Corrosion and Environmental Effects Committee

Technical Programming

MS&T22: Materials Science & Technology: Resisting Degradation from the Environment: A Symposium Honoring Carolyn M. Hansson’s Research and Pioneering Experiences as a Woman in STEM: Organized by Jenifer Locke; Brendy Rincon Troconis; Ashley Paz y Puente; George Gray; Suveen Mathaudhu; David Shifler

Carolyn M Hansson is a Professor at the University of Waterloo in the department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering and cross-appointed to the department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. In 2021, she will be celebrating her 80th birthday. The technical scope of this symposium are topics that intersect with one or more of her areas of expertise. While her focus has been primarily with concrete and steels, for the purposes of this symposium we will include all materials for greater inclusivity. The topics of interest include corrosion, erosion, and wear of materials; durability of construction materials; corrosion and electrochemical techniques; techniques for measuring the amount of degradation; rust-resistant reinforcing materials; sustainable materials; cement and concrete; and materials to maintain the integrity of structures. Carolyn Hansson was the first female student to attend the Royal School of Mines at Imperial College, London, and the first woman to graduate with a PhD in metallurgy from the same. She is Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Engineering, Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, Fellow of the American Concrete Institute, Fellow of the Minerals, Metals and Materials Society (US), and Fellow of the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining (UK). Professor Hansson is the Associate Editor for Cement and Concrete Research and a member of the Executive Committee of the Board of Governors of Acta Materialia. A key feature of this symposium will be a 45 minute Fireside Chat with Carolyn Hansson. There will be two people asking questions (one of which is a budding metallurgist and corrosion expert). The key aspect to this part will be to hear Carolyn's story. Specifically, what her career path was like, what advice she has for young people (particularly those that are underrepresented) in moving forward in a research and academic career, and what she is excited about in the future research in her field. After the Fireside chat, short talks that align with poster presentations will occur. Contributed talks will be 5 minutes (3 slides max) in duration to introduce the author’s poster. Invited talks will be 10 minutes (6 slides max) to discuss the impact of Dr. Hansson and/or the impact of her research on your career and may include an introduction to your poster (poster presentation along with the invited talks are encouraged for this symposium). The goal of the above is to avoid the typical symposium style and encourage a deeper level of interaction and networking. Immediately following the 5 and 10 minute introductory talks, all authors will move to their poster and all in attendance will mingle to discuss in detail the work highlighted in the short talks. The Poster Session will be held in the symposium room immediately following the Fireside Chat and Invited/Contributed Talks. The Poster Session will be an interactive/networking component.

2022 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Environmental Degradation of Additively Manufactured Alloys: Organized by Kinga Unocic; Jenifer Locke; Sebastien Dryepondt; Xiaoyuan Lou; Elizabeth Trillo; Andrew Hoffman; Brendy Rincon Troconis

Over the past 10 years, Additive Manufacturing (AM) has grown and expended throughout different areas of application. A lot of effort has been focused on the processing parameters and powder quality to improve the mechanical properties of additive manufactured materials. These materials often possess significant differences in microstructure as compared with more traditionally produced materials. Given these microstructural differences, evaluation of environmental degradation of additively-produced materials is essential for the prediction of performance and life in harsh environments. Additively processed structural materials could potentially be used in aviation, space, marine and industrial applications. This symposium welcomes contributions that will foster discussion on how additively produced materials degrade in: - corrosive environments - stress corrosion cracking - high temperature, oxidizing environments - harsh envrionments while under mechanical stress - high radiation environments This symposium is sponsored by the Corrosion and Environmental Effects committee of TMS and co-sponsored by Additive Manufactured Committee of TMS. Keywords: Environmental degradation, additive manufacturing, corrosion, oxidation, high temperature structural alloys, internal oxidation, stresses, mass loss, oxide scale, water vapor, characterization, environment, radiation, stress corrosion cracking, aquaious corrosion

2022 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Environmental Degradation of Multiple Principal Component Materials: Organized by Wenjun Cai; ShinYoung Kang; XiaoXiang Yu; Vilupanur Ravi; Christopher Weinberger; Elizabeth Opila; Bai Cui; Mark Weaver; Bronislava Gorr; Srujan Rokkam

