperatures, in case of these alloy systems. The present symposium is an attempt to bring together the different communities working on these alloy systems under one umbrella. The areas of interest include, the mechanism of precipitation of the ordered phase within the FCC solid solution matrix, distribution of the alloying elements between matrix and precipitate, other related phase transformations, and the influence of these on the overall microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of these alloys. Both experimental and computational work on these topics are welcome. We strongly encourage researchers working in this field, but often on different alloy systems, to participate in this unique symposium.

2020 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Phase Transformations and Microstructural Evolution: Organized by Yufeng Zheng; Rongpei Shi; Stoichko Antonov; Yipeng Gao; Rajarshi Banerjee; Yongmei Jin

Phase transformation is still one of the most effective and efficient means to produce desired microstructures in materials for various applications. This symposium is a continuation in a series of annual TMS symposia focusing on phase transformations and microstructural evolution in materials during processing and in service. It intends to bring together experimental, theoretical and computational experts to assess the current status of theories of phase transformations and microstructure evolution primarily in the solid states. In addition to fundamental understanding of the mechanisms underlying phase transformations and microstructure evolution; attention will also be given to the utilization of unique transformation pathways to develop novel microstructures for advanced structural and functional materials. The topics of choice for this year include, but are not limited to: - Phase transformations in steels and ferrous alloys, non-ferrous alloys, ceramics, and other materials - Phase transformations under far-from-equilibrium-condition processing or complex thermal histories - Control phase transitions via defect engineering - Materials defects induced by phase transformation - Computation, data science and experimentation in the understanding of phase transformations