Multiple principal component materials seek to utilize configurational entropy to stabilize disordered solid solution phases. The most well-known materials in this novel class include multi-principal element alloys and high-entropy ceramics. The numerous combinations of constituents in such materials represent a huge but under-explored chemical space and offer considerable freedom in the material design. Among a wide range of material properties observed based on the compositions selected and microstructures developed, some high-entropy materials' exceptional degradation resistance shows potential applications in severe and extreme environments, while other high-entropy materials exhibit reduced environmental durability. This variation in behavior demonstrates that gaps in knowledge still exist regarding each element's individual functions and combined elements' effects on reactivity. One can expect more complex processes to occur in the multicomponent systems, including selective oxidation and dissolution of various elements, possible nonstoichiometry and nonequilibrium oxides formation, and the synergies between materials and the environments. For these reasons, the current models lack the capabilities to fully understand and predict degradation processes in multi principal component materials. This symposium will provide a platform to discuss and present recent experimental investigations on environmental degradation behavior, novel characterization methods development, and advanced theoretical modeling and computational simulation. Themes of interest include, but not limited to: (1) Aqueous and high temperature corrosion, oxidation, and electrochemistry studies of multicomponent materials such as high entropy alloys, ceramics, and intermetallic compounds under various corrosive environments (2) Thermodynamics and kinetics of formation and growth of secondary phases including oxide and phase separation in multi-principal elements alloys and high-entropy ceramics (3) Interaction of mechanical stresses and corrosive environments, such as stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatigue, and tribocorrosion (4) Interaction of ion irradiation and corrosive environments, such as irradiation affected corrosion and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (5) Hydrogen pick-up and embrittlement (6) In situ and ex situ electrochemical analysis of oxidation and corrosion kinetics (7) Advanced characterization on the structure and composition of oxidation and corrosion products (8) Multiscale modeling and computational simulation, including density functional theory, molecular dynamics, kinetic Monte Carlo, CALPHAD, and phase-field methods (9) High-throughput materials design, synthesis, tests, and characterization (10) Database and machine learning model developments in high-entropy alloys and ceramics design

2022 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Environmentally Assisted Cracking: Theory and Practice: Organized by Bai Cui; Raul Rebak; Srujan Rokkam; Jenifer Locke

Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) is a significant limit for the lifetime of material components in harsh environments in many fields, such as the oil and natural gas industry, advanced nuclear power plants, and navy applications. EAC can occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, composites, and may be a potential problem in recently developed materials such as additively manufactured materials, high entropy alloys (multi-principal element alloys), etc. The purpose of this symposium is to provide an international forum to foster the discussion of the critical problems in EAC and recent advances in both experiments and simulations. This symposium seeks technical presentations related to experimental and modeling studies of various types of EAC, such as hydrogen embrittlement, stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatigue, and liquid metal embrittlement. The symposium will encompass, but not limited to, the following themes: • Experimental methods for the performance test of EAC in the laboratory and real environments; • Development of physics-based approaches for EAC monitoring and prognostics; • Multiscale models to understand EAC mechanisms and predict the lifetime of structural materials in harsh environments; • Stress corrosion cracking of alloys in high-temperature water, seawater, or other environment; • Fracture and fatigue of alloys in hydrogen environment; • Degradation of materials in liquid metal environment.

2022 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Materials and Chemistry for Molten Salt Systems: Organized by Stephen Raiman; Raluca Scarlat; Jinsuo Zhang; Kumar Sridharan; Nathaniel Hoyt; Michael Short

The use of molten salts as a coolant in molten salt reactors (MSR) and concentrating solar power (CSP) systems offers many advantages including low operating pressures, high temperatures, and favorable heat transfer. Molten salts are also widely used in the metal processing and nuclear fuels reprocessing industries. Despite the advantages, the highly aggressive molten salts present a challenging environment for salt facing materials. This symposium covers all aspects of materials science, chemistry, and electrochemistry in molten salt systems for diverse purposes such as energy transfer, energy storage, metallurgical processing, and actinide recovery. Abstracts are solicited in, but not limited to, the following topics: Corrosion of salt-facing materials Salt effects in graphite and moderator materials Fission product embrittlement Alloy selection and design for molten salt applications Interaction of fission products with materials Mechanical and creep properties Electrochemistry for metal processing and actinide recovery Salt chemistry effects on materials including radiolysis Heat exchanger design Welding and cladding issues Waste handling and actinide recovery Electrochemistry for salt property evaluation

2022 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Seeing is Believing -- Understanding Environmental Degradation and Mechanical Response Using Advanced Characterization Techniques: An SMD Symposium in Honor of Ian M. Robertson: Organized by Kaila Bertsch; Khalid Hattar; Josh Kacher; Bai Cui; Benjamin Eftink; Stephen House; May Martin; Kelly Nygren; Blythe Clark; Shuai Wang

Since his arrival in the United States in 1982 with a Doctor of Metallurgy from the University of Oxford, Ian M. Robertson has advanced our physical understanding of materials response under extreme conditions, including gaseous hydrogen atmospheres, corrosive environments, high stress/strain rates, and exposure to radiation. Over forty years of research at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and Wisconsin-Madison, he has pioneered a range of in situ TEM techniques in the areas of environmental TEM, thermomechanical testing, and MEMS-based quantitative mechanical testing, as well as advanced focused ion beam (FIB)-based sample preparation. These techniques were developed with the goal of elucidating the basic physical mechanisms governing plasticity, material degradation, and failure processes. The contributions from his lab permitted the development, refinement, and validation of many theories and theoretical models, most notably the Hydrogen-Enhanced Localized Plasticity (HELP) mechanism for hydrogen embrittlement and determining the criteria for dislocation-grain boundary interactions. His research coupling TEM with advanced theory and simulation has shaped the current state-of-the-art in multiple fields and continues to be applied to increasingly complex materials and environments. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: - Development of advanced in situ TEM techniques - Analysis of late-stage plasticity near crack tips and fracture surfaces - Understanding hydrogen embrittlement mechanisms - Exploring the fundamentals of stress corrosion cracking - Investigating dislocation-interface interactions - Quantifying the stability of materials to irradiation damage This symposium was rescheduled from the TMS 2021 Virtual Annual Meeting & Exhibition.

2021 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Coatings and Surface Engineering for Environmental Protection III: Organized by Arif Mubarok; Tushar Borkar; Rajeev Gupta; Mary Lyn Lim; Raul Rebak; Brian Okerberg

This symposium will cover the followings: a) Evaluation of corrosion performance. Variations in test results between cabinet testing vs. outdoor testing. b) Development of corrosion inhibiting coatings. c) Fundamental understanding of corrosion protection mechanism. d) Analytical tools used to characterize corrosion mechanisms. e) Challenges to control corrosion under insulation (CUI).

2021 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Corrosion in Heavy Liquid Metals for Energy Systems: Organized by Osman Anderoglu; Alessandro Marino; Michael Short; Peter Hosemann; Mike Ickes

Heavy liquid metals (HLMs) such as molten Pb and lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) are being proposed as heat transport fluids in advanced nuclear and concentrated solar power systems due to their low vapor pressure, excellent thermophysical (high boiling point and thermal conductivity) and neutronic properties, and thermal energy storage potential. Furthermore, liquid metals such as Zn, Sn and its alloys are used in other industry applications such as automotive and next generation of semiconductors (e.g. extreme ultraviolet lithography). Due to interest in this technology for a variety of industrial applications, a symposium on heavy liquid metals (HLMs) including Pb, Bi, Zn, Sn, Sb, LBE and their compatibility with structural or functional materials is proposed. While the main focus is on materials issues such as corrosion and liquid/solid metal embrittlement, it is also essential to cover technological aspects of the use of liquid metals including chemistry control methods, filtering, in situ characterization techniques, forced and natural convection methods, and flow rate measurements. Furthermore, we intend to provide a platform to highlight recent advances in electrochemical measurements in liquid metals such as Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) or similar techniques. Abstracts are solicited in the following topics: - HLM compatibility with structural materials including corrosion, erosion, and embrittlement - Solidification of HLM materials - Active HLM chemistry control and measurement techniques - Advanced numerical techniques for modeling coolant chemistry in liquid metals - Innovative instrumentation including flow rate and temperature measurements - In situ characterization including mechanical properties, corrosion, electrochemical methods, and spectroscopy methods - Integrated HLM experimentation including simultaneous effects of temperature, flow, impurities, radiation, and/or strain of materials exposed to HLMs - Radioisotope retention in molten Pb/LBE - HLM compatibility with non-metals (e.g. nuclear fuel, MAX phase materials, CerMets) - Joining and welding of components exposed to HLMs

2021 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Environmental Degradation of Additively Manufactured Alloys: Organized by Kinga Unocic; Jenifer Locke; Sebastien Dryepondt; Michael Kirka; Xiaoyuan Lou; Brendy Rincon Troconis; Luke Brewer

Over the past 10 years, Additive Manufacturing (AM) has grown and expanded throughout different areas of application. A lot of effort has been focused on the processing parameters and powder quality to improve the mechanical properties of additive manufactured materials. These materials often possess significant differences in microstructure as compared with more traditionally produced materials. Given these microstructural differences, evaluation of environmental degradation of additively-produced materials is essential for the prediction of performance and life in harsh environments. Additively processed structural materials could potentially be used in aviation, space, marine and industrial applications. This symposium welcomes contributions that will foster discussion on how additively produced materials degrade in: - corrosive environments - high temperature, oxidizing environments - harsh environments while under mechanical stress - high radiation environments

2021 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Environmentally Assisted Cracking: Theory and Practice: Organized by Bai Cui; Raul Rebak; Srujan Rokkam; Jenifer Locke

Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) is a significant limit for the lifetime of material components in harsh environments in many fields, such as the oil and natural gas industry, advanced nuclear power plants, and navy applications. EAC can occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, composites, and may be a potential problem in recently developed materials such as additively manufactured materials, high entropy alloys (multi-principal element alloys), etc. The purpose of this symposium is to provide an international forum to foster the discussion of the critical problems in EAC and recent advances in both experiments and simulations. This symposium seeks technical presentations related to experimental and modeling studies of various types of EAC, such as hydrogen embrittlement, stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatigue, and liquid metal embrittlement. The symposium will encompass, but not limited to, the following themes: • Experimental methods for the performance test of EAC in the laboratory and real environments; • Development of physics-based approaches for EAC monitoring and prognostics; • Multiscale models to understand EAC mechanisms and predict the lifetime of structural materials in harsh environments; • Stress corrosion cracking of alloys in high-temperature water, seawater, or other environment; • Fracture and fatigue of alloys in hydrogen environment; • Degradation of materials in liquid metal environment.

2021 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Materials and Chemistry for Molten Salt Systems: Organized by Stephen Raiman; Kumar Sridharan; Nathaniel Hoyt; Jinsuo Zhang; Michael Short; Raluca Scarlat

The use of molten salts for molten salt reactors (MSR), concentrating solar power (CSP) systems, and energy storage offers many advantages including low operating pressures, high temperatures, and favorable heat transfer. Despite the advantages, the highly aggressive molten salts present a challenging environment for salt facing materials. Further, the high temperatures presented by these systems require exceptional mechanical properties. This symposium covers all aspects of materials science, chemistry, and electrochemistry in molten salt systems for heat transfer and energy storage. Abstracts are solicited in the following topics: • Corrosion of salt-facing materials • Salt effects in graphite and moderator materials • Fission product embrittlement • Alloy selection and design for molten salt applications • Interaction of fission products with materials • Mechanical and creep properties • Electrochemistry for corrosion analysis • Salt chemistry effects on materials including radiolysis • Heat exchanger design • Welding and cladding issues • Electrochemistry for salt property evaluation

2020 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Advancing Current and State-of-the-Art Application of Ni- and Co-based Superalloys: Organized by Chantal Sudbrack; Mario Bochiechio; Kevin Bockenstedt; Katerina Christofidou; James Coakley; Martin Detrois; Laura Dial; Bij-Na Kim; Victoria Miller; Kinga Unocic

Superalloys are critical to operation and future design of a wide variety of propulsion and power generation components in the aerospace, marine, and energy industries. Their industrial application is often driven by excellent long-term stability and durability at elevated temperatures or in aggressive environments because they display a good balance of mechanical strength, fatigue and creep resistance, as well as corrosion and oxidation resistance. The symposium aims to attract papers on current and state-of-art application of Ni- and Co-based superalloys. Topics of interest may include (but are not limited to): • Viability of fabrication with additive manufacturing methods (powder bed techniques and direct energy deposition) • Relationships of metallurgical processing with microstructure and performance (i.e. casting, forging and heat treatment) • Mechanisms of ambient and elevated temperature plasticity, creep, fatigue, creep-fatigue, crack growth and environmental damage • Mitigation of environmental, thermal, and thermal mechanical damage, including improved coatings for service operation • Advancement in joining, repair, and rejuvenation of superalloys

2020 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Coatings and Surface Engineering for Environmental Protection II: Organized by Arif Mubarok; Raul Rebak; Rajeev Gupta; Tushar Borkar; Brian Okerberg; Michael Mayo

This symposium will cover the followings: a) Evaluation of corrosion performance. Variations in test results between cabinet testing vs out-door testing. b) Development of corrosion inhibiting coatings. c) Fundamental understanding of corrosion mechanism. d) Analytical tools used to characterize corrosion mechanisms. e) Challenges to control corrosion under insulation.

2020 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Environmental Degradation of Additively Manufactured Alloys: Organized by Kinga Unocic; Luke Brewer; Sebastien Dryepondt; Michael Kirka; Jenifer Locke; Xiaoyuan Lou

Over the past 10 years, Additive Manufacturing (AM) has grown and expended throughout different areas of application. A lot of effort has been focused on the processing parameters and powder quality to improve the mechanical properties of additive manufactured materials. These materials often possess significant differences in microstructure as compared with more traditionally produced materials. Given these microstructural differences, evaluation of environmental degradation of additively-produced materials is essential for the prediction of performance and life in harsh environments. Additively processed structural materials could potentially be used in aviation, space, marine and industrial applications. This symposium welcomes contributions that will foster discussion of how additively produced materials degrade in: - corrosive environments - high temperature, oxidizing environments - harsh environments while under mechanical stress - high radiation environments - This symposium is sponsored by the Corrosion and Environmental Effects committee of TMS and co-sponsored by Additive Manufactured Committee of TMS. Keywords: Environmental degradation, additive manufacturing, hot-temperature corrosion, oxidation, high temperature structural alloys, internal oxidation, stresses, mass loss, oxide scale, water vapor, characterization, environment

2020 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Environmentally Assisted Cracking: Theory and Practice: Organized by Bai Cui; Raul Rebak; Srujan Rokkam; Jenifer Locke

Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) is a significant limit for the lifetime of material components in harsh environments in many fields, such as the oil and natural gas industry, advanced nuclear power plants, and navy applications. EAC can occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, composites, and may be a potential problem in recently developed materials such as additively manufactured materials, high entropy alloys (multi-principal element alloys), etc. The purpose of this symposium is to provide an international forum to foster the discussion of the critical problems in EAC and recent advances in both experiments and simulations. This symposium seeks technical presentations related to experimental and modeling studies of various types of EAC, such as hydrogen embrittlement, stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatigue, and liquid metal embrittlement. The symposium will encompass, but not limited to, the following themes: • Experimental methods for the performance test of EAC in the laboratory and real environments; • Development of physics-based approaches for EAC monitoring and prognostics; • Multiscale models to understand EAC mechanisms and predict the lifetime of structural materials in harsh environments; • Stress corrosion cracking of alloys in high-temperature water, seawater, or other environment; • Fracture and fatigue of alloys in hydrogen environment; • Degradation of materials in liquid metal environment; • EAC in additively manufactured materials and high-entropy alloys.

2020 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Materials and Chemistry for Molten Salt Systems: Organized by Stephen Raiman; Jinsuo Zhang; Michael Short; Kumar Sridharan; Nathaniel Hoyt

The use of molten salts as a coolant in molten salt reactors (MSR) and concentrating solar power (CSP) systems offers many advantages including low operating pressures, high temperatures, and favorable heat transfer. Molten salts are also widely used in the metal processing and nuclear fuels reprocessing industries. Despite the advantages, the highly aggressive molten salts present a challenging environment for salt facing materials. Further, the high temperatures presented by these systems require exceptional mechanical properties. This symposium covers all aspects of materials science, chemistry, and electrochemistry in molten salt systems for diverse purposes such as energy transfer, energy storage, metallurgical processing, and actinide recovery. Abstracts are solicited in the following topics: Corrosion of salt-facing materials Salt effects in graphite and moderator materials Fission product embrittlement Alloy selection and design for molten salt applications Interaction of fission products with materials Mechanical and creep properties Electrochemistry for metal processing and actinide recovery Salt chemistry effects on materials including radiolysis Heat exchanger design Welding and cladding issues Waste handling and actinide recovery Electrochemistry for salt property evaluation

2019 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Environmentally Assisted Cracking: Theory and Practice: Organized by Bai Cui; Raul Rebak; Srujan Rokkam

Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) is a significant limit for the lifetime of material components in harsh environments in many fields, such as the oil and natural gas industry, advanced nuclear power plants, and navy applications. EAC can occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, composites, and may be a potential problem in recently developed materials such as additively manufactured materials, high entropy alloys (multi-principal element alloys), etc. The purpose of this symposium is to provide an international forum to foster the discussion of the critical problems in EAC and recent advances in both experiments and simulations. This symposium seeks technical presentations related to experimental and modeling studies of various types of EAC, such as hydrogen embrittlement, stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatigue, and liquid metal embrittlement. The symposium will encompass, but not limited to, the following themes: • Experimental methods for the performance test of EAC in the laboratory and real environments; • Development of physics-based approaches for EAC monitoring and prognostics; • Multiscale models to understand EAC mechanisms and predict the lifetime of structural materials in harsh environments; • Stress corrosion cracking of alloys in high-temperature water, seawater, or other environment; • Fracture and fatigue of alloys in hydrogen environment; • Degradation of materials in liquid metal environment; • EAC in additively manufactured materials and high-entropy alloys.

2019 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Materials for Molten Salt Energy Systems: Organized by Stephen Raiman; Jinsuo Zhang; Kumar Sridharan; Judith Vidal; Michael Short

The use of molten salts as a coolant in molten salt reactors (MSR) offers many advantages including low operating pressures, high temperatures, and favorable heat transfer. For concentrating solar power systems (CSP), the use of molten salts as a heat transfer medium enables efficient thermal energy storage. Despite the advantages, the highly aggressive molten salts present a challenging environment for salt facing materials. Further, the high temperatures presented by these systems require exceptional mechanical properties. This symposium covers structural and moderator materials in molten salt for nuclear power and concentrating solar power. Abstracts are solicited in the following topics: - Corrosion of salt-facing materials - Salt effects in graphite and moderator materials - Fission product embrittlement - Alloy selection and design for molten salt applications - Interaction of fission products with materials - Mechanical and creep properties - Salt chemistry effects on materials including radiolysis - Heat exchanger design - Welding and cladding issues - Waste handling and actinide recovery

2018 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Environmentally Assisted Cracking: Theory and Practice: Organized by Bai Cui; Raul Rebak; Sebastien Dryepondt; Srujan Rokkam

Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) has become a significant limit for the lifetime of structural material components in harsh environments in many fields, such as the oil and natural gas industry, advanced nuclear power plants, and navy applications. The purpose of this symposium is to provide an international forum to foster the discussion of the critical problems in EAC and recent advances in both experiments and modelling. This symposium seeks technical presentations related to experimental and/or modeling studies of various types of EAC, such as hydrogen embrittlement, stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatigue, and liquid metal embrittlement. The symposium will encompass, but not limited to, the following themes: - Models to understand EAC mechanisms and predict the lifetime of structural materials in harsh environments; - Experimental methods for the performance test of EAC in the laboratory and real environments; - Development of physics-based approaches or multiscale models for EAC monitoring and prognostics; - Fracture and fatigue of alloys in hydrogen environment; - Stress corrosion cracking of alloys in high-temperature water, seawater, or other environment; - Degradation of materials in liquid metal environment; - EAC in additively manufactured parts; - EAC in high-entropy alloys.

2018 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: High Temperature Corrosion of Structural Materials: Organized by Kinga Unocic; David Shifler; Mark Weaver; Steve Coryell; James Earthman

High temperature structural materials are used in aircraft and various industrial applications. Exposure to high temperatures and harsh environments can cause their degradation and subsequent failure of the component or system. This symposium seeks papers that study the effect of: - Alloy’s composition on oxidation and/or corrosion, - Different environments, - Presence of stresses under harsh environments, - Alloys protection using coatings, - Could improve further understanding on alloy oxidation and/or corrosionbehavior.

2018 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition: Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors VII: Organized by Ramprashad Prabhakaran; Dennis Keiser; Raul Rebak; Clarissa Yablinsky; Anne Campbell

Globally, significant efforts are ongoing to meet the growing energy demand with the increased use of nuclear energy. Extensive work is being performed to develop materials and fuels for the advanced nuclear reactors. In addition, efforts are also ongoing to extend the life of existing nuclear power plants. Scientists, engineers, and students at various national laboratories, universities, and industries are working on a number of materials challenges for the nuclear energy systems. The objective of this symposium is to provide a platform for these researchers to congregate, exhibit and discuss their current research work, in addition to sharing the challenges and solutions with the professional community and thus, shape the future of nuclear energy. Abstracts are solicited in (but not limited to) the following topics: - Nuclear reactor systems - Advanced nuclear fuels - fabrication, performance, and design - Advanced nuclear fuels - properties and modeling - Advanced structural materials - fabrication, joining, properties, and characterization - Lifetime extension of reactors - nuclear materials aging, degradation, and others - Experimental, modeling, and simulation studies - Fundamental science of radiation-material interactions - Irradiation effects in nuclear materials - Materials degradation issues - stress corrosion cracking, corrosion, creep, fatigue, and others - Design of materials for extreme radiation environments - Radiation measurement techniques and modeling studies - Nuclear waste - disposal, transmutation, spent nuclear fuel reprocessing